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Mengkanunkan Agama: Islam, Hak-hak Liberal, dan Kenegaraan Malaysia

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2020-10-01
Abstract: 

Kebanyakan negara majori Muslim memiliki sistem perundangan yang meliputi peruntukan Islam dan hak-hak liberal. Meskipun kedua-dua elemen tersebut tidak semestinya bercanggahan, komitmen terhadap kedua-duanya menjadi asas, dari segi undang-undang serta simbolik, untuk para aktivis mengajukan visi masing-masing tentang negara dan masyarakat. Dengan menggunakan Malaysia sebagai kajian kes, buku Mengkanunkan Agama ini meneliti bagaimana susun atur perundangan sedemikian telah mencetuskan litigasi-litigasi dan membantu pembinaan konstruk “binari hak-lawan-ibadat” di ruang undang-undang, politik, serta imaginasi popular massa. Dengan merujuk kepada sumber-sumber primer yang ekstensif dan menjejak kembali kes-kes kontroversial dari kamar mahkamah undang-undang sehinggalah ke mahkamah pendapat awam, kajian ini berusaha untuk menteorikan proses “pemahkamahan agama” dan kesan-kesan terbitan daripada tindakan mahkamah ke atas kesedaran perundangan serta keagamaan popular masyarakat. Buku ini mendokumentasikan bagaimana institusi perundangan menggalakkan pertembungan ideologi, yang seterusnya mentakrifhan negara ini berserta politiknya. Dengan meninjau hubung kait antara pluralisme undang-undang, gerakan sosial, sekularisme, dan Islamisme politik, buku Mengkanunkan Agama membuka ufuk perbincangan baru tentang kesalinghubungan antara undang-undang, agama, politik dan masyarakat. Terjemahan oleh Hazman Baharom.

Document type: 
Book
File(s): 

Amending the Egyptian Constitution: Six Critical Articles that Test the Military’s Commitment to Democracy

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011-02
Document type: 
Other

It's Not a Revolution Yet

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011-02-28
Abstract: 

Although commentators have been quick to call the January 25th movement a "revolution," democracy activists are painfully aware that their struggle has only just begun. What will make the movement a true revolution, and not merely a successful rebellion against Mubarak, are institutional reforms that fundamentally reorder political life. Constitutional amendments are the critical first step to empowering representative institutions and constraining the arbitrary exercise of power. Not coincidentally, constitutional amendments also provide the key test of the military’s willingness to break from the past. 

Got Rights? Public Interest Litigation and the Egyptian Human Rights Movement

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2006-01-01

The Judicialization of Religion

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2018-10-03
Abstract: 

Throughout the second half of the twentieth century, one Muslim-majority country after another adopted constitutional provisions meant to incorporate Islam into the legal order. In what is now a familiar pattern, leaders sought to harness the legitimating power of Islamic symbolism. But rather than shore up state legitimacy, these provisions opened new avenues of contestation.

In countries where judicial institutions are robust, religion of the state clauses have helped to catalyze a “judicialization of religion,” wherein courts were made to authorize an “official” religion and/or render judgment on the appropriate place for religion in the political order. This study theorizes one aspect of the judicialization of religion through the illustrative case study of Malaysia. The study examines how shifting political context provided opportunities for activist lawyers to advance sweeping new interpretations of Malaysia’s Religion of the Federation clause and, with it, a new vision for state and society.

Document type: 
Article

Islamic Law, Society, and the State

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2018-10-03
Abstract: 

Islamic law occupies a relatively minor place in the legal systems of most Muslim-majority countries, with jurisdiction often limited to matters of family law. In a smaller number of countries, its reach includes criminal and constitutional matters as well. Yet whatever its formal scope, state claims to Islamic law frequently generate controversy and contention. There is a certain irony here: most states that seek to regulate Islamic law do so with the expectation that its role can be carefully stage managed and choreographed. Instead, state leaders more typically find themselves contending with new demands and unexpected forms of claims-making; whether from women’s groups advocating for gender equality grounded in Islam, from conservative groups calling for the adoption of an Islamic criminal code, or from liberals and secularists challenging the state’s claim to Islamic law altogether. When it comes to Islamic law, everyone has an opinion. 

Many readers will understand these struggles as a politics of tradition versus modernity. But the collection of essays that make up this special issue of Law & Society Review present a different perspective. They demonstrate that contention around Islamic law is, in fact, a quintessentially modern phenomenon. That is to say, the present-day politics of Islamic law are both unique to the contemporary era and contingent on modern state institutions for their expression and distinctive salience. This special issue focuses on what state regulation of Islamic law gives rise to—the new forms of politics it creates, the governing strategies it enables, the modes of resistance it makes possible, and the types of legal or religious consciousness it generates.

Document type: 
Article

Constituting Religion: Islam, Liberal Rights, and the Malaysian State

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2018
Abstract: 

Most Muslim-majority countries have legal systems that enshrine both Islam and liberal rights. While not necessarily at odds, these dual commitments nonetheless provide legal and symbolic resources for activists to advance contending visions for their states and societies. Using the case study of Malaysia, Constituting Religion examines how these legal arrangements enable litigation and feed the construction of a 'rights-versus-rites binary' in law, politics, and the popular imagination. By drawing on extensive primary source material and tracing controversial cases from the court of law to the court of public opinion, this study theorizes the 'judicialization of religion' and the radiating effects of courts on popular legal and religious consciousness. The book documents how legal institutions catalyze ideological struggles, which stand to redefine the nation and its politics. Probing the links between legal pluralism, social movements, secularism, and political Islamism, Constituting Religion sheds new light on the confluence of law, religion, politics, and society.

Document type: 
Book

Law in the Egyptian Revolt

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011
Abstract: 

Among the protest movements sweeping the region in the Arab awakening of 2011, the Egyptian revolt is the movement that is perhaps most defi ned by a struggle over the Constitution and the rule of law more generally. I argue that this intense focus on law and legal institutions is a legacy of the prominent role that law played in maintaining authoritarian rule in Mubarak’s Egypt. Just as law and legal institutions were the principal mechanisms undergirding authoritarian rule, opposition activists know that democracy can only emerge through comprehensive legal reform. This article examines the struggle for constitutional power in three periods – before, during, and after the Egyptian revolt of 2011.

Document type: 
Article

Protests Hint at New Chapter in Egyptian Politics

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2004-04-09
Abstract: 

The week marking the first anniversary of the US-led invasion of Iraq saw a flurry of demonstrations across Egypt. A protest in central Cairo marking the beginning of the war was followed by a series of demonstrations at al-Azhar and other major universities, as well as the lawyers' and journalists' syndicates, upon the Israeli assassination of Hamas founder and spiritual leader Sheikh Ahmed Yassin just three days later. While none of the protests matched the magnitude of those that rocked the Egyptian capital in March 2003, the constant recurrence of public demonstrations over the past year reveals much about how regional crises continue to exacerbate domestic economic and political tensions.

Document type: 
Other