Sociology and Anthropology - Theses, Dissertations, and other Required Graduate Degree Essays

Receive updates for this collection

Queer couples’ narratives of birthing: a B.C. focus on the intersections of identity, choice, resources, family, policy, medicalization, and health in the experiences of queers birthing

Author: 
Date created: 
2007
Abstract: 

This thesis focuses on the narratives of 10 queer couples’ birthing experiences in British Columbia. Not only does this thesis add to the continually growing anthropological interest in reproduction and kinship, but it also is able to reflect very practically on two recent changes in British Columbia: 1) the regulation of midwifery in 1998, and 2) the legal possibility of having two women named on their child’s birth certificate, since 2002. Three large themes arose from the research narratives: 1) the choices and experiences of having a ‘medical’ and/or ‘natural’ birth, 2) defining what ‘kinship’ and ‘family’ mean, and how roles and recognition are managed in a queer-parented family, and 3) how bureaucracies understand and deal with queer-parented families. In the end, this thesis provides an important and unique look at birthing and familial recognition in one of the most queer-friendly places in the world.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
S
Department: 
Dept. of Sociology and Anthropology - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

The irrelevance of "demarcationist" philosophies of science for the sociology of knowledge

Date created: 
1983
Abstract: 

Sociology of Knowledge is influenced by theories of philosophy which demarcate science from non science. It is argued furthermore that scientific enquiry can be divided into a context of justification and a context of discovery. Within the context of justification, notions such as “observation language”, “theory”, “ axiomatization” etc are sufficient to fully explain the results of scientific enquiry. The context of discovery includes human circumstances but these cannot contribute to the justification of science as a claim to knowledge. I argue that the arguments presented are crucially flawed and cannot serve to justify any principled demarcation or division of contexts. I argue that scientific knowledge may well be presented in an artificial language but this language cannot be demarcated from ordinary language. Scientific enquiry can be placed in a broader cognitive outlook supported by broader cultural practices and ordinary language.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
K
Department: 
Dept. of Sociology and Anthropology - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

Ordering conduct, conducting order : conduct disorder and the production of knowledge

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1997
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Theses (Dept. of Sociology and Anthropology) - / Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (Ph.D.)

The unmasking of civil society in Mexico : the EZLN discourse on democratic development

Author: 
Date created: 
1996
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Theses (Dept. of Sociology and Anthropology) - / Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)