Sociology and Anthropology, Department of

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Electric Micro-Mobilities Scoping Review [Data Set]

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-07-15
Abstract: 

In 2020, the authors received funding from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada Knowledge Synthesis Grants: Mobility and Public Transit competition. The primary output made possible by this funding is a scoping review of literature on the subject of electric micro-mobilities (EMMs) published between 2010-2021. This Excel document logs all literature found in library databases, Google Scholar, and general Google searches. Each entry contains author(s), year, title, database/location, source type, country/region, city/province/state, and type(s) of EMM.

Document type: 
Dataset
File(s): 

Evidence Brief: Youth and Public Transit

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-12-14
Abstract: 

This short report summarizes the literature related to youth and transit, with a focus on demand, barriers, youth advocacy, various types of passes (i.e., U-PASS, free or reduced-fares), and active transportation.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Talking Back: Trans Youth and Resilience in Action

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2020-05-12
Abstract: 

In 2015 the Gender Vectors research team received a major research grant to conduct research with and about transgender youth in the Greater Vancouver Area. A unique aspect of this research project involved combining social action research with the development of a prototype of a video game as a knowledge translation tool to depict the life experiences of trans youth. We draw on transformative gender justice theory to document and address the diminished life chances of and the need to promote resilience among trans youth in the region and more broadly, across Canada and the United States. This article provides an overview of the research project and concludes by identifying key insights relating to resiliency that resulted from 15 narrative interviews with transgender youth, focus group meetings with the Project’s Youth Advisory Council, and dialog from an intergenerational workshop for transgender youth and adult care/service providers and allies. These themes informed the creation of the prototype.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Free and Reduced-Fare Transportation for Youth

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-12-14
Abstract: 

This short report summarizes the literature related to free and reduced-fare transportation for youth, including motivations for such programs, Canadian initiatives, and assessments.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Youth and Public Transit: A Knowledge Synthesis of Recent Publications

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2021-12-14
Abstract: 

Historically, youth (13-25) have been one of the most active user groups of public transit in Canada, accounting for one-third of ridership nation-wide, and up to two-thirds in cities such as Moose Jaw, SK and Red Deer, AB (Canadian Urban Transit Association, 2004). Despite their high usage of public transportation, youth as a specific category of riders have received an underwhelming amount of focus by academics and transit authorities. This report synthesizes the last ten years of evidence, policy, and pilot projects related to youth as a public transportation user group in order to provide an up-to-date summary of the state of knowledge in this area. Youth and public transportation research is identified and evaluated, including data sources and gaps. Media coverage of the issue is also considered, as many of the concerns of youth, public debates, and pilot programs related to youth and public transit are only referenced in this format. The final section of this work consists of an evidence-based agenda for future research and policy, with an eye toward enhancing the equity of access to transit systems for youth riders.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Unsettled Belongings: Chinese Immigrants’ Mental Health Vulnerability as a Symptom of International Politics in the COVID-19 Pandemic

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2020-12-17
Abstract: 

The COVID-19 pandemic has led to unique mental health challenges for Chinese immigrants due to their cultural, social, and political ties with China, which responded to COVID-19 with controversial measures amid tensions with the Western world. These challenges manifest in three conditions at a time of crisis: racism that associates overseas Chinese with the coronavirus, Chinese immigrants’ “double unbelonging” with regard to both host societies and China, and social disapproval of political criticism among overseas Chinese. This article examines these three conditions by drawing on ethnography conducted in Canada as well as international online media. It uses theories in humanistic psychology, existential psychology, and hermeneutics to explain how, for Chinese immigrants, international political tensions are implicated in a range of mental health–related phenomena including identity, belonging, self-consciousness, shame, depression, and agency. Meanwhile, it offers theoretical discussions of how to make humanistic psychology more capable of addressing social and political issues.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Talking Back: Trans Youth and Resilience in Action

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2020-05-12
Abstract: 

In 2015 the Gender Vectors research team received a major research grant to conduct research with and about trans-gender youth in the Greater Vancouver Area. A unique aspect of this research project involved combining social action research with the development of a prototype of a video game as a knowledge translation tool to depict the life experiences of trans youth. We draw on transformative gender just-ice theory to document and address the diminished life chances of and the need to promote resilience among trans youth in the region and more broadly, across Canada and the United States. This article provides an overview of the research project and concludes by identifying key insights relating to resiliency that resulted from 15 narrative interviews with trans-gender youth, focus group meetings with the Project’s Youth Advisory  Council,  and  dialog  from  an inter-generational workshop  for  transgender  youth  and  adult care/service providers and allies. These themes informed the creation of the prototype.

Document type: 
Article

Ghosts and Shadows: A History of Racism in Canada

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2013-05-17
Abstract: 

A history of racism reinforces discrimination and exploitation of racialized immigrants in general and African-Canadians in particular. My paper contends that historically institutionalized structures are the ideological fulcrum from which ongoing socio-economic inequalities derive and retain their legitimacy. Specifically, I argue that the historically institutionalized system of slavery and ensuing systemic structures of racial discrimination negatively influence the incorporation of racialized immigrants into the Canadian labour market. A historically racially segmented labour market continues to uphold colour coded social and economic hierarchies. Although Canada’s point system ensures that immigrants are primarily selected on the basis of their skills and qualifications, many professionally trained and experienced racialized immigrants endure perpetual socio-economic constraints, characterized primarily by low-end, precarious forms of employment.  While not intended to serve as an exhaustive chronology, this essay draws on three historical periods of Black migration and experience in Canada: the first spans early sixteenth to the end of the eighteenth-century, the second dates from the nineteenth to mid-twentieth century, and the third extends from mid-twentieth century to the present. The following historical timeline traces the prevalence and enduring nature of systemic structures and substantiates Abigail Bakan’s (2008) suggestion that both “racism and a culture of hegemonic whiteness were and remain endemic to the Canadian state” (p. 6).

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Transgender Inclusion and the Changing Face of Lesbian Softball Leagues

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2010-04-01
Abstract: 

This article examines the re-negotiation of sex-based boundaries within the context of transgender/transsexual inclusion in North American lesbian softball leagues. Semi-structured interviews with transgender participants combined with participant observation have been undertaken. We focus on the ‘climate’ (Hall and Sandler, 1982) for transgender participation in lesbian softball leagues that have adopted radical (non sex-binary-based) transinclusive policies. The majority of our research participants report positive experiences of inclusion and our own observations inform us that trans participation has already changed the faces of these leagues to the extent that lesbian identity is being queered: it is shifting away, at least to some degree, from assumed biological commonality to cultural affinity. Positive experiences, however, were more uniformly reported by transgender women than by transmen.A number of transmen, while reporting experiences of inclusion, expressed both personal ambivalence about participating in lesbian sporting and non-sporting spaces and a desire for fuller inclusion in the form of sensitivity and awareness concerning the use of gendered pronouns and categorical invocations. Our study documents cultural processes of sex boundary re-negotiation. As such it builds on previous scholarship (Travers, 2006) that suggests that lesbian softball leagues with non-sex-binary based transinclusive policies may offer a model for queering mainstream sporting spaces away from the socially constructed categories of the two sex system.

Document type: 
Article

Parallel Subaltern Feminist Counterpublics in Cyberspace

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2003-06
Abstract: 

The historically exclusive nature of public spaces and discourses is beyond dispute. While feminist and “other” counterpublics have provided alternative ways of organizing public interaction and dialogue, these have remained largely invisible to nonparticipants. New information technologies afford new possibilities for feminist counterpublics to influence the norms of participation and boundaries between insiders and outsiders in mainstream public spaces. In this article I argue that feminist counterpublics in cyberspace are evidence of a new development in social discourse: the creation of subaltern parallel counterpublics distinguishable from oppositional/separatist counterpublics based, to differing degrees, on identity politics.

Document type: 
Article
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