Psychology - Theses, Dissertations, and other Required Graduate Degree Essays

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Empathy in conduct disordered youth

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1991
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Janet Strayer
Department: 
Arts and Social Sciences: Department of Psychology
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.

Hand-to-mouth behaviour in infants at 5 and 9 weeks

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1991
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Elinor W. Ames
Department: 
Arts and Social Sciences: Department of Psychology
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.

Investigation of a model for optimizing psychiatric hospital treatments. --

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1971
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
L.M. Kendall
Department: 
Arts and Social Sciences: Department of Psychology
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

The effects of binaural click integration as represented in the auditory brainstem evoked response (BER)

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1979
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Barry Beyerstein
Department: 
Arts and Social Sciences: Department of Psychology
Thesis type: 
(Dissertation) Ph.D.

Indexing adolescent adjustment problems : a comparison of four relative scoring procedures. --

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1972
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
L. M. Kendall
Department: 
Arts and Social Sciences: Psychology Department
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

U.K. social workers’ attitudes toward assisted death, policies guiding practice, and transformational collaboration: Holding fast to medico-ethical principles of beneficence, non-malfeasance and social justice

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2006
Abstract: 

Social workers play a key, but unacknowledged role regarding end-of-life decisions. The dearth of research on social workers’ attitudes toward assisted death is in stark contrast to the abundance of research on assisted death involving health care practitioners. Through analysis of data collected on members of the British Association of Social Workers (BASW) in 1998, this research examines attitudes of social workers toward assisted death (AD) including both voluntary euthanasia (VE) and assisted suicide (AS). Several hypotheses are developed from the available literature on assisted death involving social work and medical practice. The quantitative data are supplemented with written responses by BASW members. There is variation between social workers’ support of AD by country. English social workers are the most supportive, followed by Scottish, Welsh and Northern Ireland social workers. As a group, social workers support legalizing VE (72%) and AS (72.5%). A majority of social workers (69%) endorsed the Dutch model of legalized euthanasia. A minority of social workers (25%) indicated that they would report a colleague they suspected was involved in an assisted death. Catholics were less supportive of legalizing assisted death and the Dutch model of euthanasia but, regardless of religion, most social workers respect their clients’ wishes regarding end-of-life choices. Although less than 50% of social workers want to be involved in the decision-making making process with clients, over 65% indicated a willingness to engage in policy development regarding assisted death. Given their position, policy development is essential for social workers to be effective in end-of-life care. The theoretical perspective guiding the research shows that social workers support medico-ethical principles of autonomy, beneficence, non-malfeasance and social justice in assisted death. This finding places social workers in an important position regarding care of the dying. Future research should include the development and test of a collaborative model of training for all practitioners working with those facing end-of-life decisions. As a profession, social work must prepare itself for the challenges posed by growing populations of persons facing end-of-life decisions.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Brian Burtch
Department: 
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences: Special Arrangements
Thesis type: 
(Dissertation) Ph.D.

Assessment of visual discrimination in infants : comparison of a conditioning method with traditional preference methods

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1968
Abstract: 

The purpose of the present research was to develop a conditioning procedure with which to assess the visual discrimination, ability of infants, and to compare the results of this method with those obtained by traditional visual fixation preference methods. Infants twelve weeks of age were presented with black and white checkerboard stimuli varying on a physically graded dimension from 4x4- to 20x20 squares. Each stimulus was paired with a 2^x2^ checkerboard and measures of fixation time, span, and number of looks were recorded relative to each stimulus. Three groups of S_s were tested by the visual fixation preference procedures. In an effort to establish a procedure that was sensitive to the preferences of individual S_s, the stimulus presentation technique was varied among the groups. The results indicated, however, that the groups did not differ significantly with respect to the number of S_s evidencing discrimination. An operant conditioning procedure, designed to increase fixation time to one stimulus of a pair by presenting contingent visual stimulation as a reinforcer, was shown to be effective relative to a control procedure in which no reinforcement was administered. In comparison, with the visual fixation preference procedure, the experimental procedure was consistently superior in providing evidence of discrimination by individual 3_s. In comparisons with the criterion preference procedure, a modified preference procedure, the experimental procedure was usually iii superior for finding information about discrimination abilities of individual S_s. In addition, group results obtained for the preference studies indicated that infants twelve weeks of a,~'e most preferred a 10x10 checkerboard stimulus. These results were related to a theory of stimulus selection proposed by Dernber and Earl. Both zhe criterion preference procedure for groups of S_s, and the experimental procedure for individual S_s, indicated that the twelve-week-o-ld infants could discriminate the Ioxl6 from the checkerboard.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Jean Koepke
Department: 
Arts and Social Sciences: Department of Psychology
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.