Simon Fraser University Vancity Office of Community Engagement

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Book Launch: Jaleh Mansoor’s Marshall Plan Modernism

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2017-02-24
Abstract: 

A book launch for Jaleh Mansoor's Marshall Plan Modernism: Italian Post War Abstraction and the beginnings of Autonomia

Focusing on the work of Italian artists Lucio Fontana, Alberto Burri, and Piero Manzoni, Mansoor's research shows how abstract painting in post WWII Italy critiqued the economic violence of the Marshall Plan and American hegemony, broke with Fascist-associated Futurism and anticipated social unrest and anti-capitalist struggle in the Italian 1960s and 1970s.

AUTHOR

Jaleh Mansoor is Assistant Professor of Art History, Visual Art, and Theory at the University of British Columbia. She is currently working on the relationship between real and aesthetic abstraction 1888-2008. Her research is on abstract painting in the context of the miracolo Italiano and the international relations of the Marshall Plan era nested within the global dynamics of the Cold War opens up on to problems concerning the labour-to-capital relationship and its ramifications in culture and aesthetics. Her work limns the correlation between real and aesthetic abstraction.

Document type: 
Audio

Jim Green Memorial Lecture 2017: Cooperative Social Innovation

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2017-03-01
Abstract: 

For the 5th annual Jim Green Memorial Lecture, Ashley Proctor explores the cultural impact and complexity of collaboration between residents, activists, artists and entrepreneurs as the coworking movement expands around the globe. As one of the original voices of the movement, Ashley is now leading the 312 Main project, working to build Canada's largest and most inclusive collaborative workspace built on cooperative values, in partnership with this vibrant and diverse community of engaged citizens and organizations.

The lecture was preceded by a live performance from local musician Corbin Murdoch.

ABOUT JIM GREEN

Jim Green (May 25, 1943 – February 28, 2012) was an American-Canadian dual citizen who was a longshoreman, taxicab driver, community activist, non-profit housing developer, municipal politician, university instructor, and development consultant. Born in Birmingham, Alabama, Green moved to Canada to avoid being drafted for the Vietnam War. Green completed a Masters in Anthropology from the University of British Columbia, a Bachelor of Arts from the University of South Carolina, and studied at the Sorbonne, the Millennium Film Institute in New York, and the University of Colorado. 

During the 1980's, he was Executive Director of the Downtown Eastside Residents Association. He served in numerous roles in the provincial government in community economic and social housing development. In 2002, he was elected to Vancouver City Council. He was one of the leading forces behind the Woodward's redevelopment, completed in 2010.

BIOS

Ashley Proctor is a partner at Foundery in Toronto, ON. She is the founder of Creative Blueprint in Toronto and Seattle, and is also the Executive Producer of GCUC Canada (Global Coworking Unconference Canada).

As one of the founding members of the Coworking Toronto and Coworking Ontario collectives, Ashley also created COHIP — the first Coworking Health Insurance Plan — for all independent workers in Canada.

Ashley is the Executive Director of the 312 Main project in Vancouver. This project will be a social innovation centre in Vancouver's inner-city that will include local artists, entrepreneurs, community groups, non-profit organizations, residents, and small businesses — a diverse group of members and tenants who are committed to community economic development through collaborative social innovation.

Corbin Murdoch is a songwriter and performer who tours and records with his flagship project, The Nautical Miles. The band has toured across Canada and Europe and have been presented by internationally renowned festivals including The Vancouver Folk Music Festival and the PuSh International Performing Arts Festival. Corbin is also a curator and producer, currently working as the Managing Producer of Theatre Replacement and the Entertainment Programmer at The Vancouver Fringe Festival. Corbin completed a Masters of Fine Arts in Interdisciplinary Studies at SFU in 2014. He was born and raised in Vancouver.

Document type: 
Video

Speaker Series on Aboriginal Issues 2017 — Encountering Early Photography of Northwest Coast First Nations

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2017-03-07
Abstract: 

This presentation examines a set of photographs held in the research archive of the Bill Reid Centre for Northwest Coast Studies at SFU. It traces shifts in meaning as they have moved from commercial, government, and museum contexts toward being held up as symbols of Indigenous pride.

To view some of the photographs mentioned in the presentation, go to www.sfu.ca/brc/virtual_village.html 

SPEAKER BIO

Bryan Myles is the Interim Director of the Bill Reid Centre for Northwest Coast Studies at SFU, where he is working on an interdisciplinary PhD that explores the changing relationship between memory, institutions and Indigenous peoples. His research interests include Indigenous cultural heritage in digital contexts, visual anthropology, postcolonial studies, and material culture. Myles' doctoral research investigates the use of new and emerging media technologies to record, document, safeguard, and create access to Northwest Coast visual cultural heritage.

Myles completed his Master’s degree in sociocultural anthropology at Carleton University in 2008. His M.A. thesis project examined the disjuncture between ecotourism and cultural tourism principles and practice in the Mesoamerican country of Belize.

In his time with the Bill Reid Centre at SFU, Myles has been involved in numerous Northwest Coast art and cultural heritage projects that draw on the visual histories of the coast and the work of historic and contemporary Northwest Coast artists.

Document type: 
Audio

Speaker Series on Aboriginal Issues 2017 — An Investigation at the Brandon Indian Residential School

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2017-03-14
Abstract: 

The history of conducting western scientific research on Aboriginal communities has destroyed relationships between Aboriginal communities and non-Aboriginal academics. Using personal research experience involving searches for unmarked graves at the Brandon Indian Residential School as a case example, this presentation explores the complicated and largely unspoken process of how to begin the conversations that create the opportunities to do meaningful research with a community. From this relational starting point, this presentation details the importance of ongoing consultation and collaborative research design grounded in the community’s interests, needs, objectives and concerns. In this way, we can begin the process of creating a strong relationship with an Aboriginal community, capable of fostering respectful research and building alliances.

SPEAKER BIO

Katherine Nichols is an anthropologist who obtained a Bachelor of Arts degree from Brandon University and a Master of Arts degree from the University of Manitoba. Katherine is currently a doctoral student at Simon Fraser University. Her research interests include forensic search methods, oral histories, and archival research.

Document type: 
Audio

Speaker Series on Aboriginal Issues 2017 — Reclaiming Story with the Help of Digital Media

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2017-03-21
Abstract: 

This presentation discusses the path of re-claiming stories that were recorded from Secwepemc knowledge keepers in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Unfortunately, these stories survive in English renditions only. Through collaborative story-writing with elders in her home community, Skeetchestn and other Secwepemc communities, Marianne Ignace and Chief Ron Ignace re-translated and re-claimed them in the Secwepemc language by re-thinking their meaning, style and message, and the places and environments they connect to.

The group then turned them into digital media, accompanied by vibrant illustrations which also involved collaboration between a young artist and elders. Making these available, celebrating them on the land and reconnecting to the places of the stories, but then also making them available as an app to enable digital learning allows new generations of Secwepemc to access them and learn to tell them.

SPEAKER BIO

Marianne Ignace is the director of the First Nations Language Centre at Simon Fraser University, and is a professor in the departments of Linguistics and First Nations Studies. She currently directs a seven-year SSHRC Partnership Grant on First Nations language revitalization in BC and Yukon, working with 12 diverse language groups. Her own research has focused on Secwepemc, Sm’algyax and Haida language documentation, and she continues to work with elders and language learners in her home community, Skeetchestn, in her adopted community, Old Massett in Haida Gwaii and with Sm’algyax speakers and learners in Prince Rupert. Her other interests are ethnobotany and Indigenous language story-work.

Document type: 
Audio

SHAPING VANCOUVER 2017: RESHAPING CONVERSATIONS ON HERITAGE — The Future of Heritage in Vancouver

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2017-03-23
Abstract: 

Under the Heritage Action Plan of 2015, development commenced on a new thematic framework in order to update the Vancouver Heritage Register so that it reflected newer approaches to heritage. This includes recognizing a broader range of heritage values beyond just the architectural. This work on the new framework is nearing completion and will change how we evaluate and recognize heritage in the city.

Heritage consultant Donald Luxton of Donald Luxton & Associates Inc., who is conducting the update, will introduce the new thematic framework and panelists will explore what the adoption of these broader heritage values may mean for communities, our definition and understanding of heritage, and the progression of heritage planning in Vancouver.

Document type: 
Audio

Speaker Series on Aboriginal Issues 2017 — Indigenous Community Enterprises in the Andes: Challenges and Opportunities

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2017-03-28
Abstract: 

The field of Indigenous entrepreneurship arose from inquiries into the nature of entrepreneurship among diverse cultural groups, highlighting that the standard conception of the innovative, risk-taking individual does not accurately describe entrepreneurship by marginalized populations (Indigenous, immigrant, etc.) (Anderson, 2006; Mitchell, 1999). Indigenous entrepreneurship tends to have a collective orientation in structure or distribution of benefits (Swinney, 2007). Research with Indigenous communities in the Peruvian Andes shows that the community-based enterprise is a common model — in which the community acts “corporately as both entrepreneur and enterprise in pursuit of the common good” (Peredo & Chrisman, 2006). For profit activities are established to generate revenues for health and education services or to retain and regenerate traditional cultural practices.

This research explores several cases of Indigenous-run community enterprises in Bolivia and Ecuador — tracing their characteristics, benefits and challenges for contributing to well-being in the broadest sense. The potential contribution of such enterprises to self-determination is also discussed.

SPEAKER BIO

Gretchen Ferguson (Hernandez) is Associate Director, International and Researcher with the Centre for Sustainable Community Development. She has spent over 20 years engaged in applied research and professional practice in Latin America and Canada related to sustainable communities, community economic development, Indigenous economic development and decolonization, social economy, and measuring the impacts of development projects and initiatives. She teaches courses regularly in Sustainable Community Development, Development and Sustainability, and Human Geography in the Faculty of Environment. Gretchen holds a PhD in Geography from Simon Fraser University, a Masters in Community and Regional Planning from the University of British Columbia, and a Bachelor's degree in International Relations from Concordia University.

Document type: 
Audio

I Don't Want To Choose: Deepa Mehta in conversation with Jeet Thayll

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2013-07-13
Abstract: 

Co-presented by Indian Summer Festival and SFU’s Vancity Office of Community Engagement.

Discussion with Sirish Rao, filmmaker Deepa Mehta and writer Jeet Thayll.

Document type: 
Video

Happy City

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2013-07-11
Abstract: 

Co-presented by Indian Summer Festival and SFU’s Vancity Office of Community Engagement.

Lucy Hyslop, Charles Montgomery, John Helliwell and Victor Chan discuss the 'Happy City' at Indian Summer Festival.

Document type: 
Video

Reluctant Rebellions

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2013-07-07
Abstract: 

Co-presented by Indian Summer Festival and SFU’s Vancity Office of Community Engagement.

Writer Shauna Singh Baldwin in conversation with Satwinder Bains

Document type: 
Video