Linguistics - Theses, Dissertations, and other Required Graduate Degree Essays

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X̲aad Kíl resources for babies

Date created: 
2019-04-16
Abstract: 

What X̠aad Kíl words and phrases do new parents/caregivers need to know to speak to their babies in X̠aad Kíl? I have gathered X̠aad Kíl (the Haida language) materials that have been created or are suitable for babies, toddlers, and small children, and then assembled these materials into a resource. These materials include songs, texts, narratives, phrases, and commands. All the material is in the Alaskan X̠aad Kíl variety (dialect) since there is not already a collection of language suitable for a baby that has been put together in the Alaskan variety of X̠aad Kíl. X̠aad Kíl is in dire need of new language learners. Research has shown the best time to teach a language is in infancy and childhood. I have gathered the appropriate materials important for the successful transmission of X̠aad Kíl to the youngest learners.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
Supervisor(s): 
Marianne Ignace
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Department of Linguistics
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.A.

Working with nettles

Author: 
Date created: 
2019-04-17
Abstract: 

I wrote multiple stories, for this project I chose to focus on one, The Adventures of t̕ət̕emiyeʔ. This story was the largest most complex of all the stories and was translated into Upriver Halq’emeylem by Dr. Siyamiyateliot Elizabeth Phillips. This story is about a young girl named t̕ət̕emiyeʔ ‘Little Wren’ her way of acquiring the knowledge on how to use stinging nettles. Throughout this study I have downriverized, glossed and illustrated accompanying artwork for The Adventures of t̕ət̕emiyeʔ. My resources for doing so were written by Wayne Suttles, Brent Galloway, Franz boas and Nancy Turner. Firstly, I had to familiarize myself with the upriver orthography and what their equivalent representation was in the International Phonetic Alphabet; prior to writing the Hən̓q̓əmín̓əm̓ translation. Secondly, I went through and isolated the obvious translations. Thirdly, I segmented the morphemes of each word, began to gloss what I knew. Lastly, I compiled a list of questions and available resources and began researching the unknowns.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Marianne Ignace
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Department of Linguistics
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.A.

Hul’q’umi’num’ stories as snuw’uyulh: Bringing life lessons to language learners

Author: 
Date created: 
2019-04-15
Abstract: 

The Hul’q’umi’num’ are a Coast Salish people who live on Vancouver Island. This project attempts to inspire my fellow First Nations people to learn the Hul’q’umi’num’ language by learning the sacred cultural teachings (snuw’uyulh) passed from generation to generation. It focuses on teachings from my mother and my grandmothers. My mother taught me that everything is connected and interconnected, everything we do has purpose, and culture and language go hand-in-hand. As is our cultural practice, the teachings are embedded in a set of stories drawn from my personal experiences. The research is framed in the context of language revitalization. My hope is that non-Hul’q’umi’num’ speakers who want to understand the teachings will be inspired to also learn the language.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Donna Gerdts
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Department of Linguistics
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.A.

Hul’q’umi’num’ stories and teachings from Papa Sam

Author: 
Date created: 
2019-04-15
Abstract: 

The goal of this project is to communicate Coast Salish traditional values and life lessons from my childhood through stories in my own language, Hul’q’umi’num’. The topics include early childhood, coming of age, and death. I received the name Sewit as a young child. Coast Salish childhood puts an emphasis on the value and importance of children juxtaposed with the lack of input they are given in cultural practices and important family discussions. The coming of age process transitions you out of childhood and you receive additional responsibilities. You may sit in on the discussions but you are not yet at a place where you can contribute. Death contributes to your transition to the final stage where you are now part of the discussion as the torch is passed from elder to young adult. The other part of the final transition was receiving a chieftainship and the corresponding name, Kweyulutstun.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Donna Gerdts
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Department of Linguistics
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.A.

tetul’ ’u tu syuw’a’numa’: A culturally-based Hul’q’umi’num’ language program

Author: 
Date created: 
2019-04-15
Abstract: 

This project describes the creation of the Hul’q’umi’num’ language curriculum created for the Land and Language Based Learning Program delivered to both Indigenous and non-Indigenous students at Ladysmith Secondary from 2016 to the present. Our program is based on traditional Coast Salish ways of learning our language and culture. Curriculum is based on my own family traditions as well as the wisdom shared by our weavers, knitters, and a master carver. The teachings discussed in this paper include the many gifts of cedar-weaving, drum making, fibre processing—cleaning, teasing, carding, and spinning wool— and weaving. I designed this curriculum so that students can work “as granny did” so that the sense memories of past work could be brought into the present. Our work together has demonstrated the richness of traditional teachings to awaken cultural knowledge and language, the power of nuts’umaat shqwaluwun ‘one heart, one mind.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Donna Gerdts
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Department of Linguistics
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.A.

Wiw’xus! Learning Hul’q’umi’num’ through stories

Author: 
Date created: 
2019-04-15
Abstract: 

I have chosen this project to explore new ways of teaching the Hul’q’umi’num’ language to children in a daycare setting. My project focuses on the book Froggy Goes to Bed by Johnathan London, translated into Hul’q’umi’num’ by Ruby Peter. I develop materials to engage our young learners so that they can learn the vocabulary and phrases needed to understand the story. Recognizing that some children are visual learners while others are auditory learners, I anchor the materials around pictures as well as acting out the meanings. I chose this story because it is full of basic vocabulary—actions and objects—familiar to a child’s world. I break the vocabulary into domains and give a step by step format for graduated learning.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Donna Gerdts
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Department of Linguistics
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.A.

lhalhukw’ siiye’yu: An introduction to birds in the Hul’q’umi’num’ world

Author: 
Date created: 
2019-04-15
Abstract: 

We Hul’q’umi’num’ people have a special connection with the birds in our territory. Because of this, the Hul’q’umi’num’ language teachers in our graduate cohort selected one birds as a special project, working together with photographer Cim MacDonald. Each of us took one of her pictures, researched that bird in the scientific literature and with our Elders, and then worked with our language specialists to lay down a story in Hul’q’umi’num’. Our research resulted in a museum exhibit and a website. I report here about some of the interesting features of birds and the vocabulary you would use to describe them. This will be a resource for teachers and learners of the Hul’q’umi’num’ language and culture.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Donna Gerdts
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Department of Linguistics
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.A.

Building blocks for developing a Hən̓q̓əmín̓əm̓ language nest program for the Katzie Early Years Centre

Date created: 
2019-04-17
Abstract: 

As a First Nations woman and community member of the q̓ícəy̓ (Katzie) First Nation, I have always had an interest in the language of my ancestors – Hən̓q̓əmín̓əm̓, the Downriver dialect of the Halkomelem language, a Coast Salish language that has no first language speakers left. My interest in the language stems from my childhood, as I was lucky enough to have the opportunity to participate in classes that exposed me to the language. The purpose of this project is to not only enhance my own knowledge but to also create framework for what will hopefully be used for a language nest program for the Katzie Early Years Centre. The idea is to provide a safe environment for the children to interact and engage in the language through meaningful activities. This research will ultimately be utilized for the Katzie First Nation head start and preschool programs on Katzie I.R. No. 1.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Marianne Ignace
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Department of Linguistics
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.A.

Encouraging use of conversational Kaska in adult speakers through Kaska language practice sessions

Author: 
Date created: 
2019-04-16
Abstract: 

The Kaska language is a critically endangered Athabaskan language spoken in the southeast Yukon and northeastern B.C. Currently, Kaska is no longer being transmitted to younger people and the fluent speakers are generally over 65 years of age. Kaska people are in a language loss crisis and if steps are not taken to stem this steady language decline, the Kaska language will become extinct. Through a series of adult Kaska beginner conversation practice sessions, this project looks at the language attitudes and current challenges adults wanting to learn Kaska are experiencing. In addition, the sessions were taught in the Pelly Banks dialect to interrogate whether the author, a speaker of a different dialect (Lower Liard/Muncho Lake), could learn across dialects. Recommendations about future activities for adults and for community projects are proposed to increase the use of the Kaska language in all domains and through daily use.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Marianne Ignace
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Department of Linguistics
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.A.

Everyday Halq’eméylem for classroom teachers

Author: 
Date created: 
2019-04-08
Abstract: 

An accumulation of papers, lists, and notes of commonly used phrases in Seabird Island Community School. This document provides information to introduce Upriver Halq’eméylem to a classroom setting.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Marianne Ignace
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Department of Linguistics
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.A.