SIAT - Theses, Dissertations, and other Required Graduate Degree Essays

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Appreciative inquiry: designing for engagement in technology-mediated learning

Author: 
Date created: 
2006
Abstract: 

Generating and sustaining engagement should be an explicit element of technology- mediated learning (TML) design for adults. Yet, little related guidance exists for practitioners in this field. This thesis investigates design elements that sustain engagement and describes a workshop protocol to help practitioners address engagement in their own context. The protocol and thesis are each framed as an Appreciative Inquiry (AI), a process that seeks to discover and build on what works well in existing systems. An evaluation study of the protocol, conducted at a bank learning centre, confirmed that the protocol is viable; participant designers created several engagement strategies. However, the findings also indicate that engagement was not a priority for participants and suggest that practitioners could benefit from a deeper understanding of engagement design. Finally, the thesis offers engagement design guidelines that advocate using: cognitive conflict, challenge, relevance, goals, experiential learning, interactivity, control, support, collaboration, uninterrupted time and fun.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
School of Interactive Arts and Technology - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.Sc.)

Generic framework for federated security enabled software systems

Author: 
Date created: 
2006
Abstract: 

There is a remarkable growth in the number of organizations providing online services, some of which are free and some are not. Federated security is a concept that allows different organizations to share access to services based on their mutual trust and user's security credentials. Different federated security solutions (FSS) come with their specifications and guidelines for interacting software components in the software system. The boundary between 'federation' and the software component is often murky, and some FSS guidelines lack stringent requirements for implementing the federation concept. In this thesis we analyze the concept of federation, and how different software components interact with each other with respect to the federation. Based on the analysis we develop a generic framework that can be used to connect any existing FSS. The generic framework provides the features that are superset of features provided by any existing FSS.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
School of Interactive Arts and Technology - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.Sc.)

Using paper prototyping as a usability testing methodology for web application development

Date created: 
2006
Abstract: 

This research focuses on prototyping methodology by studying the usability of two different prototyping media: paper and web. My intent is to conduct a quantitative analysis while attempting to follow the structure of a formal experiment in the design of user sessions. The experiment involved six participants testing the usability of a web application prototype. Three conducted the usability test on a paper prototype while the rest used a web prototype. Although this was not a formal experiment, my planning and careful design of the user sessions enabled me to collect better data. Although the sample size is small, the data quality is high. By using a quantitative approach, this study indicates that both prototyping media generate similar usability results. With thematic analysis, a qualitative approach, the research indicates that paper prototype is not as effective as indicated by the quantitative approach and other researchers’ studies.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
School of Interactive Arts and Technology - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.Sc.)

Learning to play: the design of in-game training to enhance videogame experience

Author: 
Date created: 
2006
Abstract: 

As the videogame industry continues to boom, the increase in production resources and game design experience has led to the development of increasingly more complicated games. Current videogames require the manipulation of complex physical and virtual interfaces. In-game training is now critical to the enjoyment of sophisticated and challenging game experience. The thesis first reviews the process of discovery that identified the types and capabilities of a variety of in-game training strategies. It then details the development and testing of an effective in-game training system that improves player performance without negatively affecting the experience of play. Two critical success factors are highlighted: the type of training and the timing of the training. Finally, the thesis positions games as examples of training systems that effectively engage users, and therefore as sources for educational design concepts that can increase our potential to make learning a truly rewarding experience.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
School of Interactive Arts and Technology - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

Performance evaluation of SIP based voice conferencing over the IEEE 802.11 wireless networks

Author: 
Date created: 
2006
Abstract: 

There are various types of conferencing models to transfer multimedia data such as voice and video, but they all have certain limitations when applied to the IEEE 802.11 wireless networks using handheld devices. To address these, we have proposed a conferencing architecture that improves the user scalability. We simulated the traditional Session Initiation Protocol based on existing conferencing models and our proposed conferencing model under different number of users using the Optimum Network Engineering Tool. We implemented a process node model in the application layer to create our conferencing server model. We conducted a series of simulation scenarios to measure the performance of the conferencing models in terms of user scalability and QoS. We also demonstrated how the mobile users affect the conferencing performance. Our simulation results indicate that our proposed conferencing model provides a more flexible way to expand the conferencing user scale while maintaining the required QoS.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
School of Interactive Arts and Technology - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.Sc.)

Examining stem-loops as a sequence signal for identifying structural RNA genes

Author: 
Date created: 
2005
Abstract: 

This project examines stem-loops as a means to identify structural RNA genes along genomic sequences. To undertake this task, an algorithm was developed to scan genomic sequences for stem-loops similar to those typically found in ribosomal RNA. Each stem-loop is quantified with metrics which measure length and spacing attributes. With the help of annotated genomes, we are able to calculate the mean metric values in the various domains which make up the genome. This includes coding sequences, non-coding DNA, ribosomal RNAs, and transfer RNAs. Subsequently, these values are evaluated for their ability to distinguish structural RNAs from their genomic counterparts. Our results indicate that some stem-loop metrics are capable of identifying ribosomal RNA genes in genomes across a wide range of G+C content levels. These results merit further study into this novel approach.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
School of Interactive Arts and Technology - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Project (M.A.Sc.)

Fields of interaction: From shadow play theatre to media performance

Author: 
Date created: 
2006
Abstract: 

Fields of Interaction: From Shadow Play Theatre to Media Performance examines the emerging contemporary practice of computational media performance and its genealogy through intersections across shadow play, cinema and computational media. One of the ways in which media performance can be contextualized is by looking at contemporary performance forms that emerge from different traditions and cultures. Computational media performance invites us to look at shadow play and reinterpret it, with performative action and locality of place and community in mind. This research connects interactive med ia art with Balinese community-based performance practices. This research connects interactive media art with Balinese community-based performance practices. The interactive media art, in this study, is examined with a particular focus on issues that arise from using computational technologies in the context of performance. This research is concern with the relationship between computation and performance as a two elementary axes, using hybrid research methodology that integrates artistic process and outcomes, performance theory and cross-cultural study of shadow theatre. My intellectual concerns centre on the significance of collective performance structured around the work of computational media art. I focus on two particular contexts of interactive media art practice: (1) interactive audiovisual installations and (2) media performances. These foci, through the collaborative research of the Computational Poetics Research group, have provided a variety of artistic outcomes . The composition and presentation of electronic media, using capabilities offered by computation, extend cinema with its ability to braid encoded process with various media, narrative elements and participants’ interaction in the real time of the performance. The "interaction" of performers, partakers and the elements of the work form situated media performance as inspired by the study of Balinese shadow play. The concept of braided processes, drawn from Balinese shadow play, is further investigated through a series of artistic studies and productions that employ improvisation and real-time animation of media driven by the interaction among performers, participants and materials of the work.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
School of Interactive Arts and Technology - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Dissertation (Ph.D.)

The refeatured landscape: Notes on the aesthetics of digital video

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2005
Abstract: 

This thesis explores the relationship between the emergence of postimpressionist painting and the breakdown of the camera obscura as a model for the fixed stable capacity of human vision. This relationship is posited as a possible framework for understanding digital composite-images in a broader cultural context. The construction of my video-conceptualist work Hope BC Chainsaw Carving Capital of the World is situated as the primary research object. Writings by Paul Virilio on vision will be used to construct a relationship between vision, media and the virtualization of experience that is inherent to technologically mediated environments. The idea of the space-constructed image is extrapolated from the writings of Jonathan Gary, in particular, the relationship he constructs between cultural practices, technological innovation and the aesthetics of representation acts as a model in which the composite-image can be examined in terms of a larger field of cultural practices.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
School of Interactive Arts and Technology - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Project (M.A.Sc.)

Optimal offensive player positioning and collaboration in a digital soccer game

Author: 
Date created: 
2006
Abstract: 

Player positioning is critical in many sport games; we use soccer as the example. The results of this study will help to improve digital sports games technology. In existing methods, the player calculates its desired position using current location of the ball and its own role in the team formation. The existing methods have two disadvantages: neglecting the game dynamics and leaving behind some potentially good positions without consideration; the latter being the common shortcoming of decision tree algorithms. The proposed approach is taking into account the dynamics by determining the available time horizon which limits the feasible area where the optimal position is located. To make sure that all potential alternative positions in the feasible area have been evaluated and considered, the Pareto optimality approach is used. As a result, the proposed method provides the opportunity to create an optimal dynamic formation for the whole team.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
School of Interactive Arts and Technology - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.Sc.)

Eliciting pedagogical metadata for description of learning resources

Author: 
Date created: 
2006
Abstract: 

Learning object metadata standards exist to facilitate the reusability and discoverability of digital learning resources. However, without extension, these standards are ineffective to support the assembly of learning objects into coherent, larger scale structures. Ontological capture of pedagogical metadata may be critical to developing theory-aware systems capable of recommending complementary resources. In this research, scanning 74 repositories revealed that there is very little pedagogical metadata in current repositories. Software tools are needed that offer resource designers an d instructors incentives to create and share pedagogical metadata. To demonstrate this concept, an online tool was developed to assist the creation of learning objectives conforming to the revised version of Bloom’s taxonomy of educational objectives. The effectiveness of the tool for eliciting pedagogical metadata was assessed by collecting evaluative data from users with experience in e-learning. Participants reported positive attitudes towards the effectiveness, usefulness and necessity of the tool.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
School of Interactive Arts and Technology - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.Sc.)