Segal Graduate School of Business Final Projects

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Analysis of the Opportunity to Increase the Capacity of the Line Creek Processing Facility

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2015-08
Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Michael Parent
Department: 
Beedie School of Business - Segal Graduate School

Strategic Analysis of an Electricity Deficit in British Columbia

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2015-08
Abstract: 

The British Columbia (BC) Government introduced the Clean Energy Act in 2010. With the new legislation, BC Hydro has been mandated to be electricity self sufficient by 2016. BC Hydro may not have enough generation capacity to meet the regulatory requirement in time. This project explores three potential options for Teck’s Zinc Smelter to provide made-in-BC generation capacity to BC Hydro. After evaluating the options, this author recommends for Teck to make an offer to swap BC Hydro’s imports with Teck’s made-in-BC generation.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
Image
Learning object
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Michael Parent
Department: 
Beedie School of Business - Segal Graduate School

Optimization of Waste Transportation Analysis at Highland Valley Copper

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2015-08
Abstract: 

Mining operations, both in Canada and worldwide, face increasing pressures that affect mine profitability. Declining head grades, increasing strip ratios, deeper excavations and other obstacles intensify mining challenges. In addition, there are societal pressures to increase the sustainability of operations. Teck Resource Limited’s Highland Valley Copper (HVC) mine is not exempt from these challenges and pressures. One challenge of increasing importance at HVC is waste transportation. Exploring opportunities to optimize the transportation of waste at HVC has the potential to bring significant economic and sustainability benefits. Using a hypothetical mine plan, this paper analyzes three options: purchasing more haul trucks, switching to larger, ultra-class haul trucks or installing an In-Pit Crushing and Conveying (IPCC) system. Teck’s Sustainability Focus Areas and economic criteria are used to analyse the options. The analysis concludes that the IPCC system presents many advantages if specific criteria are met to ensure HVC maximizes its investment return.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Leyland Pitt
Department: 
Beedie School of Business - Segal Graduate School

The Effects of Increasing Female Leadership at Teck Resources Limited

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2015-08
Abstract: 

Teck Resources is Canada’s largest diversified mining company with operations in North and South America and exploration projects worldwide. Teck’s overall leadership is currently comprised of 19.2% women; broken down into management (21.8%), senior management (10%) and executive roles (4.5%). Females make up 14.3% of Teck’s Board of Directors. This project evaluates the challenges and opportunities Teck will face in order to increase female leadership. The assessment identified that with a careful, strategic approach to augmenting the pipeline and imparting systems to develop women into leaders, Teck’s female leadership will organically grow. Further, portions of the strategy should be created by the sites as each jurisdiction may have unique challenges. Aligning the vision and communication channels across Teck is essential for successful results.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Leyland Pitt
Department: 
Beedie School of Business - Segal Graduate School

Applied Mineralogy: A Critical Review and 5-Year Plan for Its Strategic Use within Teck

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2015-08
Abstract: 

A strategic business case analysis and five-year plan are presented here for the Teck Applied Mineralogy group in Trail, British Columbia. Applied mineralogy is a key technical competency for Teck Resources that adds value in the fields of process mineralogy supporting optimization at the mining operations, and in ore characterization supporting evaluation of greenfield and brownfield properties. This 2016-2020 business plan for the applied mineralogy group is cognisant of the current mining industry downturn and recommends only incremental increases in staffing and project budgets during the period. Importantly, the plan recommends improved positioning of the group within Teck to maximize its contributions and a focus on customer relationships and timely delivery of value to projects. It also recommends the development of strategic outsourcing partnerships with commercial providers of applied mineralogy, including development of QA/QC protocols, so that this service is well managed within the company as a whole. There are some key capital expenditures necessary for the group in the next five years, including the replacement of mineralogical instrumentation, but their timing can be managed to coincide with improving corporate economics.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Michael Parent
Department: 
B

Open Pit Mining & The Cost of Water Potential Opportunities Towards Sustainable Mining

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2015-08
Abstract: 

Mining operations require vast quantities of water to run ore processing facilities and thus have a responsibility to manage this critical resource. Operations are often located in areas of limited water supply, which may create a competitive\ climate for water consumption. Make-up water for mineral processing can represent a significant portion of production cost for mining companies. While necessary for mining, water in open pits is problematic for extraction activities and leads to increased operational and maintenance costs. This paper analyses the operational and financial impacts of water at three copper mines. Potential options to improve reclaim and pit dewatering volumes are evaluated with the objective to reduce operational costs and water losses. The evaluation of these options integrates Teck’s sustainability strategy and considers water regulations currently changing in Canada and Chile. This paper concludes with the advantages of maximizing open pit dewatering to reduce make-up water requirements, and thus reduce mining production costs.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Elicia Maine
Department: 
Beedie School of Business - Segal Graduate School

Technology and Innovation as Cost Reduction Drivers at Teck

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2015-08
Abstract: 

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the cost control and productivity problems facing the mining industry and Teck Resources in particular, and examine whether technologies, such as automation, and innovations such as integrated operations can contribute to their resolution. The paper identifies the industry that Teck operates in, examines the commodities Teck produces, and identifies some of the problems Teck and the industry faces using a strategic analysis process. For Teck to shift the paradigm of productivity from incremental evolution to a more productive future, major innovation is a better strategy. The Rock Factory concept, where mining becomes a more continuous operation in order to improve productivity, is used as an example of transformational change. To drive transformation across the organization an innovation strategy and appropriate organizational structure with senior management support is required. Change Management strategies are examined that can be used to successfully implement these strategies.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Ian McCarthy
Department: 
Beedie School of Business - Segal Graduate School

Central Dispatch Strategy to Optimize Dispatch at Teck Coal

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2015-08
Abstract: 

Teck Coal utilizes dispatch systems operated by site-based dispatchers tomanage the equipment fleets at its operations. The dispatch function at each operation works independently but Teck Coal strives to standardize processes, operating practices and metrics used across the business unit. This paper identifies the issues with the site-based dispatch model utilized at the operations and examines whether a centralized dispatch model can address these issues and improve Teck Coal’s dispatch function. The research shows that a centralized dispatch model can address the identified issues.

Document type: 
Image
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Leyland Pitt
Department: 
Beedie School of Business - Segal Graduate School

An Improved Implementation Strategy for the Teck Maintenance Program

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2015-08
Abstract: 

Open pit mining is simply about large machinery moving large amounts of material. The optimal operation and maintenance of these machines is critical to business success. In 2010, Teck operations initiated a journey to develop and implement a “World Class” maintenance program across Teck. Five years into the journey, I examine the effectiveness of the implementation of the program on the mining fleets in the coal business unit. I use a series of academic tools to evaluate the successes and shortfalls in achieving the original objectives of the program in the time expected. I then recommend a renewed vision and implementation strategy defined in a focused activity map. The new target value is smaller than the original program but more clearly defined.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Ian McCarthy

Development of Economic Evaluation Methods of Coarse Ore Upgrading Opportunities including Integration of Cut-Off Grade Based Mining Strategies

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2015-08
Abstract: 

Coarse ore upgrading opportunities, involving a mix of new and traditional technologies, are gaining momentum in the mining industry as a tool to improve the economics of resource extraction while lowering the energy and water footprint of the extraction process.Documented attempts to quantify the value of coarse ore upgrading opportunities have focused on the incremental change in processing costs of a static ore stream. In reality, the inclusion of a coarse ore upgrading step will inherently change the key value drivers of the mining operation. For example, with lower processing costs the cut-off grade (lowest grade that can be mined profitably) can be materially reduced, impacting the mine plan and the amount of deposit material classified as ore.This paper provides a framework to integrate cut-of grade based analysis into the evaluation of coarse ore upgrading opportunities from an economic perspective.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Leyland Pitt