Linguistics - Theses, Dissertations, and other Required Graduate Degree Essays

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A study of the segmental phonemes of two Portuguese dialects. --

Date created: 
1970
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Simon Fraser University. Theses (Dept. of Modern Languages)
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

Estudio fonologico del habla de Santander. --

Author: 
Date created: 
1969
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Simon Fraser University. Theses (Dept. of Modern Languages)
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

A phonological study of two linguistic groups in Comerio, Puerto Rico. --

Author: 
Date created: 
1968
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Simon Fraser University. Theses (Dept. of Modern Languages)
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

Conditions on clitic formation. --

Date created: 
1976
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Simon Fraser University. Theses (Dept. of Modern Languages)
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

Stress in the Italian dialect of Bovalino Marina (Calabria). --

Author: 
Date created: 
1971
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Simon Fraser University. Theses (Dept. of Modern Languages)
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

Effects of L1 prosodic background and AV training on learning Mandarin tones by speakers of Cantonese, Japanese, and English

Date created: 
2006
Abstract: 

The present study aims to address the theoretical and methodological issues of tonal acquisition in a second language (L2). The effects of native (L1) prosodic background and audiovisual (AV) training on the perception of the four Mandarin tones by groups of naïve listeners were examined. The experiment employed a pretest-posttest paradigm. Three listener groups of 10 participants each were recruited: Hong Kong Cantonese (a tone language), Japanese (a pitch-accent language), and English (a str ess-accent language). They were randomly assigned to receive one of two training approaches: Simple or AV Feedback. With the Simple Feedback training approach the responses were evaluated as being correct or incorrect. The AV Feedback consisted of sound files, animated pitch graphs, and a brief message that, in addition to indicating whether the response was correct or not, directed listeners’ attention to the crucial perceptual cues of tones. Following training, a posttest and three generalization tests were administered at two different times. Percent correct scores, perceptual sensitivities to each tone (A-prime), and tonal confusions were analyzed. The results indicated substantial differences in the participants’ perception of Mandarin tones after training. With respect to L1 prosodic background, it was found that listeners’ L1 prosodic systems played a significant role in learning Mandarin tones. The Cantonese tonal system hindered the learning of Mandarin tones, whil e the Japanese pitch-accent system facilitated the establishment of a new tonal system. The English stress-accent system neither helped nor hindered tone learning. The performance of the English listeners was intermediate between that of the Cantonese and Japanese listeners. These findings are consistent with the Perceptual Assimilation Model (PAM), suggesting that perceptual mapping is not restricted to segments, but can be extended to suprasegmentals (lexical tones). With respect to the training approach, learners who received AV Feedback required shorter training periods, and they outperformed learners who received Simple Feedback. These findings imply that the AV training approach employed in the current study facilitates the learning of Mandarin tones and promotes the long-term modification of listeners’ tonal properties of L2 tones, thus providing support for its applicability in the training of other tonal languages.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Department of Linguistics - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (Ph.D.)

The influence of second language learning on speech production by Greek/English bilinguals

Date created: 
2007
Abstract: 

This study examined the voice onset time (VOT) of Greek and English voiceless stops (/p/, /t/, /k/) as produced by 20 late Greek/English bilinguals residing in the Greater Vancouver area. VOTs were examined in initially stressed disyllabic words of CVCV structure in five vowels contexts. The participants read 15 stimuli in Greek and English within a carrier phrase and three English sentences that were evaluated for accentedness. Statistical analyses indicated that the bilinguals produced intermediate English VOTs that were longer than those of Greek and shorter than those of English monolinguals. They distinguished stop categories in terms of VOT in the two languages, but not in all environments. Although English and Greek VOTs were correlated, English VOT values for /p/ and /t/ did not differ significantly, while the Greek values did. Accentedness ratings were correlated with age of learning English (0.67), chronological age (0.56) and length of residence in Canada (0.54), but not with English VOTs. These findings of the first study of Greek/English bilinguals indicate that the relationship between L1 and L2 language systems is bidirectional and more complicated than has been portrayed so far.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Department of Linguistics - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)