International Studies - Theses, Dissertations, and other Required Graduate Degree Essays

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Multilingualism and language practice of minority language background youths: a case study of the ethnic Korean youths in China

Date created: 
2008
Abstract: 

This dissertation explores the interrelation of language, identity, and multilingualism among language minority youths through sociolinguistic and ethnographic lenses. Drawing from the data collected in a case study of six multilingual ethnic Korean teenagers from the ChaoXianZu Diaspora in Beijing, China, this study illustrates the interplay of the macro-level conditions and micro-level processes through which these youths negotiate their identities in multilingual contexts. Followed by a debate of the nature of contemporary Chinese nationalism, the study also examines the relationship between nationalism, multilingualism, language, and identities among minority groups in general. The findings suggest that multilingual speakers tend to devalue their own language knowledge, and consequently undermine their own legitimacy as multilingual. In turn, it is suggested that the schools and educators must pay attention to this tendency, which will affect the self esteem and vigorous intellectual development of the minority language background students in this multilingual era.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
M
Department: 
School for International Studies - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

The blogosphere in China: how blogs reflect and act as a catalyst for change

Author: 
Date created: 
2008
Abstract: 

The present Chinese government maintains a monopoly on information distribution in order to control the flow of information to the populace. With the growing urban population and advent of electronic communications technologies, communications between citizens without the interference of government control is facilitated. Although the central government still seems to keep a firm hand on dissent, with the growing popularity of blogs, and other forms of electronic communications, information can now spread very quickly. People can now access both commentary and opinion, allowing them to know what their countrymen are thinking, and to domestic and international news. The promulgation of blogs within China will; enable more discussion of both societal issues and significant events by Chinese people within China; facilitate societal and political progress, and perhaps spur governmental change; allow outsiders to engage and understand what the Chinese themselves are saying.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
M
Department: 
School for International Studies - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Project (M.A.)

Protecting women: an examination of the deficiencies in the Protection of Women Act and other qualitative barriers

Author: 
Date created: 
2008
Abstract: 

President Musharraf enacted the Protection of Women Act, which came into effect for all of Pakistan on December 1, 2006. Its purpose is to protect women from violence and from the misuse of the Hudood Ordinances. However, there is no evidence, which suggests that the Act has been accepted or implemented across the country. Therefore, this paper identifies the qualitative barriers against the Act. Specifically, this paper examines the debates and protests surrounding the passage of the Act to discern broader conflicts that serve as barriers (e.g. the conflict over the basis of moral right). The text of the Act is also examined to identify deficiencies that prevent it from being effective. Ultimately, the analysis confirms the presence of qualitative barriers, such as the struggle over cultural change. Moreover, it indicates that the Act itself contains many deficiencies and cannot protect women as it is currently formulated.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
T
Department: 
School for International Studies - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Project (M.A.)

The role of community participation in the prevention of dengue: a case study from Cuba

Date created: 
2007
Abstract: 

More than 2.5 billion people in the world remain potentially exposed to acquire dengue fever in their lifetimes. Climate change, uncontrolled urbanization, poverty and environmental degradation have contributed to the increase of the Aedes aegypti population, the main vector that carries the disease. Traditional eradication programs that focused on mosquito larval control with the use of chemicals failed to eliminate the disease. Evidence shows that the involvement of the community in reducing the breeding sites of Aedes aegypti and collaboration among various sectors of the community are the most effective methods to prevent dengue. This paper explores the role of community participation in the prevention of dengue fever and the control of its main vector. Using a community-based intersectoral program in a district of Havana, Cuba, this study analyzes the efficiency of such a participatory approach and its capacity to be a sustainable solution for dengue prevention.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
International Leadership Special Arrangements Cohort - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Project (M.A.)

Social enterprise professionals: background, capacity building and concepts of entrepreneurship

Date created: 
2007
Abstract: 

Social enterprise has emerged in response to funding changes in the social services sector. The field represents an innovative approach to service delivery in Canada and internationally. The purpose of this research paper is to examine the capacity and management styles of people in leadership roles in employment-based social enterprises across Canada. Within the field of social enterprise, practitioners operate with both business and social skills, two skill sets that are rarely combined educationally and professionally. Through interviews, this research compares the background, skills and characteristics of social enterprise leaders with concepts of entrepreneurship drawn from the literature. The paper generates a greater understanding of the learning and culture shifts that occurred for individuals pursuing a career in social enterprise. Findings will be useful for informing educational and training programs for social enterprise development and for social enterprise professionals in determining and meeting their own learning needs.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
International Leadership Special Arrangements Cohort - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Project (M.A.)

Women and Food Sovereignty: gendered perspectives from Chaupiuno, Bolivia

Date created: 
2012-12-17
Abstract: 

Food sovereignty questions the current economic and social power structures which shape the global food production and distribution system, and advocates for control at the local or domestic level. A key determining factor for the successful implementation of food sovereignty is increased gender equality. However a considerable amount of uncertainty exists in respect to this relationship – uncertainty regarding how to execute the gender empowerment process and uncertainty as to how gender empowerment will manifest for a more food sovereign future. This thesis project explores the relationship between food sovereignty and women’s empowerment through the experiences of seven women who have engaged in a goat cheese commercialization project in Chaupiuno, Bolivia.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Onur Bakiner
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: School for International Studies
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.A.

Appropriating the past: A comparative study of official memory practices in Rwanda and Burundi

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2012-08-16
Abstract: 

In the aftermath of mass violence, the political and social nature of memory becomes even more apparent. The way in which past abuses are remembered and represented significantly influences the ability of individuals and communities to reconstruct social relations. The cases of post-genocide Rwanda and Burundi reveal strongly the relationship between memory, identity and power in the aftermath of mass atrocity. Although contemporary Rwanda and Burundi are often contrasted due to their diverging approaches to ethnicity, this paper argues that the memory of past conflict and ethnic tension has been appropriated by elites in both nations, resulting in the subjugation of alternate narratives of the past. It further asserts that the restriction of political space for dialogue on the past prevents a collective appreciation of the inherent complexities of genocide and mass violence in both nations. The failure of dominant groups in both cases to allow for a critical engagement of the past is concerning, as divisive identities and overt conflict risk being reproduced rather than deconstructed.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Onur Bakiner
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: School for International Studies
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.A.

Microfinance for microenterprises? Investigating the usefulness of microfinance services for microenterprises in Bolivia

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2012-08-13
Abstract: 

Despite uncertainty about whether or not microenterprises (MEs) contribute to economic growth, it is believed that MEs contribute to human development. This research paper investigates how microfinance helps microenterprise owners in Bolivia achieve certain aspects of human development. Credit services are shown to be particularly helpful for microenterprise owners in this regard; however fieldwork constraints made it impossible to determine the role of savings services. This study enhances the discussion on microfinance for microenterprises because it considers MEs from a human development perspective instead of the typical income-poverty reduction view. Moreover, it highlights the voice of microfinance program staff and participants by following participatory program evaluation methods.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
John Harriss
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: School for International Studies
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.A.

NGO Politics in Uganda: A Practitioner's Perspective

Date created: 
2012-12-17
Abstract: 

In the 1990s and early 2000s, the government of Uganda provided an enabling environment for Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) to engage in development and advocacy work. Since the introduction of multiparty elections in 2006 however, President Museveni has begun to adhere to a new set of norms that mark a relapse in his government’s commitment to human and civil rights. In response, heightened tensions have emerged between the government of Uganda and civil society and as a result legislation has been introduced to restrict NGO activity in the country. This paper argues that these tensions are a product of both Uganda’s fractionalized political system and the strategic priorities of donors and NGOs operating in the country. Therefore in order to be more effective, NGOs must engage with larger sections of the population and be cognizant of the risks associated with their advocacy work.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Morten Jerven
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: School for International Studies
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.A.

M-PESA:Why Kenya?

Date created: 
2012-12-17
Abstract: 

This research paper examines the factors that contributed to the remarkable adoption of M-PESA, a mobile payments system, in Kenya. In particular, it investigates the differences in the uptake of mobile money in Kenya and Tanzania by comparing the initial country conditions, sociocultural norms and business strategies employed in the implementation process. It finds that, despite many similarities between the two countries, Kenya has experienced a remarkably higher degree of uptake compared to Tanzania. The paper attributes the higher adoption rate in Kenya to a combination of favorable country conditions, supportive social-cultural context and effective implementation strategies employed by the service provider Safaricom. It concludes that the rapid adoption of M-PESA is an exception and not the rule for mobile money adoption models, and recommends that service providers tailor their implementation strategies to the unique conditions in each country.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Morten Jerven
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: School for International Studies
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.A.