International Studies - Theses, Dissertations, and other Required Graduate Degree Essays

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Where credit's due: livelihoods, market failure and financial sector development for poverty reduction in rural Mozambique

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2009
Abstract: 

Mozambique is widely cited as one of the few recent examples of rapid and sustained economic growth in sub-Saharan Africa. Noting that this growth has contributed to appreciable poverty reduction, this paper argues that Mozambique’s economic miracle has yet to generate economic opportunities commensurate with the livelihood needs of the rural population in particular. The paper begins with an analysis of the development of livelihood strategies amongst rural Mozambican households throughout the country’s modern history. The analysis then shifts focus to the country’s post conflict economy expansion and the emergence of non-agricultural crop production economic opportunities for rural Mozambicans. The lack of such opportunities is seen, in larger part, to result from a poor environment for entrepreneurial activity, limited most notably by the failure of the commercial financial sector to serve adequately the needs of rural Mozambicans. Finally, a number of financial sector institutional alternatives are explored.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
A
Department: 
School for International Studies - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Project (M.A.)

The functional use of religious identity for the production of ethnic riots: an analysis of sources

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2009
Abstract: 

This paper inspects the relationship between Hindu communal discourse and Hindu-Muslim riots. It examines how conflict entrepreneurs employ religious discourse, utilize religious networks, and attack religious symbols in order to condition an ambivalent acceptance of anti-Muslim violence among non-elite Hindu communities. Localities exhibiting endemic outbursts of Hindu-Muslim riots are, most often, pre-planned productions meant to create and reinforce new stigmatisations of Muslims among the majority Hindu population. Designed to generate a collective Hindu anxiety, these riots offer the ability to impose the belief that Hindus are under siege by their Muslim neighbours. Thus, Hindu-Muslim riots are opportunities desired by conflict entrepreneurs to maintain their influence in particular localities. This paper also provides an analysis of the various propositions put forth to explain why communal violence occurs in order to clarify misnomers, which, effectually, have obscured the linkages between ethnic violence, identity construction, and Hindu communal discourse.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
A
Department: 
School for International Studies - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Project (M.A.)

Factors that contributed to the economic success of Botswana

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2009
Abstract: 

At independence in 1966, Botswana was one of the poorest countries in the world, dependent on foreign assistance and poor grade cattle for economic growth. However, following the discovery of diamonds in 1967 the country has radically changed. The purpose of this paper is to explain some of the reasons why beyond simply the discovery of diamonds, Botswana was economically successful following 1966. The first reason Botswana’s economy was successful is because of their specific history and location. The second factor to be explored is leadership, specifically the role that Seretse Khama played in encouraging the economic success of Botswana. Luck and institutions were also very important in Botswana’s economic success. As a resource rich economy, Botswana is at risk to contract the ‘Dutch disease’, but for the most part through prudent policy they have been able to achieve macro-economic stability.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
A
Department: 
School for International Studies - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Project (M.A.)

Inequality and unconsolidated democracies in Latin America: the role of flawed judicial institutions

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2009
Abstract: 

Latin American democracies are characterized by three traits – illiberalism, inequality, and weak judicial institutions – which are connected to each other through a complex system of mechanisms. Flawed judiciaries diminish both the capacity of the state to guarantee constitutional rights and the ability of democracy to empower marginalized citizens. These trends contribute to systemic bias and discrimination, the criminalization of the poor, and the private administration of justice. Reforming judicial institutions to increase the strength of the judicial branch and enhance horizontal accountability has the potential to dismantle structural inequality in Latin America and contribute to the deepening and consolidation of these democratic regimes.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
E
Department: 
School for International Studies - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Project (M.A.)

Industrial relations in China: the evolving nature of labour law reform

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2009
Abstract: 

The “Industrial Relations in China: the Evolving Nature of Labour Law Reform” project will permit a greater understanding of the governance of labour reform as China continues its rapid market integration. Indeed, it is now the case that in China, the concept of governance is increasingly diffusing among alternative stakeholders, such as international corporations. This project will demonstrate that labour reform is moving away from traditional state-centric frameworks, and toward the private sector delivery of labour reform compliance. By examining the concept of governance in China through the lens of labour reform, the emerging issues related to China’s integration into the world economy are clearer. This project outlines the strengths and weaknesses of both domestic and international labour reform frameworks, and allows the reader to understand the primary drivers of labour reform, especially in the labour-intensive export-oriented development zones of South China.

Document type: 
Thesis
Senior supervisor: 
S
Department: 
School for International Studies - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Project (M.A.)

Project Jugamos "Let's Play": designing and implementing sport for development programs in impoverished rural regions

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2009
Abstract: 

Play represents not only an enjoyable past time, but is also a way to foster peace and development. Through play, children learn valuable life lessons, such as the importance of cooperation, teamwork, and leadership. At the same time, participation in play has been shown to improve overall mental and physical health. While many international organizations are utilizing the benefits of sport and play, the tools to conduct sport for development programs have not been made readily available to communities most in need. This project details the actual experience of creating and establishing a sport for development program in the municipality of Copán, Honduras, in order to improve the overall health of the community. By working in collaboration with community members, and local organizations in Honduras, Jugamos “Let’s Play” established a program that currently provides over 450 children workshops in health, nutrition and hygiene, as well as the opportunity to play.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
K
Department: 
School for International Studies - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Project (M.A.)

State builders, nation destroyers? Clans and national cohesion in Central Asia

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2009
Abstract: 

Contrary to prevailing theories on clans, high levels of national identification, as reported in an AsiaBarometer survey conducted in 2005, indicate that citizens of Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan possess a greater proclivity to a civic identity than to any other form of subnational identification. This essay examines the relationship between state and society, in order to understand how high levels of national identification can exist in a political and social arena trapped within the traditionalism of clan politics. Although clans remain a source of identification in Central Asia, it does not take precedence over a civic identity among the citizens, as it does among the political elite. The conflicts which have occurred in Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan are indicative of the rift between a state engaged in clan-based practices and a society eager to transition into a political and social arena based on the tenets of modern, democratic statehood.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
N
Department: 
School for International Studies - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Project (M.A.)

Factors influencing a basin-wide agreement governing the Nile river

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2009
Abstract: 

This study analyzes the challenges facing the Nile River Basin riparian countries in terms of how best to achieve collaborative solutions within a transboundary river basin. Lessons learned from other transboundary river basins are incorporated into an analysis of factors promoting and impeding cooperation. Collective action theory is applied to determine the prospects for a basin-wide agreement in the Nile. While the results of this imply that the prospects for such an agreement are low, further analysis demonstrates that this theory does not adequately capture the complexity of issues and diversity of stakeholders within the Nile River Basin. The results of this study will help to inform River Basin Organizations (RBOs) and policy makers of external drivers impacting cooperating, as well as opportunities to emphasize benefit sharing and a sense of community and common identify amongst basin stakeholders as mechanisms for cooperative river basin management.

Document type: 
Thesis
Senior supervisor: 
J
Department: 
School for International Studies - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Project (M.A.)

Christian mission in India: contributions of some missions to social change

Date created: 
2008
Abstract: 

The thesis follows the development of selected Christian missions in India as a form of NGO activity. The thesis examines the development of this form of NGO activity seeking to find factors that have made for success in areas of Christian expansion but also the resultant social and economic development spheres. It then discusses the value of these contributions to the wider area of NGO development activity. Christian NGO activity is based on an altruistic motivation. In itself this motivation has not been sufficient to yield success. Success has come from ministering to people who are in crisis exhibiting distinct areas of need. To meet this need a holistic model as opposed to a narrow evangelistic model must be adopted even if it requires some revision to the original theological or ideological outlook. A sound development model suited to the needs of these people has to be adopted. This is seen to be one with roots in the thinking of the Reformation period by Luther and Calvin. Max Weber the German sociologist also noted this linkage giving it the title The Protestant Work Ethic seeing it as one of the foundations of the modern world and the economic progress that has been enjoined. This Reformation based model was first proved in the early mission activity amongst Dalit people in Tamil Nadu. The modern equivalent has been developed by the Aroles in Maharastra and widely adopted by the present NGO network. Further there is the need to develop sound organizational and institutional methods to ensure continuity. These same basic principles are shown to be effective when secularized and utilized by other religious and non religious NGOs with similar desirable effects.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
M
Department: 
School for International Studies - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Dissertation (Ph.D.)

Dimensions and problems of displaced populations in peace building

Author: 
Date created: 
2008
Abstract: 

World history has witnessed the creation of a large number of internally displaced persons (IDPs) and refugees as a result of most of major conflicts in the different regions. The issues relating to both internal and external displacements have proved to be a major deterrent for sustaining peace in many of the countries and continents. Apart from the humanitarian aspects involved in resettling the IDPs and refugees, the displaced population has been the cause of many crimes and for exacerbation of further conflicts. Therefore, it has been recognized that solutions to displacement also play important parts in peace building. In all, security of the displaced populations, property issues, reintegration of the displaced groups into society, and conflict between international intervention and national sovereignty are particularly important.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
L
Department: 
School for International Studies - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Project (M.A.)