Public Policy - Theses, Dissertations, and other Required Graduate Degree Essays

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Easing demoviction: Tenant relocation policies in Vancouver and Burnaby

Author: 
Date created: 
2019-04-05
Abstract: 

A proliferation of demolition-related displacement has affected renters across the Metro Vancouver area. This study examined tenant relocation assistance in Burnaby and Vancouver, the two municipalities that have been the most heavily impacted by this trend. A jurisdictional scan of San Francisco, Toronto, and Austin is used to uncover policy responses in areas that are facing comparable levels of redevelopment. Interviews with key informants are supplemented with policy and planning documents to provide further context to the ways in which governments are coping with an aging stock of purpose-built rental housing. This study recommends that local governments further assist the most vulnerable displaced tenants through the provision of subsidies.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Josh Gordon
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: School of Public Policy
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.P.P.

The future of VSB schools: funding schools during declining and uneven enrollment

Author: 
Date created: 
2019-04-10
Abstract: 

In recent years the management of Vancouver School Board (VSB) schools has generated significant public and media attention. VSB district enrollment has declined significantly over the past 20 years while Vancouver’s population has increased. Further, enrollment has increased in areas of urban development creating planning challenges where there are too many students in some schools and too few elsewhere. The Province expects the VSB to effectively manage their enrollment and have prioritized seismic upgrades for schools with high enrollment. This has led to potential school closures, catchment boundary changes, and 43 schools are listed as future priorities for seismic upgrades. This capstone investigates solutions to the VSB’s uneven enrollment challenges and related capital funding shortfalls through a jurisdictional scan, interviews, and a mapping study using VSB enrollment data. A recommendation is made for the VSB to consult the public on partial land leases and implement School Site Acquisition Charges.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Josh Gordon
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: School of Public Policy
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.P.P.

Policies to encourage commuting by electric bicycle in Metro Vancouer

Author: 
Date created: 
2014-03-04
Abstract: 

Metro Vancouver currently has very low rates of cycling due to hilly terrain, wet winters, and an auto-centric urban design. Metro Vancouverites instead travel primarily by gasoline powered motor vehicles, creating traffic congestion and air pollution. For many commuters electric bicycles present a feasible alternative to vehicle commuting, including those living in hilly areas. If enough people started commuting by electric bicycles the societal benefits could be significant. Four policies that would encourage more people to commute by electric bicycle on a regular basis are considered. A provincial e-bike to work tax incentive and loan program is recommended as the policy most likely to increase rates of bicycle commuting while being cost-efficient for government and providing affordable access to e-bikes for most vehicle commuters.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Maureen Maloney
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: School of Public Policy
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.P.P.

Handle with care: Assessing Canadian medical policy for children with intersex variations

Date created: 
2019-04-09
Abstract: 

It is estimated that 1 in 2000 babies are born with atypical genitalia, also known as an intersex variation. In Canada, parents can consent to elective surgery to make the genitalia appear more typically female or male, but there is a growing recognition of the physical and psychological harms associated with these surgeries being performed on children too young to consent. The ability of parents to provide informed consent is hindered for reasons including a lack of information about the child’s wishes and potential framing bias by doctors. To minimize exposure to the significant risks associated with such procedures, it is recommended that Canada conduct a consultation process and a commission of inquiry to investigate current practices associated with elective genital surgeries on infants and young children. Based on those processes, minimum standards for psychological support should be established, and restrictions on early surgeries should be considered.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Josh Gordon
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: School of Public Policy
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.P.P.

Regulating peer-to-business lending in Canada

Author: 
Date created: 
2019-04-09
Abstract: 

Peer-to-Business Lending (P2BL) is a sub-set of the Financial Technology (Fintech) sector that allows investors to lend money to businesses through online portals run by a third party. P2BL provides a potential alternative source of financing for Canadian small businesses that are underserved by traditional financial institutions. However, Canada’s adoption of P2BL, measured in values of loans issued, significantly lags many of its peers who have developed mature online lending industries. This study focuses on Canadian securities regulation applicable to P2BL to identify issues with the current regulatory regime. A case study methodology is used to examine the United Kingdom, Singapore, and Australia to identify potential policy options to implement in Canada. These policy options are analyzed to determine responsible ways encourage innovation and growth in the Canadian P2BL sector.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Dominique Gross
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: School of Public Policy
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.P.P.

No ordinary women: How Canada can increase the number of women serving in UN peace operations

Author: 
Date created: 
2019-03-05
Abstract: 

Ever since the passage of United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325, the international body has committed itself to strengthening the role of women in all aspects of conflict resolution. However, female participation in peacekeeping has stagnated, and only a small percentage of military members deployed on UN peace operations are women. This research examines women's participation in peacekeeping from a public policy perspective and presents a number of policy options that would allow Canada to increase the proportion of uniformed female personnel deployed on modern peacekeeping operations. The research found that the main factors associated with the low percentage of female peacekeepers include: the small numbers of women within the armed forces who can be deployed as peacekeepers; a culture within the military that is hostile towards women, and; the fact that Canada has not fully recommitted itself to UN peacekeeping.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Maureen Maloney
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: School of Public Policy
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.P.P.

Connecting Canadians: Ensuring universal access to wireless services

Author: 
Date created: 
2019-04-10
Abstract: 

The market for wireless services in Canada is characterized by the presence of significant market power of the three national service providers: Bell, Rogers and Telus. This reduces consumer welfare through reduced access to high quality wireless services in underserved areas. I conduct an empirical analysis to find that reduced mobility of subscribers, as illustrated by the low churn rate, contributes to greater profit margins, and thus market power. Using this and information gathered from expert interviews, I identify low subscriber mobility, and unutilized spectrum owing to the existing regulatory framework as factors contributing to welfare loss. I recommend that ISED create Tier 5 service areas for spectrum licenses immediately. I also recommend that ISED create a secondary market for unused spectrum once the Tier 5 service areas are fully implemented. Together these policy recommendations will ensure universal access to wireless services for all Canadians and increase welfare.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Dominique Gross
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: School of Public Policy
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.P.P.

Improving access to treatment for opioid addiction in B.C.: An assessment of policy options

Author: 
Date created: 
2019-03-15
Abstract: 

British Columbia is currently experiencing an opioid overdose crisis. Accessibility of treatment is integral to reducing overdoses among individuals struggling with addiction and those who decide to reach out for help. However, these individuals face considerable barriers to accessing treatment. This study examines these barriers and proposes policy options to improve access to treatment for opioid addiction in B.C. Policy options are developed and analyzed through conducting a case study analysis, expert interviews, and an analysis of secondary focus group data with individuals who have lived and living experience of substance use. Policy options are evaluated using a multi-criteria analysis. Based on the analysis, this study recommends the implementation of multi-year grant funding to peer support programs and the creation an addictions unit within the existing provincial telehealth network.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Marina Adshade
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: School of Public Policy
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.P.P.

The cost of delivery: Governing gestational surrogacy in Canada

Author: 
Date created: 
2019-03-13
Abstract: 

There is a lack of access to surrogacy services within Canada, restricting the reproductive freedoms of surrogates and intended parents, and pushing intended parents into international markets. This study provides a review of surrogacy issues in the Canadian context, presents case studies comparing Canada’s surrogacy policies and outcomes with those of California and the UK, and delivers original findings from twenty-four key informant interviews. Policy options to address the lack of access to surrogacy services in Canada and criteria for evaluating these options are distilled from the evidence. Analysis of the policy options finds that concerns associated with decriminalizing paid surrogacy are outweighed by the benefits such a system would deliver. It is recommended that in order to address the problem of a lack of access to surrogacy services within Canada, the federal government should move to decriminalize payments for surrogacy services.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Olena Hankivsky
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: School of Public Policy
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.P.P.

Developing a policy to address anti-Indigenous racism in health care

Author: 
Date created: 
2019-03-19
Abstract: 

Indigenous peoples face negative health outcomes in comparison to the rest of the Canadian population, which is a result of race-based colonial policies and legislation, such as the Indian Act, that continue to effect Indigenous peoples’ health. This capstone project draws on Anti-Racism Theory and Tribal Critical Race theory as they highlight Indigenous perspectives of history, colonization, as well as the systemic nature of anti-Indigenous racism. In examining policies, policy statements, and declarations of commitment, a critical analysis is provided of policy discourses currently in place within health authorities. Through six semi-structured interviews with health authority officials, this research locates a set of policy alternatives designed to address the oppression and harm faced by Indigenous peoples within health care systems in British Columbia. In taking an Indigenous health policy perspective, this policy analysis project lists recommendations towards implementing various initiatives in working towards a policy to address anti-Indigenous racism.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Maureen Maloney
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: School of Public Policy
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.P.P.