Sociology and Anthropology - Theses, Dissertations, and other Required Graduate Degree Essays

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The irrelevance of "demarcationist" philosophies of science for the sociology of knowledge

Date created: 
1983
Abstract: 

Sociology of Knowledge is influenced by theories of philosophy which demarcate science from non science. It is argued furthermore that scientific enquiry can be divided into a context of justification and a context of discovery. Within the context of justification, notions such as “observation language”, “theory”, “ axiomatization” etc are sufficient to fully explain the results of scientific enquiry. The context of discovery includes human circumstances but these cannot contribute to the justification of science as a claim to knowledge. I argue that the arguments presented are crucially flawed and cannot serve to justify any principled demarcation or division of contexts. I argue that scientific knowledge may well be presented in an artificial language but this language cannot be demarcated from ordinary language. Scientific enquiry can be placed in a broader cognitive outlook supported by broader cultural practices and ordinary language.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
K
Department: 
Dept. of Sociology and Anthropology - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

Ordering conduct, conducting order : conduct disorder and the production of knowledge

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1997
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Theses (Dept. of Sociology and Anthropology) - / Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (Ph.D.)

The unmasking of civil society in Mexico : the EZLN discourse on democratic development

Author: 
Date created: 
1996
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Theses (Dept. of Sociology and Anthropology) - / Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

Discord in Paradise : tourism development and public controversy in Maui, Hawaii

Author: 
Date created: 
1996
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Theses (Dept. of Sociology and Anthropology) - / Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)