Political Science - Theses, Dissertations, and other Required Graduate Degree Essays

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A critique of Herbert Marcuse's concept of human liberation. --

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1971
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Hari P. Sharma
Department: 
Arts and Social Sciences: Political Science, Sociology and Anthropology.
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

Political manipulation and rewards in the Crowsnest Pass, Southern Alberta. --

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1971
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
A.H. Somjee
Department: 
Arts and Social Sciences: Political Science, Sociology and Anthropology.
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

Early forms of political activity among white women in British Columbia, 1880-1925. --

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1971
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Martin Robin
Department: 
Arts and Social Sciences: Political Science, Sociology and Anthropology)
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

The political party organization in a federal riding : a case-study of Burnaby-Coquitlam. --

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1966
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
T.B. Bottomore
Department: 
Arts and Social Sciences: Political Science, Sociology and Anthropology.
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

A context, categorization and measurement of international learning outcomes

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2006
Abstract: 

The movement of scholars to centres of learning - academic mobility - predates both the nation state and the university. As notions of statehood evolved, the state assumed responsibility for educating its citizenry, authority which has stood the test of time. Institutions evolved relying on external support in exchange for suasion over what was taught and to whom, evolving a dynamic symbiosis as all players realized positive outcomes from their engagement in education. In today's more complex context, each player continues to realize value in supporting education and in supporting international student mobility. This dissertation places the activity of mobility in historical, political, educational and global contexts that illustrate the evolving role of the state in supporting higher education, and the state's continuing attempts to influence the course of education through the more modern activity of student mobility. Trends such as globalization and massification are addressed, as is internationalization, to explain the rationale of the state for this continued engagement and the motivations of primary stakeholders - the state, the institution and the individual - to support study abroad. Positive outcomes are achieved by all players, hence their ongoing support. But what are these outcomes? A continuum of potential international learning outcomes is established from which the primary stakeholders choose hoped-for outcomes to motivate their engagement; these include economic and linguistic imperatives as well as intellectual, social and personal/attitudinal outcomes. The literature review leads to a methodology and research instrument used on a population of sojourners to test for the achievement of these outcomes and if achievement is significantly and causally related to the study abroad activity itself. or perhaps to some other variable. Data are conclusive and corroborate previous studies in showing positive intellectual and personal outcomes. Recommendations are made on the current research and for other research topics germane to the field of outcomes study. Of import is an exploration of the data's applicability for practitioners in pursuing outcomes-motivated programming, and the adaptation of new mobility models to replace much of the laissez-faire mobility programming common today, towards achieving sought-after outcomes and the internationalization objectives of institutions.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Jan Walls
Department: 
Arts and Social Sciences: Special Arrangements: Humanities, Education and Political Science - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
(Dissertation) Ph.D.

School for pass-whites.

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1967
Abstract: 

The argument is pursued that the social structure of a suburban high school in South Africa can be related to the racial policy of the central government, the mores of the residents of the suburb, and the career ambitions of school teachers. Data collected, mainly by means of observer participation, in the suburb and in the school, is adduced in support of the argument. Description proceeds from the general to the particular: from a broad overview of race-relations in the suburb to a portrayal of the school as a facilitating mechanism in the process of passing for White, thence to a discussion of the effects of this involvement on the formal and informal structure of the teaching staff. The socio-economic and cultural affinity between the suburb's Whites and Coloureds permits of the emergence of cross-cutting loyalties between the two groups based on the socio-economic categories of "respectable" and "roff" rather than on colour and provides a favourable environment for pass-Whites. Passing for White is not an act essentially different from the wider process of upward social mobility as found among the Coloured people. It is not an act but a process involving anticipatory socialization and the creation of conditions of face-to-face segmentary interaction in which Whites might make ad hoc decisions which cumulatively add verisimilitude to the passer's claim to White status. Passers find in White schools one of the segmentary roles necessary for their purpose; passing is and has been for some decades endemic to many schools in South Africa. The Principal of the school on which this study focuses enrols to ? his school pass-Whites "acceptable to the community." He does so in iv response to a declining White enrolment, to pressures exerted by a relatively "colour-blind" community, and to pressures exerted by a school board which makes use of the school as a "buffer" institution. At the same time, for fear of having the school reclassified "Coloured" by the provincial educational bureaucracy, he attempts to exclude the "obviously" Coloured??n when they have White identity cards and the support of the school board. Compounding the Principal's tribulations is the disparate social-class backgrounds of teachers and pupils which provide grounds for disputes over the goals of vocational and regulatory training and the means whereby these goals are to be attained. Disciplinary problems ensue, the school's extra-curriculum withers away, and the school class?? members of which owe no allegiance to houses, clubs or socieities such as might cut across their allegiance to the class??omes the pre-eminent unit of social structure in the school. Teachers, deprived of the means par excellence of dividing and ruling their pupils (the creation and manipulation of cross-cutting allegiances) face in the class-room a solidary body of pupils united in their opposition to middle-class adult authority; this fact further compounds the school's ill-repute. Association with a pass-White and working-class school imperils the career ambitions of teachers so difficulty is experienced in attracting recruits to the teaching staff and in moderating their rate of turnover. A marked cleavage develops between transient recruits and long-term teachers. Long-term teachers, prevented for various reasons from quitting the school, experience frustration and indulge in perennial scapegoating activity. The Principal, caught between opposing pressures exerted by parents, teachers and arms of government, forfeits the V respect of his teachers and loses ground in his battle with the Vice-Principal for ascendency over the staff.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
D.G. Bettison
Department: 
Arts and Social Sciences: Department of Political Science, Sociology and Anthropology
Thesis type: 
(Dissertation) Ph.D.

Political socialization of elementary school children : an empirical study.

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1968
Abstract: 

This study was designed to explore Che effects of visual perceptual abilities as determinants of school achievement and to provide some information about two tests in this area. Other aspects of achievement were also examined. The Bender Gestalt Test and the Raven Progressive Matrices (1947) were administered to two hundred and fifty-six children in kindergarten, grade one and grade two. One hundred and twenty-two children were classified as low achievers and one hundred and thirty-four as average achievers. .The effects of achievement level, grade level, age within grade, and sex, upon the children's visual perceptual performance scores were studied. The two achievement groups were examined to note similarities or differences in the children's date of birth, age within grade and sex. The results indicate that both the Bender Gestalt Test and the Raven Progressive Matrices discriminate significantly between children in the three grade levels and between children in the two achievement levels. Neither test significantly discriminated between male,and female or between young and old within the grades. Birthdate (May to August) did not relate significantly to achievement. Birthdate (September to January) did relate significantly to achievement as did age within grade. The sex of the children was also found to be significantly related to achievement' level. iv These results were discussed and implications for further research in the area of predictive visual perceptual screening devices were advanced. Implications for the study of the effects of sex, birthdate and age within grade on school achievement were also discussed.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
David C Potter
Department: 
Arts and Social Sciences: Department of Political Science, Sociology and Anthropology
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.

The controversy surrounding the Davis-Moore explanation of stratification.

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1968
Abstract: 

We attempt to apply Mannheim's discussion of the sociology of knowledge to the controversy surrounding the Davis-Moore argument. Mannheim distinguishes between the immanent and extrinsic interpretation of a body of intellectual knowledge, that is, between,on the one hand,interpretation in terms of the premises prescribed by an intellectual work, and on the other, while holding the basic premises in abeyance, in terms of its relationship to the wider existential situation. Extrinsic explanations seek to relate the thinker's political "perspective" to his position in the wide^ social system, mainly in terms of the "class" or social group, to which he belongs. For example, Mannheim interprets nineteenth century German conservative thought as a response, generated by the needs of the class to which its creators belonged, (the "declining bourgeois class") to the challenge to its position by another class ("the ascendant group.") We claim that, to a large degree, the controversy is explicable in terms of the conflict of political perspectives on the problem of social inequality, with the qualification that one area of the exchange is basically a conflict of methodological axioms which does not rmnlfest an underlying clash of political opinions. Perspectives are identified by the exaggeration of some facts about human societies, as generally conceived, to the exclusion of others; and, by the failure of proponents and critics alike to consider relevant empirical evidence and theoretical arguments presented by other thinkers. We claim that proponents adopt a conservative, their critics a liberal view of stratified inequalities. Further, when the perspectives of different contributors are viewed as representative of wider trends of the political thought of American intellectuals throughout the twentieth century, a new dimension of meaning is afforded the controversy. Thus, the implicitly conservative argument presented by Davis and Moore is viewed as part of the post-war conservative reaction to the radicalism of American liberal intellectuals during the early thirtie.s and to their committment after 1936, to N=w Deal measures to reduce the scale of prevailing social and economic inequalities. Criticisms of their argument are viewed as a liberal counter-attack, prompted by the intellectual articulation of conservative thought in the early fifties, and which reflect, in their essentially limited and defensive approach, the climate of opinion of American liberal intellectuals in the post-war period. Whilst many of Mannheim's statements are supported by our discussion, especially those concerning the development of conservative thought as a "counter-ideology," to meet the challenge of another alien and hostile ideology, his statement that the perspective of an intellectual work is determined by the needs and aspirations of the class or group to which its creator belongs, rraast be modified on the basis of our examination of major trends of intellectual thought in American society; The major developments in American political theory were not generated by the needs or aspirations of well-defined social groups, but by such variables as the changing conditions of the American economy, for example, the Great Depression, the New Deal reforms and the later recovery of the capitalist economy both at home and abroad during the post-war period; the prevailing mood of the American public as expressed in post-war conservatism; and, America's relationship to the rest of the world, particularly, the emergence of a polar confrontation between America and Russia.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
David C. Bettison
Department: 
Arts and Social Sciences: Department of Political Science, Sociology and Anthropology
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.