SIAT - Theses, Dissertations, and other Required Graduate Degree Essays

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Gamers' personality and their gaming preferences

Date created: 
2010-07-29
Abstract: 

This thesis work researches the hypothesis that people with certain personality traits would prefer certain video game genres. The motivation is to contribute to demographic game design by identifying gamers’ personality profiles in order to better satisfy their needs and enjoyment. A Gaming Preferences Questionnaire was developed and validated to identify gamers’ preferences. The NEO-FFI questionnaire based on the Five Factor model was selected for measuring gamers’ personality traits. Data from 545 participants was analyzed by multiple linear regression. Eight game genre models were found statistically significant, and accounted for 2.6% to 7.5% of gamers’ preferences for game genres based on personality factors. The relevant personality traits of the models matched game elements of the genre. This work shows that a refined itemization helps to begin to understand the psychological human complexity that drives players’ preferences.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Steve DiPaola
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: School of Interactive Arts and Technology
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.Sc.

Policy conflict detection using Alloy: an explorative study

Author: 
Date created: 
2010-04-12
Abstract: 

Policy conflicts are inevitable in policy-based systems. Handling conflicts is considered to be so vital in policy-based system, that several policy languages introduced built-in functions to handle them. In this thesis, we investigate an innovative approach for policy conflict detection. We investigate inclusion of MDE (Model Driven Engineering) concept in the policy conflict detection method. We inspect the practicality of analysing policies along with policy language’s meta-model in order to detect conflicts. We will examine feasibility of policy conflict detection using Alloy and PML (Policy Modelling Language). In our work, we systematically explore ways of modelling policies in Alloy. We have successfully introduced proper modelling approach for policy conflict detection and analysis of the policies according to PML meta-model. However, we have also shown that a one-pass analysis of detecting conflicts in addition to analysing policies according to the PML meta-model is not achievable.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Dr. Marek Hatala
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: School of Interactive Arts and Technology
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.Sc.

A guiding hand: augmenting novice gameplay with haptic feedforward guidance

Date created: 
2011-08-16
Abstract: 

As video games continue to gain precedence outside the realm of entertainment, the potential of the medium for new uses, contexts and audiences expands. This raises the issue of how to design video games for an increasingly diverse set of players. Novice players, in particular, face a number of challenges in modern video game environments. Successful navigation and gameplay engagement are threatened by the learning curves associated with the medium’s increasing sophistication. In this thesis, I designed a vibrotactile forearm display that provides feedforward guidance for navigating fast-paced, multimodal game environments. I conducted an exploratory experiment to evaluate the effectiveness of the prototype in reducing the learning curve by improving the early performance and user experience of novice players. The experimental findings show that feedforward guidance rises tentatively to the fore; however, the haptic condition was not as effective as the visual condition. Latent factors combined with discordant performance scores, self-reports and qualitative feedback suggest that more research needs to be conducted in order to conclusively elucidate the effectiveness of haptic feedforward guidance.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Alissa Antle
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: School of Interactive Arts and Technology
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.Sc.

A gaming framework for modelling competitive service industries

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2007
Abstract: 

Due to the competitive nature of service industries, firms are often required to make sound business decisions in short periods. Errors in marketing and operations strategies can result in loss of time and money. Although computer simulation can aid in evaluating potential business models before they are deployed, the problem of making intelligent decisions becomes central to modelling rational behaviour of firms. A multi-agent based gaming framework is proposed around a market model for service providers, where decisions as to how to allocate revenue are made using a multi-criteria optimization approach. Kalman filtering is investigated as a means for estimating unknown parameters within the model, and basic consumer behaviour heuristics are implemented for reacting to market conditions. The study demonstrates that although a more sophisticated business model implementation is necessary to exhibit realistic behaviour, based on initial evaluation, the framework comprising its core technologies is capable of facilitating such models.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Christopher D. Shaw
Department: 
Communication, Art and Technology: School of Interactive Arts and Technology
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.Sc.

A Process For Creating Autostereoscopic Displays of Historic Stereoscopic Photographs

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2004
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Tom Calvert
Department: 
Communication, Art and Technology: School of Interactive Arts and Technology
Thesis type: 
(Research project) M.A.Sc.