Biomedical Physiology and Kinesiology - Theses, Dissertations, and other Required Graduate Degree Essays

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A study of the feasibility of using nerve cuff signals as feedback for maintenance of posture in paraplegic subjects

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2004
Abstract: 

Standing in paraplegics can be restored using Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) to activate paralyzed muscles below the spinal cord lesion. However, reliable balance control with FES will also require sensory feedback. Suitability of electroneurographic (ENG) signals from nerve cuff electrodes as feedback for controlling FES was studied in awake swine during postural sway. Tibial nerve ENG signals were recorded using implanted amplifiers, and pressure distribution under both hind feet was simultaneously monitored. Comparisons were made between pressure changes under the feet of swine and human subjects. During human sway in eight directions, average pressure in loaded foot-sole regions increased by 72+24%. In swine subjects, comparable pressure changes were detected from the ENG signals with 94% accuracy, and 84% of all swine postural sway events were detectable from ENG signals. Results from this study suggest that closed-loop control of paraplegic posture using nerve signals to monitor center-ofpressure displacements may be feasible.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Andy Hoffer
Department: 
Science: Department of Biomedical Physiology and Kinesiology
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.Sc.

Mechanisms of adaptive motor control

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2004
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Theodore Milner
Department: 
Science: Department of Biomedical Physiology and Kinesiology
Thesis type: 
(Dissertation) Ph.D.

"Creative dance" : potentiality for enhancing psychomotor, cognitive, and social-affective functioning in seniors and young children

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1997
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
John Dickinson
Department: 
Science: Biomedical Physiology and Kinesiology
Thesis type: 
Thesis (Ph.D.)

The rewarming effects of radiant heat on the blush area in postoperative cardiac surgical patients

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1997
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Tom Calvert
Department: 
Science: Biomedical Physiology and Kinesiology
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.Sc.)

The effects of exercise training on myocyte pHi regulation

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1996
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
G. Tibbits
Department: 
Science: Biomedical Physiology and Kinesiology
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.Sc.)

An investigation of the specificity of motor learning hypothesis

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1996
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Ron Marteniuk
Department: 
Science: Biomedical Physiology and Kinesiology
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.Sc.)

A task analysis of laparoscopic surgery : requirements for remote manipulation and endoscopic tool design

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1996
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Christine MacKenzie
Department: 
Science: Biomedical Physiology and Kinesiology
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.Sc.)

Mechanisms of oxygen reduction by hydroquinones

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1994
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
A.J. Davison
Department: 
Science: Biomedical Physiology and Kinesiology
Thesis type: 
Thesis (Ph.D.)

Motor unit characteristics of flexor carpi radialis muscle in man

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1984
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
P. Bawa
Department: 
Science: Biomedical Physiology and Kinesiology
Thesis type: 
Thesis (Ph.D.)

The effects of instructions on motoneuron excitability and the gain of reflexes

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1984
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
P. Bawa
Department: 
Science: Biomedical Physiology and Kinesiology
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.Sc.)