International Studies - Theses, Dissertations, and other Required Graduate Degree Essays

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Chinese immigrants attitudes toward HIV and HIV prevention interventions in metro Vancouver: Is there a disconnect?

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2007
Abstract: 

Chinese immigrants are populating Metro Vancouver in large numbers; they bring with them values, beliefs and attitudes developed in China. Attitudes towards HIV are steeped in beliefs about taboo topics, at risk groups of people and the concept of face. Canadian school-based HIV prevention interventions do not consider cultural beliefs and are not relevant to most Chinese immigrants. Secondary research was undertaken to develop an understanding of Chinese attitudes toward HIV, Canadian HIV prevention interventions and the attitudes of Chinese immigrants living in “western” countries. Reviewing Chinese attitudes towards HIV and Canadian HIV prevention interventions illustrated a disconnect between the interventions and the intended audience: Chinese immigrants. Interventions informed by additional research and the involvement of Chinese immigrant families are needed to reach out to Chinese immigrants.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Stephen Easton
Department: 
Arts and Social Sciences: School for International Studies
Thesis type: 
(Research project) M.A.

The rising tide of corporate social responsibility in China

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2007
Abstract: 

Proponents of ‘corporate social responsibility’ or ‘CSR’ believe that corporations should be responsible to the societies and environments in which they operate. CSR is a familiar concept in the developed markets of North America and Europe; increasingly, companies are also being held accountable for their social and environmental impacts in developing countries. This trend is being observed in China, where CSR appears to be gaining considerable ground. This paper examines the drivers and challenges to the adoption of CSR in China, and argues that the rising tide of corporate social responsibility will continue to grow, both from internal and external pressures, as China becomes an increasingly important and influential participant in the global economy.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Stephen Easton
Department: 
Arts and Social Sciences: School for International Studies
Thesis type: 
(Research project) M.A.