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Voices of the Street: My Mother’s Comfort

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2022-03-08
Abstract: 

Content Warning: The stories in this series deal with difficult and sometimes traumatic topics. This episode in particular discusses substance use, family separation and residential schools. Please practice self care, stop listening, and seek help if you need to. Scroll down to find links to available supports.

The fourth episode of the Voices of the Street podcast series features a conversation on Indigenous honour, healing and empowerment, with your host, Nicolas Leech-Crier.

Nicolas interviews Voices of the Street contributor Eva Takakanew about her written piece, “My Mother’s Comfort,” a deeply personal poem and reflection on drug use and the intergenerational mother-child relationships in her life as an adoptee from the Sixties Scoop.

Together they speak about their experiences as adoptees and reconnecting with their culture as adults. They also speak to finding empowerment through Indigenous-led education programs and taking part in the cultural resurgence of their generation.

Document type: 
Audio

Voices of the Street: Without Prejudice

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2022-03-01
Abstract: 

Content Warning: The stories in this series deal with difficult and sometimes traumatic topics. Please practice self care, stop listening, and seek help if you need to. Scroll down to find links to available supports. 

For the third installment of the Voices of the Street podcast, we have a candid and heartful conversation between host Yvonne Mark and Megaphone writer Dennis Gates in response to his piece “Without Prejudice,” published in the 2021 Voices of the Street anthology.

In his piece, Dennis writes about his experiences of anti-Indigenous discrimination and injustice within the court system and the deep-felt impact of incarceration on his life. Yvonne and Dennis reflect on both their experiences with the criminal justice system, finding strength through writing, and the importance of sharing stories like theirs.

This episode was curated and hosted by poet, storyteller and Megaphone vendor, Yvonne Mark, an avid writer and advocate for ending stigma around substance use.

Document type: 
Audio

Voices of the Street: The Din from Within

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2022-02-22
Abstract: 

Content Warning: The stories in this series deal with difficult and sometimes traumatic topics. Please practice self care, stop listening, and seek help if you need to. Scroll down to find links to available supports.

 

Be transported into the soundscapes of two different poems.

This installment of the Voices of the Street podcast is produced by Jules Chapman, a writer and peer support worker who is deeply involved in the Downtown Eastside community. 

Jules reads from the Voices of the Street anthology, sharing Elaine Schell’s “The Din from Within” and the original poem that Jules was inspired to write in response. These pieces take us through writerly reflections on poetic expression, getting to know yourself, processing through writing and sharing creative work with the world.

Document type: 
Audio

Voices of the Street: Why I Choose to Stay

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2022-02-15
Abstract: 

The Voices of the Street podcast makes its debut on Below the Radar

Over the next six weeks, follow along as Megaphone storytellers weave tales and read from the 2021 Voices of the Street anthology. In this first installment, we hear from poet, writer, actor, research tech and overdose responder Nicolas Leech-Crier, in conversation with your host for this episode, Mr. Essential.

Nicolas shares his journey with Megaphone and how he’s cultivated a passion and skill for community storytelling and journalism. He also reads his original poem, “Why I Choose to Stay,” published in the 2021 issue of Voices of the Street — speaking to the piece as an accumulation of his lived experiences on the streets and his insights into fighting stigma with stories, empathy and love.

Due to Nicolas’s story featuring trauma-heavy content, should the poem or anything said during the episode have an adverse effect on your emotional or mental health, we recommend you stop listening to the podcast and refer to your best practices of self-comfort and/or seek support (links provided below).

Listeners are invited to reach out to Nicolas, the creator of this episode, at nicolas@streetcorner.ca if they would like to discuss the contents of the episode.

Document type: 
Audio

The Future of Urban Housing & Climate Policy — with Christine Boyle

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2022-02-08
Abstract: 

City of Vancouver Councillor Christine Boyle sits down with Am Johal to discuss her hopes for the City’s future.

They talk about what can be done on the municipal level to combat the climate crisis, the housing crisis, and the issue of drug poisoning on Vancouver’s streets. 

An organizer, minister and activist, Christine also speaks to her work on the City’s United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples Task Force and how the City can take action on the crises we are facing in a way that addresses inequality.

Document type: 
Article

Russian Influence in Eastern Europe — with Rumena Filipova

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2022-02-03
Abstract: 

 

Writer, researcher, and Chairperson of the Institute for Global Analytics, Rumena Filipova joins host Am Johal to discuss her latest book, Constructing the Limits of Europe: Identity and Foreign Policy in Poland, Bulgaria, and Russia since 1989.

Rumena speaks to how dominant conceptions of national identity have shaped the foreign policy behaviour of the Balkan states, Hungary and Russia. She explores the internal politics of European Union member states, the competing regional forces of Europeanization and their impact on traditions of national identity. 

Am and Rumena discuss the rise of right-wing populism worldwide and how climate change could exacerbate existing geopolitical tensions. This episode also highlights the way national identities can be in flux, and how activists and local community organisers are reasserting liberal democratic norms and their rights through protest.

Document type: 
Audio

Terror Capitalism and Uyghur Dispossession — with Darren Byler

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2022-02-01
Abstract: 

Sociocultural anthropologist and assistant professor at SFU’s School for International Studies, Darren Byler joins Am Johal to speak about his latest book, Terror Capitalism: Uyghur Dispossession and Masculinity in a Chinese City.

Darren describes how China surveilles and dispossesses Uyghur populations through a mass digital surveillance system, connecting it to the war on terror. Darren and Am also discuss the similarities and differences between the colonialism of China with India, Israel, and other Western countries. 

Finally, the conversation goes into how Uyghur men protect their wellbeing by developing anti-colonial friendships. The conversation also highlights how many Han Chinese people are building a community of inter-ethnic solidarity to refuse the colonial structures of the state system.

Document type: 
Audio

Badiou, Universalism & Racial Politics — with Elisabeth Paquette

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Abstract: 

Continental philosopher and assistant professor of Philosophy and Women Gender Studies at the University of North Carolina, Elisabeth Paquette, joins Am Johal to speak about her latest book, Universal Emancipation: Race Beyond Badiou.

Elisabeth speaks about some of her transformative moments as a continental philosopher, including an essential question posed to her by Paget Henry, and her experience joining the Black Lives Matter Charlotte Protests in 2016. Her and Am also speak about the important questions surrounding ideas of justice, how justice can be emancipatory, and the ways that states fail in enacting justice — due to its deep foundations upon race and culture.

Elisabeth spends time critiquing Badiou’s class-first philosophies that undermines possibilities for universality in the sense of race, and then discusses the histories of Marxism centering on whiteness and Eurocentric attitudes. She also speaks about the importance of positive conceptions of race, and draws from Sylvia Wynter to determine that true universal emancipation needs to be filled with the varied and particular knowledges of racialized folks.

Document type: 
Audio

Experimental Pedagogy & Art — with Alessandra Pomarico

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Abstract: 

In this episode, we spoke with Alessandra Pomarico about creating collaborative art for social change, both before and during the pandemic. The show begins by talking about friendship and different collectives in Italy and New York, before moving on to new ways of thinking which combine resistance and existence (re-existence). Centring re-existence in Latin American ideas and the Zapatista movement, Alessandra puts forward a new way of learning through collective living and collaborative art spaces. 

Document type: 
Audio

ALIVE: Creating Systems of Change — with Scott Clark

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Abstract: 

On this week’s episode, we sat down with long-time Indigenous-rights advocate Scott Clark of the Coast Salish S'Klallam nation, and discussed creating systems of change from the ground up that produce positive and evidence based results. Diving into his work with ALIVE, or Aboriginal Life in Vancouver Enhancement Society, Scott talks about his hope regarding youth-led movements while critiquing how settler governments continue to fail Indigenous people.

Having decades of experience working with urban Indigenous people in the Downtown Eastside, Scott explains his misgivings around nonprofits and how, due to funding sources, they can become extensions of a colonial government at the neighbourhood level. He instead proposes Indigenous self-government and the development of more inclusive and fair policy documents.

Document type: 
Audio