Urban Studies - Theses, Dissertations, and other Required Graduate Degree Essays

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Spaces of engagement and the politics of scale in B.C.’s Gateway program

Date created: 
2010
Abstract: 

This paper investigates the development and behaviour of the Greater Vancouver Gateway Council. The objective is to examine this group’s role in governments’ decisions to invest in transportation infrastructure in B.C.’s Lower Mainland, particularly the Gateway Program. Evidence used includes interviews, reports and studies, government documents and news articles that show relationships between the Gateway Council and governments and the regional transportation authority. Using the theories of Kevin R. Cox and others, this study shows that the Gateway Council influenced governments in order to implement its infrastructure agenda. The group’s success is based on access to governments, national transportation policy trends, and disparate local opposition to increased transportation infrastructure. This success translates to expanded road and bridge capacity in the Vancouver region; an understanding of this group’s role in influencing governments may be important for an understanding of changes to the region’s urban form.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
P
Department: 
Urban Studies Program - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Research Project (M.Urb.)

Making space for children and youth in Surrey City Centre: An assessment of child and youth friendly policy & practice in Surrey, British Columbia

Date created: 
2010
Abstract: 

The City of Surrey’s Plan for the Social Wellbeing of Surrey Residents, adopted in 2006, identifies creating a child and youth friendly city as a priority. This research project examines Surrey’s City Centre Plan Update, Phase II, Stage 1 report and Interim Urban Design Guidelines to understand how the City’s priority to be child and youth friendly is reflected in long term plans for Surrey City Centre. The analysis is framed around five physical elements or “building blocks” of a child and youth friendly city: land use and density, public realm, parks and play space, housing, and transportation. Through qualitative content analysis and interviews with City of Surrey staff, the research reveals the extent to which the needs of young people have been incorporated into plans for Surrey City Centre and discusses challenges associated with planning for families in what will be Surrey’s highest density neighbourhood.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
K
Department: 
Urban Studies Program - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Research Project (M.Urb.)

The challenge of engaging ethno-cultural and immigrant residents in the development of urban sustainability policies - the cases of Brampton, Ontario and Surrey, BC

Author: 
Date created: 
2010
Abstract: 

In an era where the levels of immigration are changing the size and the context of municipal populations throughout Canada, immigrant rich municipalities are forced to find ways to ensure that all voices are heard, and are part of the urban sustainable land-use policy development process. I have chosen to conduct a comparative case study of the municipalities of Brampton, Ontario and Surrey, BC, to discover how they have managed to engage the voices of their ethno-cultural and immigrant populations in their sustainable policy development processes. In order to answer the research questions posed I bring together the theories of “just sustainability” and municipal readiness/responsiveness and have developed a checklist to provide a set of criteria that will allow me to systematically examine the extent to which Brampton and Surrey have been inclusive of their ethno-cultural and immigrant residents.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
K
Department: 
Urban Studies Program - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Research Project (M.Urb.)

Sustainable for whom? An analysis of housing affordability in proto-sustainable cities

Date created: 
2010
Abstract: 

Is it mere coincidence that some of the world’s most sustainable cities are also some of the least affordable? This study hypothesized that sustainability as a planning paradigm may be gentrifying North American cities. The findings of this study clearly show that this is possible, as determined through a comparison of the correlation between sustainability efforts and housing affordability in three sets of cities. Though this phenomenon may not be intentional, this undermines the efforts of proto-sustainable cities and inhibits their ability to develop into truly sustainable places. This small, but crucial, piece of research lays the foundation for future research on the interplay between sustainability policies and housing. Additionally, this research serves to caution urban planners against the assumption that sustainability plans and programs benefit everyone equally, and encourages them to consider the potential housing impact of planning for a sustainable future.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
M
Department: 
Urban Studies Program - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Research Project (M.Urb.)

Power and the newsprint media’s framing of the Downtown Eastside

Author: 
Date created: 
2010
Abstract: 

The newsprint media’s portrayal of the Downtown Eastside (DTES) is often taken as just an objective reflection of the DTES without taking into account the media’s constitutive capacity and the power relations embedded in such representations. Thus, the media has broad social implications, affecting such phenomena as DTES related public policy and social movements and ultimately, the DTES itself. These social constructivist sentiments provide the theoretical basis for my content analysis of 247 articles of The Vancouver Sun and The Province from 1997 to 2008. I argue that the media’s dominant framing of the DTES reproduces and is, in part, a reflection of the existing asymmetric power relations of society. Consequently, this hegemonic framing doubly stigmatizes the DTES: firstly, privileging outsiders’ monochromatic portrayals of the DTES as a problematic space defined through the medicalization, criminalization, and socialization lens and secondly, framing its residents as passive social actors of constructive change.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
N
Department: 
Urban Studies Program - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Research Project (M.Urb.)

Exploring transportation planning in the Bow Valley Corridor

Date created: 
2010
Abstract: 

Canada, once a world leader in transportation innovation, now finds itself poorly positioned and critically unprepared for a post-carbon future. As federal and provincial transportation authorities continue to push ahead massive highway building programs − intended to facilitate growth in Asia-Pacific trade − in and through Western Canada, an increasing amount of evidence suggests that soon, Peak Oil will undermine the practical value of such projects. The ongoing Trans Canada Highway Twinning Project through Banff National Park is one such example, and indicative of our misplaced emphasis regarding transportation planning in the Bow Valley Corridor. This project aims to explore how that vision has come to dominate regional transportation activities through the observations and opinions of regional stakeholders. Of particular focus is how these stakeholders think about regional transportation issues, develop appropriate solutions, and ultimately, whether or not they might shift towards a sustainable transportation paradigm.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
A
Department: 
Urban Studies Program - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Research Project (M.Urb.)

Holding the line: the value of agricultural land in Delta, BC

Date created: 
2010
Abstract: 

Public values and social norms form the basis of land use regulation by dictating the land use issues requiring regulation and setting acceptable land use management approaches. Over time, public values and social norms change. Consequently, regulation must evolve to reflect value changes or face irrelevance. In Delta, British Columbia, three levels of government are responsible for determining agricultural land use regulation. Historically, resource management rationales, based on identifying the physical capabilities of the land to determine the appropriate use of land, have supported local regulation. Although the region is subject to typical urban growth pressures, this approach has served to maintain agricultural land for agricultural uses, and helped define an edge to urban growth. By analyzing the Tsawwassen Golf and Country Club development application and existing agricultural land use regulation, this project demonstrates that public values and social norms continue to support existing regulations for agricultural land management.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
M
Department: 
Urban Studies Program - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Research Project (M.Urb.)

Risk communication in public consultations for locally unwanted land uses: a study of the public consultation for the South East False Creek neighbourhood energy facility

Author: 
Date created: 
2010
Abstract: 

City governments all over the world are looking at ways to promote and incorporate sustainable sources of energy. The City of Vancouver attempted to incorporate such a process using biomass combustion in the South East False Creek development, a new model sustainable community in the centre of the city. However, this technology was rejected and an opportunity to employ this beneficial energy source was missed. This project examines the public consultation process for this proposal to determine how it might have contributed to the rejection. Challenges to the acceptance of such a technology by the public, both generally and for this project specifically, were exposed. It was determined that the rejection of biomass combustion as an energy generation technology was largely a consequence of faulty execution of certain components of the planning and consultation processes and less a result of unacceptable risk inherent to the proposal itself.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
K
Department: 
Urban Studies Program - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Research Project (M.Urb.)

Did the Town of Ladysmith’s community visioning process increase broader municipal engagement?

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2009
Abstract: 

This project on civic engagement in the Town of Ladysmith explores the potential that a short-term municipal visioning process influenced broader civic engagement outside of its scope. Using mixed methods to triangulate quantitative, qualitative, and participatory data, this research incorporates existing literature and investigates new ways of measuring civic engagement. The results demonstrate the importance of trust, transparency, clear two-way communication, and shared responsibility in creating effective community engagement. This research also demonstrates a preliminary indication that unplanned civic engagement increases may be a result of finite engagement events when those events meet the above criteria for collaboration between citizens and their local government.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
M
Department: 
Urban Studies Program - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Research Project (M.Urb.)

Socio-demographic factors and civic voting behaviour: the case of Vancouver

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2009
Abstract: 

Socio-Demographic Factors and Civic Voting Behaviour: The Case of Vancouver considers the relationship between voting behaviour in the 2008 Vancouver municipal election and socio-demographic characteristics of people living in Vancouver’s voting divisions. It includes a focus on voting behaviour and the socio-demographic variable of housing tenure. While related studies on election behaviour have taken place at the federal and provincial levels, little has taken place at the municipal level. Using quantitative data from Statistics Canada 2006 Census and City of Vancouver 2008 election, the hypotheses of these relationships are tested using regression analysis. The explanatory variables found to have a statistically significant influence on the vote for Vision Vancouver, the centre-left civic party, are university education, Chinese immigrants, rented dwellings, voter participation, youth, and persons 55 years and over. The socio-demographic data is further analyzed with thematic maps to provide additional context about the location of these voters in Vancouver.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
P
Department: 
Urban Studies Program - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Research Project (M.Urb.)