International Studies - Theses, Dissertations, and other Required Graduate Degree Essays

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Recruitment and DDR: The case of Liberia

Date created: 
2010-08-12
Abstract: 

This paper argues that if Disarmament, Demobilisation, and Reintegration (DDR) programmes have evolved from conflict resolution mechanisms to conflict prevention mechanisms, then there must be a greater focus on the nature of the recruitment relationship between the faction and the individual. Based on the theoretical and empirical work of Pugel, Humphreys, and Weinstein, the project uses the case of Liberia and its ex-combatants to support the theory that factions with different social and economic endowments will recruit individuals seeking out those endowments. It concludes that in the case of Liberia and other DDR programmes, there has been an overemphasis on short-term employment solutions for ex-combatants, that DDR should provide more methods to include those ex-combatants who wish to participate in the rebuilding and reconciliation process, and that continued emphasis on the context of the individual is essential.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Jeff Checkel
John Harriss
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: School for International Studies
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.A.

The use of cultural heritage in economic and human development: a comparison of built heritage projects in Morocco and British Columbia

Date created: 
2011-08-24
Abstract: 

Recent decades have found those in the development field seeking alternatives to resource-extraction based approaches to development. The use of Cultural Heritage, and specifically built heritage projects, has become one such approach that offers more sustainable and culturally-sensitive alternatives. A few Cultural Heritage projects have been ongoing for decades now, and offer insights into how these sorts of initiatives can be approached, and what can be learned from them and applied to similar situations in other parts of the world. The old medina of Fez in Morocco is one such well-established project that offers an example of some of the potential, as well as some of the pitfalls, of this endeavour. This project seeks to evaluate these lessons in the light of a few newer Cultural Heritage projects that have been established by First Nations groups in British Columbia, and by comparing them to the medina of Fez. The potential of this approach to development is evaluated in the light of the successes and challenges that these projects face.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Paul Warwick
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: School for International Studies
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.A.

Challenges to moderation theory: Muqtada al-Sadr and Iraq’s Sadrist movement

Date created: 
2011-08-23
Abstract: 

Nearly all scholarship on radical political movements suggests that participation in formal politics will lead to moderation. Yet Iraq’s Sadrist Movement, the Shi’a Islamist group headed by Muqtada al-Sadr, defies the widespread assumption that political inclusion leads to moderation. This thesis will examine the Sadrist Movement to explore when political participation produces ideological moderation and when it does not. In late 2004, the Sadrist Movement recognized the legitimacy of the Iraqi state, ceased using violence and entered electoral politics. The literature suggests that the Sadrist movement should have continued to moderate in response to further political and material incentives. However, in 2006 the Sadrists returned to violence and grew increasingly hostile toward democratic politics. Why did the Sadrist Movement reverse course in this manner? This work argues that unstable environments, such as that of post-2003 Iraq, can cause parties to behave in ways that defy the assumptions of moderation theory.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Tamir Moustafa
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: School for International Studies
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.A.

Barriers to Iranian-Canadian community engagement and capacity building

Author: 
Date created: 
2011-08-19
Abstract: 

This thesis examines the barriers Iranians face, after immigrating to Canada, to integrate and engage in the Canadian society, focusing on the Iranian community in Vancouver. The roots of these barriers at times go back to the country’s history and culture, and the way they shaped the people’s identity and at times to the host country’s immigration policies and social, political and cultural environment. These barriers affect the diaspora on both individual and collective levels and prevent them from realizing their potential as a highly educated community that could contribute to the host country. Identifying, acknowledging and addressing these issues are the first step, toward building a more cohesive and functional Iranian community. This study tries to provide a building block for future projects.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Michael Howard
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: School for International Studies
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.A.

Impression management in the workplace: A key to immigrant integration in the labour market

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2007
Abstract: 

Research suggests that immigrants’ inability to obtain mainstream jobs and lack of economic mobility in the labour market is attributed to the lack of human and social capital. In additional, they face institutional barriers such as the devaluation of foreign credentials and discrimination. In this paper, I address the implication of impression management techniques for immigrant integration in the labour market. This paper offers insight on how immigrants can minimize misguided perceptions and overcome invisible barriers through the use of two impression management techniques: dress and business etiquette.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Michael Howard
Department: 
Arts and Social Sciences: School for International Studies
Thesis type: 
(Research project) M.A.

Chinese immigrants attitudes toward HIV and HIV prevention interventions in metro Vancouver: Is there a disconnect?

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2007
Abstract: 

Chinese immigrants are populating Metro Vancouver in large numbers; they bring with them values, beliefs and attitudes developed in China. Attitudes towards HIV are steeped in beliefs about taboo topics, at risk groups of people and the concept of face. Canadian school-based HIV prevention interventions do not consider cultural beliefs and are not relevant to most Chinese immigrants. Secondary research was undertaken to develop an understanding of Chinese attitudes toward HIV, Canadian HIV prevention interventions and the attitudes of Chinese immigrants living in “western” countries. Reviewing Chinese attitudes towards HIV and Canadian HIV prevention interventions illustrated a disconnect between the interventions and the intended audience: Chinese immigrants. Interventions informed by additional research and the involvement of Chinese immigrant families are needed to reach out to Chinese immigrants.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Stephen Easton
Department: 
Arts and Social Sciences: School for International Studies
Thesis type: 
(Research project) M.A.

The rising tide of corporate social responsibility in China

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2007
Abstract: 

Proponents of ‘corporate social responsibility’ or ‘CSR’ believe that corporations should be responsible to the societies and environments in which they operate. CSR is a familiar concept in the developed markets of North America and Europe; increasingly, companies are also being held accountable for their social and environmental impacts in developing countries. This trend is being observed in China, where CSR appears to be gaining considerable ground. This paper examines the drivers and challenges to the adoption of CSR in China, and argues that the rising tide of corporate social responsibility will continue to grow, both from internal and external pressures, as China becomes an increasingly important and influential participant in the global economy.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Stephen Easton
Department: 
Arts and Social Sciences: School for International Studies
Thesis type: 
(Research project) M.A.