Latin American Studies - Theses, Dissertations, and other Required Graduate Degree Essays

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Political propaganda and repression in authoritarian Argentina, 1976-1983

Author: 
Date created: 
1996
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Theses (Dept. of Spanish and Latin American Studies) - / Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

Rural women, Mexico's 'comparative advantage'? : lived experiences of economic restructuring in two Puebla ejidos

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1996
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Theses (Dept. of Spanish and Latin American Studies) - / Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

Transforming reality : women and human rights in Nicaragua

Author: 
Date created: 
1996
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Theses (Dept. of Spanish and Latin American Studies) - / Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

"Social cleansing" in Colombia

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1996
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Theses (Dept. of Spanish and Latin American Studies) - / Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

Awaking to the dream: Education, leadership, and political-cultural formation in four Neo-Zapatista communities of Chiapas

Date created: 
2006
Abstract: 

The Zapatista National Liberation Army (EZLN), which surfaced on January 1'' 1994, has generated a great deal of interest among social scientists, as expressed in the publication of several books and articles that analyze the uprising. Education, however, is one aspect of the neo-Zapatista movement that social scientist have not explored in those publications. After the uprising, the EZLN along with its base communities undertook the development of an education system autonomously from the Mexican state. The goal of this thesis, therefore, is to understand the role of that education system on the politicalcultural formation of the neo-Zapatista movement. Based on field research conducted in four neo-Zapatista communities and on the analysis of the relationship between regional culture, education, and leadership, this thesis concludes that one of the roles of the education system is the development, maintenance, and reproduction of a democratic leadership within the neo-Zapatista movement.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Latin American Development Studies - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

The impact of government intervention in the industry: A case study of the electronics industry in Jalisco, Mexico

Author: 
Date created: 
2012-09-05
Abstract: 

This paper examines the processes of interaction and cooperation in the electronics industry in Jalisco as well as the impact of government strategies on the industry’s development of innovative activities. This paper relies upon the sectoral systems of innovation (SSI) as a theoretical framework for the analysis of the nature, structure, organization, and dynamic of the electronics sector of the metropolitan region of Guadalajara. The paper concludes that the interaction among public-private actors has been an important factor in fostering upgrades in the industry. It also highlights the role of the government at the state level in Jalisco as a key factor in facilitating the self-organization of a sector by creating bridge institutions that shape the interaction in the sector. Finally, the paper points out the limited integration in the scientific-educational sector and the necessity to incorporate domestic firms into the value chain of the industry.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Anil Hira
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Latin American Development Studies
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.

Patriarchy, culture and land: challenges in securing women's ownership and titling rights in La Paz, Bolivia

Author: 
Date created: 
2012-04-10
Abstract: 

Studies recognize that formal land ownership for poor rural women in developing countries may provide socio-economic benefits that may significantly improve women’s lives. Despite the high involvement of women in rural activities, in many developing countries women experience land tenure insecurity. Bolivia has some of the most advanced gender-sensitive land laws in Latin America, which explicitly recognize the goal of gender equality in land ownership and titling programs. Yet, full implementation and wide recognition of these laws remain a challenge in practice. Using a qualitative approach based on field research in the department of La Paz, Bolivia, this thesis examines how socio-cultural practices and norms combined with institutional obstacles, may hinder Bolivian rural women’s ability to ensure their land rights are respected, recognized, and secured. The success of ensuring gender equality in land policies and titling programs must involve an analysis and consideration of the local socio-cultural frameworks that may be gender discriminatory.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
John Brohman
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Latin American Development Studies
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.

Forced government change: a comparative study of the historical and social forces involved in the 1953 Iranian and 2002 Venezuelan coups d’état

Author: 
Date created: 
2011-11-29
Abstract: 

Two geopolitically important and petroleum-rich countries are Iran and Venezuela. The modern history of these two countries has been greatly influenced by the fact that both countries lie on top of large petroleum reserves. Each country experienced political coups d’état that were directly linked to their petroleum policies and economic dependence on their petroleum reserves. The coup in Iran occurred on the 19th of August, 1953, leading to the removal of Dr. Mohammed Mossadegh from office. The Venezuelan coup occurred on the 12th of April 2002, but failed to permanently remove Hugo Chavez from office. Organized resistance played an essential role in the results of these two coups. Using Gramscian concepts the resistance to the Iranian coup d’état of 1953 and the Venezuelan coup attempt of 2002 were analyzed. In the national-popular forces in Iran 1953 failed to keep Mossadegh in office in Iran, while the Venezuelan popular-democratic movement helped Hugo Chavez to remain in office in 2002. Four main variables emerge that explain the differing outcomes of the coups in terms of the resistance. The first is the relative efficacy of international versus domestic forces in determining the outcomes of coups d’état. The second and third variables are the class composition and strategy of the popular forces. The fourth variable relates to the technological context in which the two coups occurred. By studying the interaction of these variables, conclusions can be made regarding how best to combat coup attempts.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Gerardo Otero
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Latin American Development Studies
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.

Performing, vending, and walking in the city: the internally displaced population's occupation of spaces in Medellin, Colombia

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011-05-20
Abstract: 

Internally displaced persons (IDPs) in Medellin, Colombia experience stigmatization and social, economic, and spatial exclusion. Furthermore, despite the fact that they generally remain in the city on a permanent basis, IDPs are treated as temporary or ambiguous residents. This thesis examines how IDPs respond to these experiences by permanently occupying and appropriating spaces in Medellin using social, cultural, and economic activities. Drawing primarily on evidence from two cases - the Centro de Desarrollo Cultural de Moravia and Parque Berrío - and exploring the concepts of the right to the city, spatial practice, and the transformation of space, this thesis demonstrates how performing, vending, and walking are among the activities that IDPs undertake to occupy spaces and establish their permanence in Medellin.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Alexander Dawson
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Latin American Development Studies
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.

From food security to food sovereignty: The Fome Zero Food Acquisition Program in the Pontal do Paranapanema, Brazil

Author: 
Date created: 
2011-05-04
Abstract: 

This thesis explores the role of Brazil’s Food Acquisition Program (Programa de Aquisição de Alimentos or the PAA) in facilitating food security and food sovereignty. It specifically explores how this government program sources local food from smallholder farmers on agrarian reform settlements in the Pontal do Paranapanema region of São Paulo state to feed local food vulnerable populations. This thesis explores the incentives and challenges associated with such a project for both the farmers and the government and how the program incorporates pillars of food sovereignty. This thesis will also explore the significance of a transition from a neoliberal globalized food regime towards a localized food-sovereignty regime in the region's rural communities.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Dr. Hannah Wittman
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Latin American Development Studies
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.