Psychology - Theses, Dissertations, and other Required Graduate Degree Essays

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Assessing protective factors for non-suicidal self-injury: development of the barriers to self-injury inventory.

Date created: 
2010-06-18
Abstract: 

This study had two objectives: 1) To investigate reasons that an individual with a history of NSSI might refrain from NSSI and 2) to developed a measure (the Barriers to Self-Injury Inventory) to assess these barriers. In Study One, I used qualitative methods to elucidate motivations and situations that might prevent or dissuade an individual from engaging in NSSI. The reasons generated in Study One were combined to create an initial inventory of 115 items. In Study Two, this inventory was administered to 197 individuals with a history of NSSI. After confirming the dimensionality of the subscales and eliminating ill-fitting items, the refined measure consisted of 68 items, with 11 subscales and 3 super-ordinate scales. Subscales demonstrated acceptable reliability. Further, the scales demonstrate adequate convergent validity (i.e. positively correlated with coping, treatment engagement and reasons for living) and divergent validity (i.e. uncorrelated with suicidal behaviour).

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Alexander Chapman
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Department of Psychology
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.

Adolescent dating and disordered eating: The role of romantic relationship quality and previous sexual experience

Date created: 
2011-12-08
Abstract: 

Although adolescent dating has been associated with mental health problems, little is known about the association between dating and eating disorders. This study addressed the hypothesis that previous sexual experience and the quality of adolescents’ romantic relationships play a role in the association between dating and symptoms of eating disorders and depression. Participants included 75 girls, aged 12-19 (25 with an eating disorder, 25 with a depressive disorder, and 25 healthy controls). Study variables were assessed via questionnaires. Results indicated that involvement in a current, serious romantic relationship was associated with bulimic symptoms, particularly among girls who were sexually inexperienced. In addition, greater positive qualities of current relationships and greater negative qualities of previous relationships were associated with greater eating disorder symptoms. Future longitudinal studies should examine whether quality of romantic relationships and sexual experience represent risk factors for eating disorder symptoms among girls who are dating.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Shannon Zaitsoff
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Department of Psychology
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.

Neuropsychological and everyday predictors of medication adherence and employment status following kidney transplantation

Date created: 
2010-03-11
Abstract: 

The relative utility of traditional neuropsychological versus everyday cognitive measures in predicting specific functional outcomes is relatively unknown. I investigated the utility of both traditional neuropsychological and everyday measures of cognition in predicting medication adherence (n = 103) and employment status (n = 94) among kidney transplant (TX) recipients. Results indicated that both poorer performance on the Everyday Problem Solving test and a higher number of depressive symptoms were predictive of poorer self-reported medication adherence. Furthermore, being on antidepressant medication, having a higher number of depressive symptoms, and poorer performance on traditional neuropsychological measures were predictive of fewer hours worked. This study highlights the association of neurocognitive and psychosocial status with medication adherence and employment status following kidney transplantation, and the results suggest that the relative importance of traditional and everyday measures is dependent upon the outcome examined.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Wendy Thornton
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Department of Psychology
Thesis type: 
(Dissertation) Ph.D.

Human chorionic gonadotropin reduces proliferation but not survival of BrdU-labeled cells in the dentate gyrus in a rat model of pregnancy

Date created: 
2011-08-23
Abstract: 

Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and luteinizing hormone (LH) are proluteotropic hormones that signal via a common receptor (LH/CG receptor), which is expressed throughout the brain. hCG has also been linked to changes in cognition during human pregnancy, and to parallel behavioural effects in rat models. Additionally, LH treatment increases cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus in some non-pregnancy rat models. This suggests a possible role for hCG in regulating neurogenesis during pregnancy. To test this hypothesis, ovariectomized rats were implanted with silastic capsules to mimic the levels of estrogen and progesterone present in early pregnancy, and injected with BrdU to label dividing cells. Treatment with hCG resulted in significantly lowered cell proliferation in the dentate gyrus, but had no impact on 21 day cell survival. These results also suggest a mechanism underlying the relationship between hCG levels and changes in cognition during pregnancy.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Neil Watson
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Department of Psychology
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.

The co-construction of knowledge and identities of expert and novice in classroom talk

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2003
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
William Turnbull
Department: 
Arts and Social Sciences: Department of Psychology
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.

A search for balance : duality in the southern Andes of Peru as a factor in the life, works and aims of Jose Maria Arguedas

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1989
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
William Krane
Department: 
Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.

Risk and protective factors : male young offenders versus male youth in school

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2004
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Stephen Hart
Department: 
Arts and Social Sciences: Department of Psychology
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.

Sentencing Aboriginal offenders : progressive reforms or maintaining the status quo?cby Andrew Welsh.

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2004
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
James R.P. Ogloff
Department: 
Arts and Social Sciences: Department of Psychology
Thesis type: 
(Dissertation) Ph.D.

Sex offender treatment : an evaluation of the Stave Lake Correctional Centre program

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2004
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
James Ogloff
Department: 
Arts and Social Sciences: Department of Psychology
Thesis type: 
(Dissertation) Ph.D.

Police interrogation and criminal adjudication of child and adolescent defendants illlegal abilities, decisions, and standards

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2004
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Ronald Roesch
Department: 
Art: Department of Psychology
Thesis type: 
(Dissertation) Ph.D.