Gender, Sexuality and Women's Studies - Theses, Dissertations, and other Required Graduate Degree Essays

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“Too posh to push" or too quick to cut? Deconstructing media representations of elective caesarean sections

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2007
Abstract: 

In March 2004, Canadian obstetrician Mary Hannah published a controversial article about elective caesarean sections in the Canadian Medical Association Journal. Hannah argues that “a growing number of women are requesting delivery by elective caesarean section without an accepted ‘medical indication’” and suggests that physicians should support women’s requests (2004: 813- 814). Despite a paucity of research surrounding elective caesarean sections, many print media journalists and authors throughout Canada accept Hannah’s claim, and allege that “too posh to push” women are responsible for high rates of caesarean sections and birthing interventions. I situate media representations of elective caesarean sections in the context of Canada’s evolving maternity system, and explore how media reporters manage birthing “uncertainties” through the construction of “truths” about women’s birthing choices. Media authors’ insistence on blaming mothers in media representations of elective caesarean sections obscures the broader cultural, social and economic contexts in which women give birth.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Cindy Patton
Department: 
Dept. of Women's Studies - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

"One index finger on the mouse scroll bar and the other on my clit" : slash writers' views on pornography, censorship, feminism and risk

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2001
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Theses (Dept. of Women's Studies) / Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

Feminist standpoint epistemologies with/in the natural sciences

Author: 
Date created: 
1996
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Theses (Dept. of Women's Studies) / Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

Born to do it? The social construction of motherhood

Author: 
Date created: 
2006
Abstract: 

Dominant ideologies of motherhood have limited the choices many women have made about when, if, or how they become mothers. Adrienne Rich describes this as the "institution" of motherhood. This thesis explores the question of how twenty-first century mothers feel constrained or empowered by current mothering ideologies. Interviews were conducted with eight Greater Vancouver mothers representing a variety of racial, socio-economic, and marital backgrounds. Some mothers stated that at times they feel pressured to measure up to an idealized standard of motherhood; others believed that decisions they make in relation to mothering are mostly influenced by their own free-will and resourcefulness. Motherhood in the twenty-first century is as diverse as individual mothers themselves. Andrea O'Reilly's nuanced theoretical understanding of resistance helps us to see how women redefine what motherhood means to them and how to legitimize diverse ways of mothering.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Department of Women's Studies - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)