Publishing Program - Theses, Dissertations, and other Required Graduate Degree Essays

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Role-Focused Process-Mapping for Documenting Software Systems Usage at Hemlock Printers

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2019-04-02
Abstract: 

This report introduces readers to the principles of process mapping, a flowchart technique widely used in manufacturing and engineering for diagnosis, analysis and improvement of processes and whose advantages can be applied to tasks carried out in Publishing. We base this exposition on the experience gained during the process mapping of Hemlock Printers Ltd. a Burnaby-based company with 50 years in the industry, which started a project to document its workflows and the way software applications were used to automatize them. We examine the nature of process maps, how the company was conceptualized for study and the ways to collect information used, followed by a step by step guide to draw these diagrams, ending with a detailed analysis of selected examples of workflows at Hemlock using these maps and how to apply them to identify problems and opportunities for improvement.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Juan Pablo Alperin
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: Publishing Program
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.Pub.

Library is the new publisher: Establishing workflows for library-based open educational resource production programs in post-secondary institutions across Canada and the United States

Author: 
Date created: 
2018-12-13
Abstract: 

As a response to increasing costs of textbooks for college students, post-secondary institutions are exploring new methods to make learning materials affordable for students. This has resulted in a surge of interest in the concept of open educational resources (OER), or freely accessible learning materials, the most prominent of which is the open textbook. Post-secondary institutions have begun to start their own OER production programs, often staffed by librarians and run through an institutional library. As the work that was traditionally done by publishers begins to move into the academic space, new OER coordinators are searching for answers for how to successfully run an OER production program. This report is an analysis of the workflows of six OER production programs run through the libraries of post-secondary institutions in the United States and Canada, and stands a record that can be built upon in the future in the efforts to formulate a standardized approach to running a successful OER production program using Pressbooks’ book production and distribution software.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Hannah McGregor
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: Publishing Program
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.Pub.

Distilling the Canadian Copyright Review 2018: One publisher's path through Canadian copyright and Canadian Coursepacks

Author: 
Date created: 
2018-12-17
Abstract: 

This report examines current academic publishing market in the light of the ongoing Statutory Review of Copyright Act of Canada (2018), and reconciles the testimonies presented before the review committee by the industry stakeholders. It focuses on the impact on academic publishing since the Copyright Modernization Act (2012) came into effect, which resulted in the education sector opting out of Access Copyright tariff. The report identifies the key concerns of the independent Canadian publishers: publishers’ and authors’ losses, interpretation of fair dealing guidelines, digital shift in content acquisition, institutional expenditure on Canadian content and the economics of digital environment. The report evaluates if a partnership between an independent Canadian publisher like Arsenal Pulp Press and an upcoming publishers’ consortium called the Canadian Coursepacks can help publishers recapture their academic sales revenues. The report highlights the future concerns for independent publishers in the absence of collective licensing and a need for publishers to re-think their distribution strategies, especially their sub-licensing agreements.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Suzanne Norman
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: Publishing Program
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.Pub.

Turning the page: An analysis of accessible publishing in Canada

Author: 
Date created: 
2018-12-20
Abstract: 

Unfortunately, not every Canadian book is accessible to every Canadian reader. Print disabilities (which include visual, learning, and physical disabilities) affect a significant portion of Canadian readers, and in 2018 Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) arranged a Working Group on Alternate Format Materials for Canadians with Print Disabilities to come up with a strategy for producing more print materials in Canada in accessible formats. The Canada Book Fund in the Department of Canadian Heritage conducted research on the topic to provide ESDC with accurate data as well as to further the Department’s knowledge of a very niche market that may be underserved. This report examines the landscape of accessible publishing in Canada: who it is for, how it is done, and how it could be done better. Following an analysis of the industry, this report provides suggestions as to how accessible publishing might be supported through the Government of Canada.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
John Maxwell
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: Publishing Program
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.Pub.

How Iceland Writers Retreat markets itself as an international writers event

Author: 
Date created: 
2018-12-10
Abstract: 

The first Iceland Writers Retreat (IWR) was held in 2014. It has since grown to be an annual event that boasts participants from around the globe, who travel to Iceland to learn from internationally renowned faculty, immerse themselves in the literary traditions of Iceland, and explore an unforgettable setting. This report outlines and examines Iceland Writers Retreat marketing efforts, particularly online. Further, it historicizes the beginning and inspirations of IWR, and delineates IWR’s role within both the landscape of international writing events and the liminal space it occupies between the Icelandic tourism industry and cultural sphere. It aims to outline marketing best practices that can be useful not only to other writing retreats and events, but also to any cultural organization that is moving their marketing efforts primarily online. Finally, it attempts to highlight opportunities for IWR to continue to grow their audience—both online and at the event.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Leanne Johnson
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: Publishing Program
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.Pub.

The role of the editor: The case of Springer

Author: 
Date created: 
2018-12-06
Abstract: 

Springer, as one of the largest commercial academic publishers, merged with Nature in 2015, and now has a new name: Springer Nature. The merger combines strength of two publishers, with strong book publishing plus strong journal publishing in one publisher. However, the merger does not affect the working modes of the editors at Springer or Nature. Different from the in-house editors at Nature who are handing peer-reviewing process of every article, what are the responsibilities of the editors at Springer? What skills should the editors at Springer have? How can one be a qualified editor at Springer? Facing the new trends in publishing, including big data, open access policies, information exposure, competitive markets, among others, what challenges are awaiting these editors? In particular, in the fast-growing Chinese market, with its enormous output of scientific documents, how can editors based in China work to address this challenge? This report describes the role of editors at Springer regarding the Chinese market, from skills to experiences and from opportunities to challenges.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
John Maxwell
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: Publishing Program
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.Pub.

Print book formats: A closer look at how Simon & Schuster Canada uses formats to find their readers

Author: 
Date created: 
2018-11-27
Abstract: 

When we read a book, we rarely give much thought to the format in which that book is published. But had the book not presented itself to us in a format that suited our taste and our pockets, we would probably not have picked it up. That’s basically what publishers do: they strive to position their books in the right form and with the right price so that they will find their intended readers. In the summer of 2018, during my professional placement at Simon & Schuster Canada, I learnt how format decisions impact the fate of books, and how the company made successes of certain books by changing the format from hardcover to trade paperback. This report is a culmination of my observations and learnings and is based on interviews I conducted with key members of the staff and data and information provided by Simon & Schuster Canada. The subject of print book formats is complex. My hope is that this report throws light on the state of formats as it stands today in Canada.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
John Maxwell
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: Publishing Program
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.Pub.

Knowledge management at LifeTree Media

Author: 
Date created: 
2018-10-30
Abstract: 

To survive in this age of globalization organizations need the capacity to retain, develop, systematize, and utilize their knowledge assets. The management of an organization’s knowledge through the processes of creating, sustaining, applying, sharing and renewing that knowledge to enhance organizational performance and create value is known as knowledge management. This project report focuses on the process of creating a knowledge management tool at LifeTree Media, and discusses the significance of the concept vis à vis the creation of a learning organization. It also includes feedback on the system collected from a questionnaire, which was completed by the company president.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
John Maxwell
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: Publishing Program
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.Pub.

Going national: Taking Cottage Life magazine across Canada

Author: 
Date created: 
2018-08-07
Abstract: 

Cottage Life has enjoyed success as a service and lifestyle magazine for Canadian cottage owners. But that success is mostly regional: 77% of its subscribers live in Ontario. In 2014, in an attempt to expand its readership, Cottage Life Media launched Cottage Life West, a new regional version with some shared and some original content. This new edition—not quite a distinct title—was a focused attempt to appeal to readers in Western Canada. But Cottage Life learned that its editorial approach doesn’t easily translate to Western readers, and catering to those readers from Toronto presents a unique set of hurdles. This is a story of a Toronto publisher gunning for a national readership and butting up against the challenges of regionalism. This report examines how a regional magazine attempts to grow into a national one, with an analysis of the editorial strategy and recommendations for other Ontario-based content publishers.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Hannah McGregor
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: Publishing Program
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.Pub.

Counterpublics revisited: A case study of the Vancouver Women's Library

Author: 
Date created: 
2018-08-16
Abstract: 

The notion of counterpublics is revisited by means of a detailed documentation of the founding in early 2017 of the Vancouver Women’s Library (VWL) and of its early history. Co-founded by the author, the VWL is described as a hands-on experience in the intellectual, socio-political and organisational dynamics of a twenty-first century continuation of the feminist bookstore movement, which saw its height in the 1970s and 80s. Following up on theoretical work done by Michael Warner, the author makes the point that the VWL provides a living instance of the formation of a feminist counterpublic. The recirculating of the unique relationship between women and books lead to the VWL positioning itself as a counterpublic for women. She recounts the spontaneous, cause-related support between women writers and publishers of earlier days and shows that it has been the VWLs aim to re-awaken this with an emphasis on alternative public circuits of information sharing. Moreover, the story is told of protests and controversy that arose when some of those who identified themselves within the same VWL counterpublic disagreed with its structuring. The conclusion is reached that a counterpublic is spontaneous, ungovernable and ontologically separate from its site of engagement.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
John Maxwell
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: Publishing Program
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.Pub.