Public Policy - Theses, Dissertations, and other Required Graduate Degree Essays

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Health care access for temporary migrant farmworkers Canada

Author: 
Date created: 
2020-04-14
Abstract: 

Temporary migrant farmworkers have been coming to Canada through the Seasonal Agricultural Workers Program (SAWP) since 1966. Since then, the program has greatly expanded and has become a cornerstone of Canadian agricultural production, as migrant workers fill job needs Canadian workers do not. An identified issue, however, is that some temporary migrant workers experience barriers to accessing health care during their work terms in Canada. This capstone employs two central methodologies: a literature review, which includes a jurisdictional scan, and a set of interviews. The aim of this capstone is to contribute to the body of knowledge on healthcare access for SAWP participants and suggest policy options to reduce the barriers temporary migrant farmworkers experience when attempting to access health care in Canada.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Maureen Maloney
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: School of Public Policy
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.P.P.

Canadian’t: Policy options to address birthright citizenship for tourists

Date created: 
2020-03-23
Abstract: 

There has been growing concern about the phenomenon of “birth tourism” in Canada. Birth tourism refers to foreign non-residents arriving in Canada on tourist visas with the intention of giving birth, so that their children benefit from birthright citizenship. Although this practice has occurred for decades throughout the world, many countries have adjusted their birthright citizenship laws to prevent it. Consequently, Canada is now one of only two developed countries to still have birthright citizenship. Although the long-term outcomes of birth tourism are not well understood, the practice represents a challenge to the integrity of the immigration system. This capstone research explores the issue with the aim of evaluating possible policy responses. It conducts a literature review, examines case studies, and draws on expert interviews. Four policy options are presented and evaluated. The capstone recommends making eligibility for birthright citizenship conditional on the possession of a Social Insurance Number.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Josh Gordon
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: School of Public Policy
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.P.P.

Enhancing consumer choice and competition in American beer markets: An analysis of vertical restraints on craft brewer entry and growth

Author: 
Date created: 
2020-04-01
Abstract: 

Craft breweries have never been more prominent in the American beer industry. Nevertheless, major distribution networks remain dominated by large brewing conglomerates, and many consumers do not have access to a wide variety of craft beers. This situation is largely the product of “three-tier” distribution systems, which were designed in the post-Prohibition era to prevent vertical integration between brewers and retailers. This paper identifies three primary vertical restraints on market entry and growth for craft brewers: large brewing conglomerates’ anti-competitive practices in influencing wholesalers’ brand portfolios, franchise laws restricting a small brewer’s ability to alter or terminate their contract with a wholesaler and unprecedented consolidation in the corporate brewing sector. It conducts an evaluation of potential policies to mitigate such restraints and thereby expand choice and competition in American beer markets. It recommends that brewers comprising a small proportion of a distributor’s business be exempted from state franchise laws.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Josh Gordon
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: School of Public Policy
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.P.P.

Inequitable fertilization: Improving access to assisted reproductive technologies in British Columbia

Author: 
Date created: 
2020-03-02
Abstract: 

Advances in assisted reproductive technologies (ART) and growing rates of medical and circumstantial infertility have led to increased demand for in vitro fertilization (IVF). The financial, geographic and social barriers associated with IVF raise significant and sometimes prohibitive challenges for those pursuing treatment in BC. The procedure is also associated with an elevated multiple births rate, which poses health risks for individuals, as well as high healthcare costs for governments. This capstone examines access to IVF across the Province and assesses multiple options to address the inequities faced by those experiencing different forms of infertility. Methodologies include an original survey of British Columbians experiencing infertility, literature review, jurisdictional scan, and interviews with subject matter experts. Three policy aspects are assessed using criteria and measures to identify strengths, weaknesses, and trade-offs. The recommendation includes options for eligibility constraints, embryo transfer policies, and funding models.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Doug McArthur
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: School of Public Policy
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.P.P.

Sour grapes: Mitigating the risk of overtourism in British Columbia’s eno-tourism

Author: 
Date created: 
2020-03-04
Abstract: 

The economic health of regions dependent on tourism are threatened by overtourism. Through the use of sustainable development practices, this risk can be mitigated. This study examines the sustainability of the Okanagan Valley, the dominant wine tourism destination in British Columbia. Using case studies, the Okanagan is compared with wine tourism regions around the world. This study finds that there is a relatively low amount of sustainability in the Okanagan relative to other wine regions. Following this, this study finds that the Okanagan’s high degree of seasonality, lack of training opportunities, and lack of standardized practices have the greatest potential for improvement. Three policies are proposed and analyzed to address these shortcomings: an expansion of educational programs, sustainability standards, and off-season event grants. As a result of this analysis, a policy package containing elements of all three policy proposals is recommended.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Dominique Gross
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: School of Public Policy
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.P.P.

Supporting young oil and gas workers in Alberta: Lessons from just transition

Author: 
Date created: 
2020-04-15
Abstract: 

Young oil and gas workers in Alberta were significantly affected by the 2014 crash in the price of oil and the ensuing downturn. With oil and gas employment unlikely to return to former levels, continued job losses, and high unemployment rates among young male workers in Alberta, this group faces significant labour market challenges. This study examines potential improvements to Alberta’s employment services system and its active labour market policies to better support young oil and gas workers in their adjustment. It employs a literature review and multiple case study analysis to identify and evaluate policy options, taking lessons from research on Just Transition. This study recommends a skills matching tool and training grant, to be implemented alongside economic diversification initiatives.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Nancy Olewiler
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: School of Public Policy
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.P.P.

Making the most of mandatory case reviews: An examination of serious injury and death reviews for youth receiving intervention services in Alberta

Author: 
Date created: 
2020-03-26
Abstract: 

Case Reviews for injuries and deaths of youth receiving protection services are supposed to increase accountability and improve circumstances for children and youth. However, the form that reviews take and the associated recommendations can contribute to a blame culture that undermines public trust and negatively impacts decisions made by protection workers. Balancing accountability with a focus on learning can increase the positive gains from case reviews and allow reviews to highlight effective case work that can provide context to perceived failures of child protection services. This paper examines the impact of increased case review requirements in Alberta, Canada and considers policy options for future development. Mandatory reviews in Alberta can increase opportunities to learn from tragedies. A searchable database of findings gained from case reviews could increase the value of Alberta’s existing focus on industry learning, by making information more accessible to case workers and clinicians.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Doug McArthur
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: School of Public Policy
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.P.P.

Suite dreams: Tools to expand the supply of affordable housing in northern Canada

Author: 
Date created: 
2020-03-24
Abstract: 

There is a severe shortage of affordable housing, as well as a demonstrated demand for such options. Unique cultural, regional and resource-based concerns specific to the North increase the complexity of building new housing in the regions. This study examined housing supply expansion challenges in the North. A proforma analysis of a sample affordable housing project was presented to show where the bulk of construction and development costs are concentrated. Three case studies were conducted to present successful and innovative financing, partnership and design housing expansion tools. The purpose of this case study is to gain insight into other tools that might be applicable to a rural context in northern regions. Following this, three policy options are analyzed for their applicability to the North. Based on this analysis, offsite construction, including both modular and prefabricated housing, coupled with a pilot program are recommended to address the lag in supply side housing expansion in the North.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Dominique Gross
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: School of Public Policy
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.P.P.

Scaling up: Assessing the CleanBC 15% renewable gas target

Author: 
Date created: 
2020-03-25
Abstract: 

As conventional natural gas is a fossil fuel that contributes heavily towards carbon emissions, the government of British Columbia is targeting this issue by instituting a 15% requirement of renewable gases to be blended in with conventional natural gas by 2030 to reduce carbon emissions. One such renewable gas, Renewable Natural Gas (RNG), is currently available and being produced in BC and so would be the major contributor in achieving the 15% target. Current production of RNG is insufficient to meet the target. This paper assesses the challenges of scaling up RNG by conducting a comparative case study of Germany, the United Kingdom and California, and a mixed methods approach involving interviews, a literature review and a study of utility rate design. Four policy options are evaluated to address the barriers for RNG in achieving the 15% target. Based on this analysis, a policy shotgun approach is recommended.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Nancy Olewiler
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: School of Public Policy
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.P.P.

The blunt truth: Industrial safety in cannabis growing facilities

Author: 
Date created: 
2020-04-02
Abstract: 

Since the legalization of cannabis in Canada, there has been a steady increase in the number of licences issued by Health Canada. As the cannabis industry is in its infancy and at the start of a larger expansion, there are safety concerns that need to be addressed. Regulatory gaps that could lead to incidents of unsafe operating practices at cannabis growing facilities need to be addressed. This paper attempts to fill these gaps by evaluating policies to mitigating and reduce the risk of unsafe operating practices in Metro Vancouver, either by proactive or reactive measures. It evaluates three policy options intended to create a safer, more comprehensive regulatory system to prevent unsafe operating practices: increased inspections, continuing professional education, and the status quo.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
John Richards
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: School of Public Policy
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.P.P.