Linguistics - Theses, Dissertations, and other Required Graduate Degree Essays

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Interspeaker variation in the syntactic processing of referential singular they

Author: 
Date created: 
2019-08-02
Abstract: 

Singular they is suggested to be acceptable in the grammar only when referring to indefinite or gender-neutral antecedents. Previous studies have used antecedents of varying gender expectation to test whether singular they can refer to antecedents with gender, but no experimental studies have considered the social variables that could affect the acceptability of singular they in speech. The goal of this study is to compare the acceptability and processing of singular referential they between cisgender and non-binary individuals, as people who identify as non-binary tend to use they, them, and their as their pronouns of personal reference. This study shows thats there are no effects of gender-expectancy in on-line processing across cisgender and non-binary individuals. I also show that sentences with singular they are overall more natural to non-binary individuals than cisgender individuals, suggesting that social variables affect off-line judgments, but not on-line processing.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Chung-hye Han
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Department of Linguistics
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.

q’ushin’tul’ ’u tunu shxw’a’luqw’a’

Date created: 
2019-08-08
Abstract: 

This project is a personal look into Hul’q’umi’num’ place names and how they provide a linguistic coding of our cultural heritage. I discuss the cultural and personal significance of some of the places in the unceded territory of the Snuneymuxw First Nation. I call on my family history through the oral tradition of my people and draw on my own personal experiences to tell stories in our Hul’q’umi’num’ language of the places I am from, the places I have lived, and the places I have pulled a canoe. It is my hope that this research will help us reach a deeper understanding of place names and the teachings associated with the lands in which we live. I hope to inspire future generations of language learners by handing down the wisdom of our Elders to the younger generation and by showing the connections between our heritage teachings and language.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Donna Gerdts
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Department of Linguistics
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.A.

Me7 Tslxemwílc-kt es Secwepemctsném-kt! Secwépemc language resource development for Little Fawn Nursery – An early years language immersion program

Author: 
Date created: 
2019-04-17
Abstract: 

This is a linguistic study of novice adult language learners when producing speech within an early years immersion program. The study reflects the unique language knowledge of individuals and provides a description of supportive measures for mentoring purposes through the guidance of first language speakers of the Secwepemc language. In a community of limited access to first language speakers, this research study focused on training novice adult language learners about multi-media language learning resources and second-language acquisition teaching strategies to keep young children engaged in activities. The participants used Smart Board technology, hands-on training and the mentor-apprentice model to stay in the language. The study combined experiential ways of learning with innovative technology to mobilize adult speakers at the Little Fawn Nursery language domain within the Tk’emlúps te Secwépemc community.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Marianne Ignace
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Department of Linguistics
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.A.

Hul’q’umi’num’ stories of Tth’asiyetun: The last Coast Salish warrior chief

Author: 
Date created: 
2019-04-15
Abstract: 

This paper is about the life and times of the Coast Salish chief Tth’asiyetun, a hereditary leader of the T’eet’qe’ village, on Valdes Island, British Columbia. Tth’asiyetun was a key figure in the establishment of Fort Langley, center of the northwest fur trade, and he was the lead warrior chief at the historic battle at Maple Bay, a decisive victory over the Yuqwulhte’x raiders from the north. His descendants have since experienced their loss of land, loss of language, loss of history, and loss of dignity. The purpose of my research is to take my family’s oral histories, together with some corroborating research, and create a set of stories in our Hul’q’umi’num’ language that relate the events from a Coast Salish perspective. I offer this work as a homage to my grandmother, who taught me the importance of keeping our language strong, and to the future generations of language learners.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Donna Gerdts
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Department of Linguistics
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.A.

Mulyitul: Hul’q’umi’num’ perspectives on a wedding ceremony

Author: 
Date created: 
2019-04-15
Abstract: 

Public speaking is an important aspect of all Coast Salish ceremonies. It is our way in the Hul’q’umi’num’ territory for ceremonies to be conducted in our own language. While language and protocol at namings, funerals, and memorials has received research attention, weddings are an understudied topic. Weddings are especially complicated because they are a blend of native and modern elements, and they sometimes involve marriage of a community member to someone from outside the community—from a different cultural heritage. It can become a very sophisticated event to observe all the ceremonial elements required by both the bride’s and the groom’s families. This project documents Coast Salish protocols by laying down Hul’q’umi’num’ stories that describe traditional and modern proposals and that also illustrate ceremonial speaking at the wedding itself.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Donna Gerdts
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Department of Linguistics
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.A.

Kinship terms within the Hul’q’umi’num’ territory

Author: 
Date created: 
2019-04-15
Abstract: 

This project discusses kinship terms in Hul’q’umi’num’, a Coast Salish language of British Columbia. The goal of the project is to explain kinship terms in a fashion that is accessible to language learners so that future generations will be aware of the different meanings for vocabulary referring to immediate family, extended family, and in-laws. Information gathered for this project comes from elders within our community. I use stories to help illustrate how to use kinship terms in our Hul’q’umi’num’ language.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Donna Gerdts
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Department of Linguistics
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.A.

“Dámaan St’áang Tl’ang Kínggang-Connecting Our Past, Present and Future to Revitalize Xaad Kíl in Hydaburg, Alaska

Author: 
Date created: 
2019-04-16
Abstract: 

The Xántsii Náay Preschool Immersion Program, opened on September 18, 2018, in Hydaburg, Alaska, working to preserve Xaad Kíl, a critically endangered language of the Northern Alaska Haida people. The main reason this study was conducted through interviews and observation was to find out whether the establishment of the Xántsii Náay Pre-School Immersion Program in September of 2018, in Hydaburg, Alaska, influenced the attitude and values of a community where the language, Xaad Kíl, is nearly extinct and second language learners are introducing pre-school students to the language. The interviews and data themes focused on questions about the past, present and future experiences, of volunteers from three subject groups; a youth focus group, a leadership and a family/caretaker group. There is no research conducted for this particular question. From my attendance at community meetings, and the data themes, from the interviews, the community supports in a positive manner but a reflection of similar situations or recorded voices is unstated anywhere in writing.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Marianne Ignace
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Department of Linguistics
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.A.

Secwepemcésk̓e: Secwépemc personal names and naming

Date created: 
2019-04-17
Abstract: 

This research addresses the subject of Secwepemcésk̓e, Secwépemc personal names and naming, in order to increase knowledge about our traditional names, and help to revitalize the use of Secwepemctsín names as an important domain in the use and knowledge of our language. It is a contribution to the overall revitalization of our endangered language. To recover Secwépemc traditional names that our ancestors from Skítsestn and Tk̓emlúps were given during the 19th and early 20th centuries, I worked with archival records such as Baptisms 1867-1882 and Marriages 1873-1874 from the Kamloops Catholic Diocese; the 1881 Canada Census (Yale Division); the 1877-1878 Joint Reserve Commission Census; and early band lists from the 1920s. In focus group sessions and interviews, I discussed these with a group of Secwepemctsín speaking Elders, mainly from Skítsestn, who provided translations, correct pronunciations, the meaning and context of names, and cultural background information. The information from these sessions, a literature review of previous ethnographic writings and analyses of names by ethnographer James Teit, and research completed by Drs. Marianne and Ronald Ignace all combined to provide a comprehensive examination of Secwépemc names and practices of name-giving. In addition, these works, combined with the focus group sessions with Elders, revealed various categories of Secwepemc names, including ancestral names that derive from spirit-guardian quests (étsxem) but were then passed down to keep the memory of ancestors alive, as well as nick-names that refer to characteristics of a person, and names that directly name the guardian spirit of a person. To enable better understanding of the linguistic structure of Secwepemcésk̓e, I provide a linguistic morpheme gloss of names across these categories, in the hope that this will enable new generations of Secwépemc to engage in naming practices true to the practices and protocols of our ancestors.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Marianne Ignace
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Department of Linguistics
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.A.

Hul’q’umi’num’ hwstey: Stories of appreciation as a paddler

Author: 
Date created: 
2019-04-15
Abstract: 

The way my Hul’q’umi’num’ Elders passed on snuw’uyulh (traditional teachings) to me was through oral narratives. In this project, I share my own passionate stories from twenty-two years of experience as a competitive war canoe paddler. Our coaches help us learn to focus, challenge ourselves, face adversity, and finish what we start. These are the same skills that we seek to pass on to our students in our Hul’q’umi’num’ language courses. By laying down these stories in our Hul’q’umi’num’ language, I hope to support the language learners in their quest to become fluent and also strengthen their hearts and minds.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Donna Gerdts
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Department of Linguistics
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.A.

tsxwi’xwi’em’: Four new Hul’q’umi’num’ stories

Author: 
Date created: 
2019-04-15
Abstract: 

I present four original stories in my First Nations language, Hul’q’umi’num’, a Salish language spoken in southwestern British Columbia, Canada. To assist in the understanding of the stories, I have provided a glossary and interlinear analysis for each. These are true stories relating my experiences growing up in a Coast Salish family in the territory of the Quw’utsun’ people. The first and second stories are about childhood frights and surprises. The third and fourth stories are about mistakes that I made and what I learned from them. By passing these stories on to the next generation, I hope to have opened a doorway to the language for teachers and learners.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Donna Gerdts
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Department of Linguistics
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.A.