Political Science - Theses, Dissertations, and other Required Graduate Degree Essays

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The politics of federal territories : the case of the Yukon

Author: 
Date created: 
1978
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Simon Fraser University. Theses (Dept. of Political Science)
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

Representation in the British Columbia Legislature

Author: 
Date created: 
1977
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Simon Fraser University. Theses (Dept. of Political Science)
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

Globalisation, deregulation and financial services reform in Canada: Legislating Canada’s "Superbanks"

Date created: 
2006
Abstract: 

When analyses of globalisation first emerged, it was argued that globalisation would expand a "democratic deficit" by reducing the power of public officials to regulate economic activities. The pressures of global economic competition would constrain the range of available public policies. In the case of financial services, both international political economy approaches to globalisation and public policy scholarship argued that the sector produced a unique "esoteric politics" in which there would be little scope for public accountability. Global competitive pressures, the technical complexity of the sector, and the close relationship between large financial services companies and policymakers, isolated the sector from domestic political pressures. Despite these assumptions, the Canadian financial services sector has gone through a period of "re-politicisation" and re-regulation over the last decade. Sectoral policy outcomes are now more clearly driven by domestic political struggles than was the case in the past. This thesis argues that this "re-politicisation" is the direct long-tem consequence of the deregulatory changes of the 1980s initiated, ironically, in response to "globalisation" and the policy demands of Canada’s "big banks." Deregulation "opened" the policymaking environment to a wider array of organized interests. By collapsing the banking, insurance and securities policy subsystems into a single federal financial services policy sector, and by expanding the responsibility of Parliament in an environment of weak state capacity, deregulation unintentionally created an environment in which groups pursuing new regulatory policy goals have been able to influence government policy. While globalisation might have further curtailed the importance of domestic politics in this sector, the institutional changes associated with deregulation ultimately opened a traditionally-closed policy network. This evidence requires that we change our traditional analysis of the "closed" financial services policy network in Canada. It also suggests the utility of "mid level" theories, like policy networks analysis in explaining state responses to globalisation. The policy networks approach offers significant insights, overlooked in much conventional analysis of globalisation, regarding the importance of sectoral-specific domestic institutional arrangements in guiding how states will ultimately respond to the challenges and opportunities of globalisation.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Department of Political Science - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (Ph.D.)

Addressing China’s needs in the global intellectual property regime: Alternative knowledge sharing approaches

Author: 
Date created: 
2006
Abstract: 

Since its accession to the WTO, China has struggled to meet its commitments under the TRIPs (Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights) agreement which imposes strict intellectual property rights (IPRs), favouring the interests of developed countries. Despite internal and external pressure on Beijing to improve its standard of IPR protection, it remains the target of Western criticism for lax enforcement. Questioning the contemporary mainstream concept of intellectual property (IP), this study identifies alternative approaches to knowledge sharing that could address the needs of a developing country such as China. It argues that open IP initiatives could address some IPR problems within the Chinese context. They also could help to bridge the gap between developed countries like the U.S. and developing countries like China which have different perspectives on intellectual property.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Department of Political Science - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Research Project (M.A.)

‘Controlled by Canadians’ – Public process and the CRTC: Public participation, the community channel, and the regulation of Canada’s broadcasting system

Author: 
Date created: 
2006
Abstract: 

The Canadian Broadcasting Act of 1991 states the Canadian system should be ‘effectively owned and controlled by Canadians’. The Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission (CRTC) is the administrative body that is responsible for the regulation and supervision of Canada’s broadcasting system. This project examines the two aspects of the CRTC’s process open to public participation; the public hearing or public notice and the complaints process. The nature and extent of public participation in response Public notice 2001-129, which formed the basis for the CRTC’s 2002 policy framework for community media, was the focus of one part of this project. The project also examined the number and type of complaints filed with the CRTC regarding Delta and Shaw cable systems from 2002-2006. The research found that the form of the community channel influences participation in the policy process and the structure of the complaints process restricts the nature of the complaints filed.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Department of Political Science - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Research Project (M.A.)