Urban Studies

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Employer Transit Subsidy Study: Executive Summary

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2020-07-28
Abstract: 

This study found that the larger the transit subsidy offered, the more employees were induced to become transit riders and the more transit-only commuting increased. The increase in transit-only commuting came from a reduction in auto-only and auto-and-transit commuting. Transit subsidy acceptance and effectiveness can be dampened by factors such as the availability of cheap parking, or greater distance between the workplace and rapid transit, leading to some variability in outcomes. Transit ridership and subsidy acceptance were associated with various positive self-reported improvements to workers’ quality of life, including their health, stress levels and commute predictability. These positive quality of life outcomes were achieved without the transit subsidy having any observed effects on work schedules, turnover and performance.

Document type: 
Report
File(s): 

Employer Transit Subsidy Study: Main Report

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2020-07-28
Abstract: 

This study found that the larger the transit subsidy offered, the more employees were induced to become transit riders and the more transit-only commuting increased. The increase in transit-only commuting came from a reduction in auto-only and auto-and-transit commuting. Transit subsidy acceptance and effectiveness can be dampened by factors such as the availability of cheap parking, or greater distance between the workplace and rapid transit, leading to some variability in outcomes. Transit ridership and subsidy acceptance were associated with various positive self-reported improvements to workers’ quality of life, including their health, stress levels and commute predictability. These positive quality of life outcomes were achieved without the transit subsidy having any observed effects on work schedules, turnover and performance.

Document type: 
Report
File(s): 

Cooperation, Proximity, and Social Innovation: Three Ingredients for Industrial Medium-Sized Towns’ Renewal?

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2020-04-04
Abstract: 

Over several decades, medium-sized industrial towns have suffered from a combination of economic and political processes: Deindustrialization, metropolization, and withdrawal of public services. After two decades in which they have been somewhat neglected (in favor of metropolises), there have recently been State and European public policies aimed at them. Medium-sized cities are not homogeneous and present several trajectories. Based on quantitative approach in France, we highlight the very diverse socio-economic dynamics of French medium-sized industrial towns. Thus, far from widespread decline or shrinking dynamics, some of these cities are experiencing an economic rebound. This is the case of Romans-sur-Isère, a medium-sized town located in the south-east of France. Focusing our qualitative analyze on this city, we try to understand this type of process. In this medium-sized town, former capital of the shoe industry, local stakeholders, private, and public try to support a productive renewal. The results of our case study highlight the role that cooperation, spatial and organizational proximity, and social innovation could play in the renewal of productive economy in medium-sized industrial towns. Even if the economic situation remains difficult for many medium-sized cities in France as in Europe, we argue that they could have a productive future making and ultimately take advantages of their “medium-sized” attributes.

Over several decades, medium-sized industrial towns have suffered from a combination of economic and political processes: Deindustrialization, metropolization, and withdrawal of public services. After two decades in which they have been somewhat neglected (in favor of metropolises), there have recently been State and European public policies aimed at them. Medium-sized cities are not homogeneous and present several trajectories. Based on quantitative approach in France, we highlight the very diverse socio-economic dynamics of French medium-sized industrial towns. Thus, far from widespread decline or shrinking dynamics, some of these cities are experiencing an economic rebound. This is the case of Romans-sur-Isère, a medium-sized town located in the south-east of France. Focusing our qualitative analyze on this city, we try to understand this type of process. In this medium-sized town, former capital of the shoe industry, local stakeholders, private, and public try to support a productive renewal. The results of our case study highlight the role that cooperation, spatial and organizational proximity, and social innovation could play in the renewal of productive economy in medium-sized industrial towns. Even if the economic situation remains difficult for many medium-sized cities in France as in Europe, we argue that they could have a productive future making and ultimately take advantages of their “medium-sized” attributes.

 

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Citizenship and Cities: The Torch of a Sustainable Future

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2018-09-24
Abstract: 

In this presentation given at SFU on September 24, 2018, adjunct professor Ken Cameron introduces his new book, Showing the Way: Peter Oberlander and the Imperative of Global Citizenship. Through the previously unpublished story of Oberlander's progression from persecution and internment to becoming a pioneer in Canadian urbanism, Cameron's book elucidates the remarkable evolution of the concept of citizenship over the past 100 years. Cameron's lecture focuses on the meaning of citizenship today as a set of rights and responsibilities we must exercise at the local, national and international levels if humanity is to survive the forces of nativism, intolerance and protectionism now sweeping our world.

Document type: 
Video

Cities in a Sea of Uncertainty: Growing the Conversation on Regional Planning and Governance in Metro Vancouver

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2017-03
Abstract: 

Metro Vancouver is growing rapidly and urban development patterns may no longer align with the regional vision that has helped shape the area’s land use over the last 50 years. This study explores some recent land use and transportation decisions in Metro Vancouver, as well as the political dynamics and decision-making processes that have influenced the region through a series of case studies. Specifically, this report aims to summarize the current state of the region in the context of land use and transportation planning decisions and the intergovernmental collaboration and processes underpinning these decisions. This report also examines the success and legacy of the “Cities in a Sea of Green Vision” LMRPB vision and pathways forward.

Document type: 
Report

Urban Challenges Forum 5 (January 17, 2017)—Riverfront Remake: What Vision is the City Crafting, and for Whom?

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2017-11-15
Abstract: 

New Westminster’s most significant cultural, economic and natural asset, the riverfront, is slated for major change. How is the city going to balance history, housing, business and tourism, while creating a vibrant and welcoming space for all? Watch the videos below to see how this discussion took shape at the Urban Challenges Forum on January 17, 2018.

 

Document type: 
Video

Urban Challenges Forum 4 (November 15, 2017)—Truth and Reconciliation: Cities and Citizens

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2017-11-15
Abstract: 

Truth and Reconciliation is spoken about a lot, but what does it actually mean for cities and individual citizens? Learn some uncomfortable truths of New Westminster history, how the city is responding to Truth and Reconciliation, and why it’s the responsibility of all citizens to effect change.

 

Document type: 
Video

Urban Challenges Forum 3 (October 18, 2017)—The Cost of Moving People and Goods: Who Pays?

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2017-10-18
Abstract: 

Transportation infrastructure is a hot button topic in Metro Vancouver. Paying for transit, bridges, tunnels, roads and moving goods and people costs money. So, who pays for it all? How will mobility pricing work in the City of New Westminster? How will the cost affect the average consumer? Watch the videos from the Urban Challenges Forum 3 to learn how this part of a bigger conversation unfolded at this Urban Challenges Forum.

Document type: 
Video

Urban Challenges Forum 2 (March 30, 2017)—Fentanyl: Breaking the Cycle

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2017-03-30
Abstract: 

The fentanyl crisis is new, but the opioid crisis is not. Watch the videos below to learn about how fentanyl fits within a pattern of opioid crises that goes back to the 1970s; the overlapping issues of homelessness, addiction, mental illness and criminality; how police are responding and the ethical challenges they face; and long-term solutions based on a practical understanding of the larger issues.

Document type: 
Video

Urban Challenges Forum Session 1 - Housing: What Have We Done?

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2017-03-09
Abstract: 

This public forum provided a hard look at the political, historical and social roots of the homelessness crisis in Canada and the Metro Vancouver region and explored how our perception of housing has shifted from home to commodity. Also discussed was how the City of New Westminster has emerged as a leader in fighting homelessness.

Document type: 
Video