Public Policy - Theses, Dissertations, and other Required Graduate Degree Essays

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The Road to Safety: Licensing Policy for Older Drivers in British Columbia

Date created: 
2016-03-15
Abstract: 

As individuals age they are more likely to develop medical conditions that may affect their ability to drive safety. British Columbia’s population is aging and the increasing proportion of older drivers pose a risk to their own individual and public safety. Descriptive statistics for British Columbia illustrate the risks older drivers present. Policies instituted in three other provinces provide examples of the various policy tools available for managing this issue, and interviews with regulators and researchers supplement the information. Analysis of four policy options concludes that British Columbia should adopt an older driver licensing regime similar to Ontario’s, with in-person screening sessions for individuals at the age of 80, and every two years after.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Nancy Olewiler
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: School of Public Policy
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.P.P.

Liquid assets: The Value of North Eastern British Columbia’s Groundwater Resources in the Face of Climate Change and Competing Uses

Date created: 
2016-04-04
Abstract: 

Northeastern British Columbia will experience future groundwater scarcity as a result of climate change and competing uses of water. The Government of British Columbia (BC) now regulates groundwater for the first time in history through the Water Sustainability Act (WSA). The WSA allocates water based on a first-in-time, first-in-right system which does not promote sustainability or efficiency.This study uses lessons learned from water management in Australia’s Murray-Darling Basin, Alberta’s South Saskatchewan River Basin, California’s Kern County Subbasin, and Colorado’s Denver Basin to formulate policy options for sustainable and efficient groundwater management in BC.This study recommends that the BC Government begin a water market pilot program, continue to collect data about BC’s water, begin a groundwater banking feasibility study, and increase the price of water to capture more rents.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Nancy Olewiler
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: School of Public Policy
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.P.P.

Navigating the pitfalls of the refugee dream: Understanding the integration issues faced by Somali Canadian male youth

Author: 
Date created: 
2015-12-10
Abstract: 

This capstone explores the integration challenges faced by Somali Canadian male youth in Canada as they have been experiencing issues leading to deviant and/or criminal behavior. Using literature, quantitative data analysis and qualitative semi-structured interviews analyzed via thematic analysis, this study examines how Somali Canadian male youth experience integration into Canadian society and become shaped by political, social and environmental conditions that differ from Somalia. Results from this study reveal that Somali Canadian male youth deviance and criminality is affected by 1) identity issues stemming from culture shock and intersectional discrimination (cultural, religious and racial), 2) lack of parental integration into Canadian society, and 3) post-migration socioeconomic challenges. These findings highlight the need for policy options that support the building of a healthy self-image of Somali Canadian male youth and empower Somali refugee parents to advocate for themselves and their children. This study proposes six policy options (categorized as education, healthcare, and social policy) centered on educational attainment, community and leisure engagement, and support for Somali refugee parents that may reduce deviant and/or criminal behavior in Somali Canadian male youth.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Maureen Maloney
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: School of Public Policy
Thesis type: 
(Capstone) M.P.P.

Waterfowl Management Technique in Delta, British Columbia: Balancing the Perspectives of Farmers and Waterfowl Advocates

Date created: 
2010-03-30
Abstract: 

In this study, I investigate methods of addressing the issue of migratory waterfowl damage to farms in Delta, BC. I examine the waterfowl management policies of British Columbia, namely the Delta Forage Compensation, Mitigation and Monitoring Project, and those of the prairie provinces. My analysis of the programs in the prairie provinces reveals that they share important characteristics related to compensation. Drawing on these findings, I propose four policy alternatives. After evaluating these alternatives, I recommend that British Columbia augment the current Delta Forage Compensation, Mitigation and Monitoring Project with enhanced mitigative schemes in the form of increased cost-shared lure and cover crop. Additionally, I recommend that BC adopts its own Canada-BC Waterfowl Damage Compensation Program modeled after Waterfowl Damage Compensation Programs in Alberta, Manitoba and Saskatchewan.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
J. Rhys Kesselman
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences:
Thesis type: 
(Capstone) M.P.P.

Tailings Management in the Alberta Oil Sands: Mitigating the Risk of Pond Failure

Date created: 
2015-05-07
Abstract: 

Alberta has a prosperous oil industry with large reserves of oil sands. The oil sands are mined and produce substantial amounts of waste (tailings) needing to be stored in tailings ponds. With a growing number of tailings ponds across the province, the possibility of a pond failure increases. As such, there is a rising concern for the environment, surrounding communities and existing infrastructure. There is thus a need for Alberta to have strategies in place to mitigate the risk of a pond failure. Case studies analysis and a survey of academic literature identify key components and categories of successful tailings management from which three policy options are established and analyzed: dewatered tailings, risk assessment and hazard identifications, and publicly available emergency response plans. A final policy recommendation is made to implement emergency response plans, if it is only feasible to select one option. However, a second recommendation is made to implement all three policies as the most likely way of addressing the complex issue of tailings pond failures.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Dominique Gross
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences:
Thesis type: 
(Capstone) M.P.P.

The Bloody Truth: Exploring the cost-effectiveness of adult hemophilia in British-Columbia

Author: 
Date created: 
2015-04-17
Abstract: 

Severe forms of bleeding disorders are on the rise across the country and the ability to properly identify, monitor and manage this group is important not only for their future health outcomes, but also to contain the cost of expensive blood products and long-term care. Through policy innovation there is potential to improve the effectiveness of care in British Columbia at modest increase in cost. This study undertakes qualitative interviews, a detailed cost analysis of options and case studies. Findings from interviews suggest concerns over inadequate present human resources in the St. Paul’s hemophilia centre, inadequate interaction between patient and staff, and inadequate patient education on prophylactic care. The outcome of the analysis indicates that some increase in human resources would provide benefits at modest incremental cost, and generate some offsetting cost savings.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
John Richards
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences:
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.P.P.

Cannabis in British Columbia: How Can We Take the High Road?

Author: 
Date created: 
2015-03-25
Abstract: 

This study examines how to reduce the harms and enhance the benefits that are produced by cannabis legislation in British Columbia. Criminalization of recreational cannabis aims to decrease demand. However, prior research reveals that this approach has little effect on usage rates. Although there are hazards associated with cannabis use, studies suggest that alcohol and tobacco consumption are more dangerous, yet it is legal to possess those drugs. Furthermore, the status quo allows criminal organizations to capture sizeable tax-free profits, which are frequently used to fund other unlawful activities. Cannabis prohibition also increases violence and elevates risks related to unsafe cultivation and storage. A cross jurisdictional analysis and expert interviews are used to identify and assess policy alternatives. The results indicate that while cannabis legalization is the most preferable option, provincial decriminalization has a greater likelihood of being accepted by government and the public.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Maureen Maloney
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences:
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.P.P.

Building stability into BC First Nations economies: the role of governance and community

Date created: 
2015-04-14
Abstract: 

First Nations economic development is widely understood to be a means to achieving self-sufficiency and self-determination. However, existing literature does not adequately address unique challenges and opportunities of remote First Nations in British Columbia. The study focuses on governance policy at the First Nation level to foster strategic alignment of institutions and community engagement. Findings suggest that governance institutions such as the band council and economic development corporation must be strategically aligned to best capitalize on development projects within their respective territory. More importantly, sustainable economic development hinges on community support for development projects. This study argues that community support is best achieved through rigorous reporting and performance measures by the economic development corporation.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Joshua Gordon
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences:
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.P.P.

Examining Factors of Success for Aboriginal Students in K-12 Educational Systems in British Columbia, Saskatchewan and Yukon

Date created: 
2015-04-20
Abstract: 

Aboriginal education is a complex system of governance compromises, overlapping jurisdictions and multi-party agreements. The future of Aboriginal education is a dim one at present. Evidence from research has shown educational systems, for the most part, are failing Aboriginal students and creating education disparities between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal students. To narrow these disparities, the following goals need to be a top priority: increasing academic performance, meeting cultural goals, and improving the management of reserve schools. A review of the literature on Aboriginal education, expert interviews with practitioners working with Aboriginal students in B.C., Saskatchewan and Yukon, were undertaken for this research. The research examines successful innovations, and barriers identified in the literature and noted by interview participants. From this, two policy approaches were identified that could be adopted to mitigate disparities—tripartite agreements and a voluntary incentive-based approach pursued by the federal Aboriginal Affairs ministry where tripartite agreements are inappropriate.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
John Richards
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences:
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.P.P.

No Roads to Riches: Meeting Future Travel Demand in Alberta

Date created: 
2015-04-08
Abstract: 

Within Canada, Alberta is projected to be one fastest growing provinces, both in demographics and size of its economy. If current trends continue, its transportation network will need to grow significantly to facilitate the future movement of goods and people. This study looks specifically at the transportation corridor between Alberta’s two largest cities of Edmonton and Calgary. This study’s projections and highway capacity analysis predict that the main highway between the two cities will not be able to meet future demand; as a result, commercial traffic movements will halt and will severely hinder the Albertan Economy. This study looks at three different infrastructure investments to accommodate future traffic growth, including addition lane upgrades, bypass routes, and a high speed rail line. The results of multi criteria analysis finds that construction of additional lanes upgrades will maintain traffic flow within the Edmonton Calgary transportation corridor.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Dominique Gross
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences:
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.P.P.