Quality, Access & Evaluation

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Quality Indicators for International Benchmarking of Mental Health Care

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2006
Abstract: 

Objective. To identify quality measures for international benchmarking of mental health care that assess important processes and outcomes of care, are scientifically sound, and are feasible to construct from preexisting data.

Design. An international expert panel employed a consensus development process to select important, sound, and feasible measures based on a framework that balances these priorities with the additional goal of assessing the breadth of mental health care across key dimensions.

Participants. Six countries and one international organization nominated seven panelists consisting of mental health administrators, clinicians, and services researchers with expertise in quality of care, epidemiology, public health, and public policy.

Measures. Measures with a final median score of at least 7.0 for both importance and soundness, and data availability rated as ‘possible’ or better in at least half of participating countries, were included in the final set. Measures with median scores ≤3.0 or data availability rated as ‘unlikely’ were excluded. Measures with intermediate scores were subject to further discussion by the panel, leading to their adoption or rejection on a case-by-case basis.

Results. From an initial set of 134 candidate measures, the panel identified 12 measures that achieved moderate to high scores on desired attributes.

Conclusions. Although limited, the proposed measure set provides a starting point for international benchmarking of mental health care. It addresses known quality problems and achieves some breadth across diverse dimensions of mental health care.

Document type: 
Article

Mental Disorder, Substance Use and Criminal Justice Contact

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2005
Abstract: 

In May 2003, the Minister of State for Mental Health brought together representatives from Ministry of Health Services (MOHS), Ministry of Children and Family Development (MCFD), Ministry of Attorney General (MAG) and the Ministry for Public Safety and Solicitor General (MPSSG) to address the prevalence of people with mental and substance use disorders who are involved in the justice system. The result was a cross-ministry commitment to develop a report about mentally disordered offenders in the justice system in order to identify the high priority and long-term issues for this population and provide recommendations to address these concerns. The many challenges associated with mental health, substance use and the justice system are recognized world wide, and a number of reforms are underway in different jurisdictions. Invariably, these reforms reflect a combination of local needs, resources, legislation and a consideration of available evidence. A critical first step in the process of reform is careful review of available information. In British Columbia, the provincial government has formed an interministerial steering committee, with research support provided through the University of British Columbia. The UBC team, in collaboration with other experts in Canada and abroad, collected and analysed information in the following formats: Literature Review: A scholarly review of the international literature. To our knowledge, this is the most comprehensive review available of the professional literature pertaining to mental disorders, substance use disorders and criminal justice contact. Survey of Other Jurisdictions: A survey highlighting areas of need and opportunities for reform in jurisdictions across Canada and elsewhere. BC Data Analysis: A report examining the administrative data for addressing mental illness and substance use in relation to the justice system in BC. These analyses are based on an unprecedented linkage of administrative information concerning corrections and health services for the population. In 1999/2000, there were 52,000 individuals (43,859 adults and 8,234 youth) involved with the provincial corrections system. Almost 15,000 (29 percent) of the total cohort were classified as mentally disordered offenders. The prevalence rate is nearly twice the rate for the general British Columbia population.

 

Document type: 
Report

Telehealth Handbook

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2003
Abstract: 

The Centre for Telehealth (CT@M) Handbook is a resource for the growing number of people working in the field of telehealth, with a particular focus on applications in the area of mental health and addictions. It is intended to provide Site Coordinators and others with practical information, guidelines, and forms for clinical and evaluation purposes.

Document type: 
Report
File(s): 

Aboriginal Mental Health - What Works Best

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2001
Abstract: 

In July 1999, the first meeting of the Aboriginal Mental Health Committee was held at the Longhouse, UBC . This discussion paper represents the discussions of the Committee's working group based on their viewpoints and the literature available in the area of Aboriginal Mental Heath, including information from the Assembly of First Nations (AFN) and Inuit Tapirisat of Canada (ITC) Environmental Scan (Federal) and the Royal Commission Reports on Aboriginal Peoples. The paper is intended for distribution across the province for input in focus group format.

Document type: 
Report
File(s): 

Electroconvulsive Therapy - Guidelines for Health Authorities in British Columbia

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2000
Abstract: 

The purpose of these guidelines for electroconvulsive therapy (ECT Guidelines) is to standardize the delivery of electroconvulsive therapy services across British Columbia. There will be differences in the way care is delivered according to local resources, but good basic care must be available wherever ECT is provided.

These guidelines cover patient and family education, clinical applications of ECT by physicians, nurses, and anesthetists, as well as suggestions for charting, professional education, and quality assurance programs.

Disclaimer: This document appears here with permission from the UBC Department of Psychiatry and the BC Ministry of Health. The material is only current to the date of initial publication. New, more accurate, information may be available. For completeness, please investigate the most recent details on this topic.

Document type: 
Report
File(s): 

Housing and Support for Adults with Severe Addictions and/or Mental Illness in British Columbia

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2008
Abstract: 

In August 2006, the BC Ministry of Health – Mental Health and Addictions Branch asked the Centre for Applied Research in Mental Health and Addiction (CARMHA) at Simon Fraser University to provide up-to-date information with regard to the scope of homelessness in BC, recommended solutions and associated costs. CARMHA drew upon diverse sources of information including published literature, academic experts, decision-makers and key informants throughout BC in order to generate answers to some of the most pressing questions regarding the needs of this population. We hope that this report will provide the basis for constructive action to deal with the overlapping problems of homelessness and severe addictions and/or mental illness.

Document type: 
Report
File(s): 

Housing for People with Substance Use and Concurrent Disorders: Summary of Literature and Annotated Bibliography

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2007
Abstract: 

Researchers at the Centre for Applied Research on Mental Health and Addiction (CARMHA) were contracted by Vancouver Coastal Health Authority to compile a brief, annotated bibliography focussing on the provision of housing for people with substance use and co-occurring mental disorders. A comprehensive literature review was completed. The list of publications and search methods are attached. The initial list was culled to extract those manuscripts with the greatest relevance. An expert panel reviewed each of the selected manuscripts and reached consensus on the major conclusions, implications, and quality of each paper. Finally, a brief synopsis of findings was produced.

Document type: 
Report
File(s): 

End of Life in Dementia Care: Research Evidence to Support the Provincial Dementia Service Framework

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2007
Abstract: 

 

As the population of British Columbia continues to age, an increasingly large proportion is anticipated to require services and supports as a result of various forms of dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease and other mental health problems that affect the elderly.

While dementia is usually recognized in the later stages of the illness, research and best practices have demonstrated that early intervention strategies delay the onset of dementia or slow its progression, improving the quality of life for older British  Columbians and their families. Comprehensive, integrated services across the continuum of care that address individual unmet needs over the course of the disease are fundamental to optimal health outcomes not only for patients with dementia, but also for their families and caregivers. The Ministry of Health, health authorities and leading experts are working in partnership to develop a Provincial Service Framework for Dementia, which includes evidence-based best practices as well as patient and provider experiences to improve service delivery across provider levels and throughout the course of the disease.   This project provides applied research activities to support the development of a Framework that, once completed, will support health authorities in the development and implementation of dementia strategies.The initial stage of the project focused on summarizing evidence on best and emerging practices related to managing end-of-life issues for seniors with dementia and other mental health problems.  The recommendations of the End of Life Research Report have been incorporated into the Dementia Service Framework.

Document type: 
Report