Political Science - Theses, Dissertations, and other Required Graduate Degree Essays

Receive updates for this collection

Marketized soldiering: how private military companies challenge global governance, erode accountability and exacerbate conflict

Author: 
Date created: 
2006
Abstract: 

The rise of the modern private military industry in the 1990s is explained and claims about the benefits and hazards of privatized military force are evaluated from a public interest perspective. Evidence about the cost effectiveness of employing private military companies (PMCs) is found to be inconclusive, although outsourcing has the potential to increase military flexibility and provide states with newly emerging capabilities in the short run. Governments are shown to have "hidden" motives for outsourcing military functions. It is argued that most benefits of privatization are conditional and that PMC-related hazards threaten to do long-term damage to the rule of law (both nationally and internationally), to the militaries which most rely on private contractors and to the fabric of constitutional democracy.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Department of Political Science - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Research Project (M.A.)

Japan's postwar rearmament and reactions of East Asian states

Author: 
Date created: 
1986
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Theses (Dept. of Political Science) / Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

Public involvement & policy influence In British Columbia

Author: 
Date created: 
2006
Abstract: 

The public involvement process has attracted a great deal of interest as a means of including the public in important decisions and providing innovative solutions to challenging issues. However, there has not been a sufficient amount of inquiry into the influence public involvement actually has on policy outcomes. This research project addresses this issue by examining four public involvement cases in British Columbia to assess what forms of public involvement are most influential. The evidence in the cases reveal that the design of the process as well as the stage that public involvement occurs in the policy cycle are important variables that result in policy influence. The findings indicate that public involvement is a useful policy instrument that for designing policy. Policymakers should consider using this method when public input is necessary for policy alteration.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Department of Political Science - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Research Project (M.A.)

Organizational change in the RCMP : a longitudinal study

Author: 
Date created: 
1984
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Theses (Dept. of Political Science) / Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

Strategic decision making and the crown corporation : a case study of Petro-Canada

Author: 
Date created: 
1983
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Theses (Dept. of Political Science) / Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

Development or destruction?: the Uighurs of Xinjiang and China's Open Up the West Project

Author: 
Date created: 
2006
Abstract: 

The Chinese government launched the Western Development Program (WDP) in 1999 in response to the wealth disparity between eastern and western China. This paper examines the WDP's effects on the Uighurs, a Turkic Muslim minority group in Xinjiang province. Broadly, this essay addresses the relationship between economic development and nationalism, examining Beijing's claim that the WDP will improve the Uighurs' economic situation, hence diminishing Uighur nationalism. I argue that the literature does not support this claim. Economic growth will not diminish Uighur nationalism. Moreover, the WDP's benefits in Xinjiang have flowed to Han Chinese migrants, leaving the Uighurs economically disadvantaged. Beijing has encouraged the migration of large numbers of Han Chinese to Xinjiang. Combined with Uighurs' sense of historical injustice at the hands of China and Beijing's ongoing repression in Xinjiang, CCP policies exacerbate Uighur anger and cause nationalism to increase.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Department of Political Science - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Research Project (M.A.)

Civil society in developing countries: an analysis of donor interventions

Author: 
Date created: 
2006
Abstract: 

The paper presents a critical analysis of the civil society discourse emanating from development agencies, and investigates its implications for political and civil society in developing countries. Civil society is a normative ideal, a political concept, as well as a political/social reality and can be conceptualized in multiple ways. Operationalizing the concept for policy purpose is a normative process that privileges the associational view of civil society. This largely ignores the role of ‘non voluntary’ groups. In most developing countries ascriptive ties are an essential part of the fabric of society; ethnic, communal and religious groups are influential political and social actors. The paper highlights the historical and cultural specificity of the discourse of civil society. It argues for a more inclusive conceptualization of civil society, that acknowledges the importance of local forms of collective action.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Department of Political Science - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Research Project (M.A.)