History - Theses, Dissertations, and other Required Graduate Degree Essays

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Between nationalism and reconciliation: the Turkish government and the dual narrativization of the battle of Gallipoli, 1923-2007

Author: 
Date created: 
2008
Abstract: 

This thesis explores the attempts of various Turkish governments to construct two independent narratives, for two separate audiences, around a single site, the Gallipoli peninsula, and the battle that took place there in 1915 between Ottoman military forces and French and British imperial units. Using archival records from Britain and evidence collected at Gallipoli, this study will demonstrate the production of an unusual type of narrative - a narrative of reconciliation - aimed at drawing foreign populations to Gallipoli. Complicit in the production of this reconciliatory narrative, the Turkish government simultaneously constructs a Turkish nationalist narrative of the battle of Gallipoli for its own citizens. This thesis will examine the reasons for and processes of dual narrativization undertaken by successive Turkish governments between the early 1920s and the present, as well as the subsequent, unforeseen consequences of this endeavor.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
T
Department: 
Dept. of History - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

Manufacturing global Indianness: Bollywood images, 1995-2005

Author: 
Date created: 
2008
Abstract: 

This project has analyzed changing image cultures in Bollywood in the context of globalization of the Indian economy and the impact of new materialism in India. Bollywood melodrama has been transformed not just in terms of a revitalized production, but through a rearticulation of the Indian identity that shows radical shifts from the premises on which modern Indianness was based. The ever-increasing circulation of the films implicates the Indian diaspora as both subjects and consumers of contemporary narratives. By incorporating the context of the diaspora in North America and the rising middle-class in India, this study has analyzed how a transnational Indian identity within popular films is constructing a discourse of global Indianness. It has demonstrated how the expansion of the terrain on which Indianness is being expressed has a considerable impact on representations of Indians anywhere.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
L
Department: 
Dept. of History - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

The religious allegiances of sixteenth-century peasant rebels

Author: 
Date created: 
2005
Abstract: 

The peasant revolts which occurred frequently throughout the sixteenth century all included an inherent religious dimension. Historians have tried to place the peasants' religious allegiances within confessional boundaries. However, peasants determined their own religious priorities from the variety of movements created by the Reformation. The peasants who rebelled in the German Peasants' War of 1525 were inspired by Reformation teachings, especially the emphasis on the Gospel, yet rejected the exhortations of both radical and moderate reformers. English peasants participating in Kett's Rebellion of 1549 absorbed the Evangelical messages of Christian equality and justice, yet Traditionalist, Evangelical and folk practices decisively influenced their actions. French peasants who revolted in 1561 and 1578-80, during the Wars of Religion, rejected confessional divisions; instead, Catholics and Protestants cooperated. The actions of sixteenth-century peasant rebels demonstrate that they did not simply follow religious leaders but chose their own religious allegiances.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Department of History - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

Without a “dog’s chance:” the Devlinite Irish News, Northern Ireland’s “trapped” nationalist minority, and the Irish boundary question, 1921-1925

Author: 
Date created: 
2008
Abstract: 

Between 1920 and 1922 Ireland was partitioned and two new polities emerged: the overwhelmingly Catholic and nationalist Irish Free State, and Northern Ireland, which was largely Protestant and unionist. These polities were not homogeneous, however, and the existence of a small unionist minority in the Free State and a more significant nationalist minority in Northern Ireland necessitated the establishment of a Boundary Commission in order to redraw the border. This thesis is a study of Northern Ireland’s divided nationalist minority and their relationship with Southern nationalists during the period between the onset of partition and the collapse of the Boundary Commission in 1925. While my focus on the relationship between Northern and Southern nationalism is itself unique, “Without a ‘Dog’s Chance’” breaks new ground by demonstrating how Northern Ireland’s nationalist minority represented an example of what Israeli anthropologist Dan Rabinowitz has called a “trapped minority.” My use of the hitherto ignored poetry that appeared in Northern Ireland’s nationalist press also sets this work apart from the existing historiography. Whereas the trapped minority model provides a way of conceptualizing Northern nationalism as a component of the wider Irish nationalist movement, incorporating poetry into the discussion of the relations between the trapped Northern minority and the Irish “mother nation” reveals a new dimension to the feelings of angst, betrayal, and victimization that were embedded in the politics of Northern nationalism. Although this project concentrates on the constitutionally-minded supporters of West Belfast MP Joseph Devlin and the Devlinite Irish News, their border-dwelling Sinn Féin competitors are by no means ignored. While Free State strong-man Kevin O’Higgins was unequivocally correct when he suggested that tensions between the Devlinites and the Sinn Féiners were exacerbated because the former did not have “a dog’s chance of getting out of the Boundary area” and the latter did, this thesis argues that individuals belonging to both political traditions witnessed the diminishment of their nationalist credentials after partition. Feeling under-valued, abandoned, and exploited by their peers in the South, the nationalists of Northern Ireland were also marginalized within a host state that regarded them with fear and suspicion.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
J
Department: 
Dept. of History - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (Ph.D.)

Zancouver: Iranian women migrants in Vancouver B.C., 1978-2007

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2008
Abstract: 

This thesis examines the migration of Iranian women to Vancouver, B.C., between the period 1978 through 2007. One of the most significant factors influencing this migration was the Iranian revolution of 1978-1979, although Canadian immigration policy also impacted the migration of Iranian women to Vancouver during the last quarter of the twentieth century. This study utilizes oral history interviews with Iranian women to analyze the multiple reasons for their emigration from Iran and subsequent settlement in Vancouver. It demonstrates the internal diversity of Iranians in Vancouver in terms of their reasons for leaving Iran and coming to Canada, their political affiliations, religious beliefs, personal value systems, and attitudes regarding class and status. These differences have resulted in feelings of divisiveness and distrust amongst Iranian women in Vancouver and have inhibited the development of a sense of community based on a shared national background for Iranians in Vancouver to date.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Andrea Geiger
Department: 
Dept. of History - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

Colonizing minds: public education, the textbook Indian, and the struggle for settler hegemony in British Columbia, 1920-1970

Date created: 
2008
Abstract: 

This thesis examines the relationship between public education, the representations of indigenous peoples as the Textbook Indian in secondary school textbooks, and the struggle for settler hegemony in British Columbia between 1920 and 1970. In drawing inspiration from Marxist Theory and critical pedagogy, this work shows how education in general and textbooks in particular were powerful tools of a project of colonizing minds. The colonizing minds project refers to the state’s process of manufacturing and manipulating public education to justify and rationalize colonialism and the development of settler society in British Columbia to students as commonsensical. This thesis argues that the colonizing minds project was subtly refashioned over time to reflect the needs, struggles, and changing historical circumstances of settler society in British Columbia during the twentieth century.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
M
Department: 
Dept. of History - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

Reluctant imperialism: depicting empire in 1960s Anglo-American film

Date created: 
2008
Abstract: 

This thesis explores the myriad ways films can contribute to our understanding of historical events and culture. More specifically, it examines how the political climate of the 1960s is reflected in filmic depictions of historical events in the Middle East. I argue that it is not coincidental that the three films that I chose for this project—Lawrence of Arabia, Khartoum and Exodus—all depict a reluctance toward imperialism. Rather than romanticize British control over this region, these films clearly portray the British imperial machine negatively, with the protagonists continually subverting colonial authority. I argue that this phenomenon of “reluctant imperialism” is a clear reflection of the changing political climate of the 1960s, when the direct colonialism of the British Empire was being replaced by the indirect imperialism of the United States. That these popular films all play to this sentiment indicates that the Western viewing public approved this change.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
D
Department: 
Dept. of History - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

The broken past: World War II in Ernst Junger's later work

Author: 
Date created: 
2005
Abstract: 

This thesis examines the impact of World War II on the wartime and postwar works of Ernst Junger. It demonstrates how the destruction caused by the war convinced Junger of the immense danger of technological domination and was key to his conclusion that history had ended. Jungerls critique of the nihilistic postwar world is linked to similar claims made by prominent nineteenth and twentieth century French and German critics of modernity and his philosophy of history is traced back to the ideas of Vico, Burckhardt, Nietzsche, and Spengler. His interpretations of the causes and consequences of the war are placed into the larger context of the shifting interpretations of Germany's problematic past and linked to the ideas propounded by conservatives immediately after the war and those expressed by revisionists in more recent years.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Department of History - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

Conservative revolutionaries" - a study of the religious and political thought of John Wise, Jonathan Mayhew, Andrew Eliot and Charles Chauncy

Date created: 
2008
Abstract: 

The careers of Massachusetts Congregationalist pastors John Wise (1652-1725), Jonathan Mayhew (1720-1766), Andrew Eliot (1718-1778) and Charles Chauncy (1705-1787) extended over a crucial period of religious and socio-political change between 1680, just 47 years after the first settlement of Massachusetts, and 1787, only four years after American independence. Detailed study of the four New England ministers thus provides a unique opportunity for consideration of important historical issues, including: 1), causal connections between religious thought and activity and the origins of the American Revolution; 2), 18th century meanings and understandings of the key concept of liberty; and 3), the extent to which allegedly more liberal theological thinkers directly influenced revolutionary ideology in 18th century New England. This dissertation is the first work to compare and contrast the lives and ideas of all four influential Massachusetts ministers in ways that facilitate direct contributions to these important areas of academic debate. Beginning with an account of Wise, which serves as an historical benchmark for those of the three later figures, it does so primarily through individual case studies of them and through substantial reinterpretations of their intellectual legacies. The major new conclusions to emerge from this study are that Wise, Mayhew, Eliot and Chauncy were more conservative figures than scholars have often portrayed and that a traditionalist, dissenting, Protestant worldview was more significant in shaping their religious and political thought than contemporary philosophical influences. Their understandings of liberty, which were foundationally spiritual in origin and definition, were central to this Weltanschauung. They thus provide clear evidence of the extent to which the four ministers' "revolutionary" ideas and inclinations, such as they were, were arguably consistent with those of many similar intellectual leaders in 18th century New England, in that they were stimulated and informed more by religious than by strictly political motivations and concerns.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
J
Department: 
Dept. of History - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (Ph.D.)

Blurring boundaries: The transmission of millennial information across the seventeenth-century Judeo-Christian frontier

Date created: 
2008
Abstract: 

This study explores the manner in which religious ideas transcended political, geographical, linguistic, and religious frontiers in the seventeenth century. Focusing on the Judaic Sabbatian movement in the Ottoman Empire and the Christian Fifth Monarchy Men in England, this project examines the networks of communication that merch ants, diplomats, and millenarians utilized in order to spread millennial news between these two locations and groups. As such, this study blurs the boundary between the Sabbatian movement and Fifth Monarchy Men by highlighting their interconnections and simultaneously provides insight into early-modern cross-religious interactions and globalization.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
L
Department: 
Dept. of History - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)