Gender, Sexuality and Women's Studies - Theses, Dissertations, and other Required Graduate Degree Essays

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Selling the menopausal body: A critical analysis of physician targeted HRT advertising -AND- Community-university co-operative model case study: A reflexive and exploratory look at one CBR experience

Author: 
Date created: 
2007
Abstract: 

Selling the Menopausal Body: Over time, what role has physician targeted, North America, hormone replacement therapy (HRT) advertising played in the medicalization of menopause? How have these ads constructed HRT knowledge for physicians and women? Employing close textual analysis, I examine several decades of medical journal HRT advertising and place this analysis within existing critical feminist critiques of HRT. I show how these ads systematically and negatively portray women, their bodies and menopause. Community-University Co-operative Model Case Study: Can university involved community-based research (CBR) be useful to communities? To what degree can individuals from universities participate in CBR? From a critical perspective, challenging existing models and the current state of university-centred CBR, I present a detailed case study of a community-university collaborative CBR project, Three Days in the Fire Pit, arguing a strong case for a model that successfully navigates CBR and avoids university control.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
C
Department: 
Dept. of Women's Studies - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Essays (M.A.)

Reading GAM in craigslist personal ads: Constructing gay Asian males during the negotiation of anal intercourse -and- Remembering spatially: Refocussing the history of Vancouver's gay community

Date created: 
2007
Abstract: 

The identity “gay Asian male” (GAM) is proposed and contested in online personal ads, where ethnicity and other visible traits are used to describe individuals as attractive suitors and request or refuse potential partners. This paper explores the relationship between identity and desire, focusing on representations of GAM in craigslist ads, a site where men seek men for sexual encounters. In particular, it considers GAM as constructed by cultural meanings derived from characteristics set by HIV/AIDS prevention literature. Existing historical geographies of gay communities in North America, including local media representations of Vancouver’s gay community, follow an identity politics metanarrative of gay liberation and subculture formation. This paper challenges this metanarrative, reframing Vancouver’s gay community’s formation by considering real estate events, key community relationships—highlighted in 1981, and nostalgic memory. The interaction of these components contributes to the maintenance of the community’s political visibility and concentration along Vancouver’s Davie Street.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
C
Department: 
Dept. of Women's Studies - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Essays (M.A.)

“Too posh to push" or too quick to cut? Deconstructing media representations of elective caesarean sections

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2007
Abstract: 

In March 2004, Canadian obstetrician Mary Hannah published a controversial article about elective caesarean sections in the Canadian Medical Association Journal. Hannah argues that “a growing number of women are requesting delivery by elective caesarean section without an accepted ‘medical indication’” and suggests that physicians should support women’s requests (2004: 813- 814). Despite a paucity of research surrounding elective caesarean sections, many print media journalists and authors throughout Canada accept Hannah’s claim, and allege that “too posh to push” women are responsible for high rates of caesarean sections and birthing interventions. I situate media representations of elective caesarean sections in the context of Canada’s evolving maternity system, and explore how media reporters manage birthing “uncertainties” through the construction of “truths” about women’s birthing choices. Media authors’ insistence on blaming mothers in media representations of elective caesarean sections obscures the broader cultural, social and economic contexts in which women give birth.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Cindy Patton
Department: 
Dept. of Women's Studies - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

"One index finger on the mouse scroll bar and the other on my clit" : slash writers' views on pornography, censorship, feminism and risk

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2001
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Theses (Dept. of Women's Studies) / Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)