History - Theses, Dissertations, and other Required Graduate Degree Essays

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Re-examining Uganda’s 1966 crisis: The Uganda People’s Congress and the Congo rebellion

Date created: 
2013-05-10
Abstract: 

Historians of Uganda have generally viewed the 1966 Crisis in Uganda as an inevitable clash between two opposing forces, the Uganda People's Congress national government and the government of the Kingdom of Buganda, trying to settle colonial-era rivalries in the post-independence era. As such, these authors focus solely on internal causes for the 1966 Crisis and fail to consider the impact of Uganda’s regional and international relations on politics within the country. This thesis argues that the 1966 Crisis can only be understood in the context of Uganda’s new and complex international relations after independence, particularly the consequences of the UPC’s intervention in the Congo Rebellion from 1964 to 1965. It will consider how the government of Uganda’s participation in the Congo Rebellion was aided by Uganda’s new relations with the outside world, and how this intervention in turn destabilized politics within Uganda and prompted Obote’s coup d’état on 15 April 1966.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Thomas Kuehn
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Department of History
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.

The Evolution of Chinese Graves at Burnaby's Ocean View Cemetery: From Stigmatized Purlieu to Political Adaptations and Cultural Identity

Date created: 
2013-09-19
Abstract: 

This thesis analyzes the practice of racism against the Chinese community in Vancouver-area cemeteries, and how it was modified by trans-Pacific political and cultural forces. It shows how, at Burnaby's Ocean View cemetery, the Chinese community moved away from segregation in the burial place and progressed to burial designs that responded to its cultural and religious needs. It analyzes the abandonment by some Chinese immigrants of their tradition of disinterment and repatriation to China, when they chose to be buried there rather than at Vancouver's Mountain View cemetery. It also argues that the Chinese community of the Lower Mainland modified its own burial traditions in a manner different from anywhere else in B.C., as a result of the wave of immigrants from Hong Kong in the 1980s-90s. These changes transformed the design, architecture and burial practices at Ocean View, and helped form a new physical Chinese identity in that landscape.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Nicolas Kenny
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Department of History
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.

The golden speculum: a history of the Vancouver Women's Health Collective, 1970-1983

Date created: 
2013-01-10
Abstract: 

The enormous practical changes to women’s health care that have taken root since the late 1960s can be directly attributed to the work of the women’s health movement. Particularly in the United States, the movement relied on feminist self-help strategies including self-education, sharing information, the hands-on practice of cervical and breast self-exam, and the creation of laywoman-operated clinics. Self-helpers destabilized the naturalized authority of the medical professional and asserted that women were the true experts on their own bodies. This thesis examines the work of the Vancouver Women’s Health Collective (VWHC)—the first women’s health organization in Canada to take up feminist self-help strategies—from its inception in the early 1970s until the early 1980s. This thesis traces the movement of feminist ideas across the US-Canada border and analyzes the VWHC’s relationship to Canadian feminisms, the state, and the mainstream medical system.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Elise Chenier
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Department of History
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.

“Livability is the victim of street prostitution”:the politics of the neighbourhood and the rightward turn in Vancouver’s west end, 1981-1985

Date created: 
2013-07-26
Abstract: 

Vancouver in the 1980s was undergoing restructuring necessary to reorient the city towards a global economy in the midst of a national recession. In Vancouver’s West End, the number of people selling sex on the streets had been steadily increasing since the mid-1970s. In 1981 some residents, in order to secure their “right to peace and quiet” and guarantee the “livability” of their neighbourhood, formed a group called CROWE (Concerned Residents of the West End) with the singular objective of driving sex workers from the residential streets of the West End. The legal changes that decriminalized the status of being a prostitute in 1972 had been fought for and won by feminists and civil libertarians in the context of a more progressive political climate and a degree of economic prosperity. In the shifting political and economic tides of the early 1980s, these feminist legal gains were fought against by CROWE’s organizational offshoot Shame the Johns, the mayor, and the police force in a successful push for new laws to more heavily criminalize street prostitution. This thesis examines the new politics that emerged at the grassroots level in the fight against street prostitution and highlights the local role in federal policymaking. This local struggle culminated in the introduction into the Criminal Code of a new law criminalizing street prostitution in 1985. As some gay men, seniors, and straight West Enders joined forces in their successful fight for the streets, their new coalition redefined neighbourhood belonging, ideal urbanism, and community safety through an exclusionary and punitive lens.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Karen Ferguson
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Department of History
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.

Vancouver Longshoremen, Resilient Solidarity and the 1935 Interruption: Company Unionism 1923-1945.

Author: 
Date created: 
2013-01-15
Abstract: 

This thesis challenges the historiography that asserts the waterfront strike in Vancouver in 1935 was a failed militant surge by a new radical leadership in an otherwise twenty-year period of dormancy among the city's longshoremen. Using union documents, employer records, and interviews with workers, the thesis presents the entire company era, between 1923 and 1944, as a period of developing solidarity and resistance. In this context the 1935 strike and the union's leadership were a product of, not a radical departure from that continuity. The thesis shows that despite two lost strikes in 1923 and again in 1935, the administrative structures the employers established produced a resilient culture of solidarity that was in place before Partiament acted in 1944 to provide longshorement with the legal framework for union representation.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Mark Leier
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Department of History
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.

Theosophical socialists in the 1920s Okanagan: Jack Logie's Social Issues Summer Camps

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2005
Abstract: 

The religion of Theosophy was a significant influence in Canada's early socialist movement. Although the influence of Theosophy has been examined in the socialist movements of the United States and the United Kingdom, the work that has been done in Canada has been limited to 1890s and 1920s Ontario. The socialist 'heartland' of Canada in the early twentieth century was British Columbia and the influence of Theosophy there was profound. Theosophy cannot be conflated with the Christian social gospel, whose influence is well documented. By examining a series of political retreats co-sponsored by the Federated Labor Party and the Theosophical Society and organized by Jack Logie in Summerland, B.C. in the 1920s, these connections are brought into sharp relief.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Department of History - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Project (M.A.)

Print and protest: A study of the women's suffrage movement in nineteenth-century English periodical literature

Date created: 
2005
Abstract: 

The journey toward equal citizenship for women in England during the nineteenth century was a complex one, characterized by many failures and some successes. This journey can be traced through the writing of women in periodical literature during the nineteenth century, with particular attention to periodical literature between 1850 and 1900, where debates over women's suffrage contributed to broader arguments about women's rights as citizens and the power that denied them those rights. Suffragist discourse in periodical literature was a conscious strategy used to negotiate increased political rights and influence middle-class opinion, but also one that failed to lead to obvious results. Nevertheless, the cumulative effect of suffragist debates found in the periodical contributed to a growing awareness of the arguments for women's rights among the English middle classes, making the periodical a unique testament to the power of protest through print.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Department of History - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

The Chinese-Canadian news presses' coverage of Canada's recognition of the People's Republic of China and its effects on the Vancouver Chinese community, 1968-1972

Date created: 
2005
Abstract: 

This research project examines the diverse and competing responses of Vancouver's Chinese community to Canada's diplomatic recognition of the People's Republic of China in 1970. It investigates the reasons and underlying forces that shaped the position of the proponents and opponents of recognition. Additionally, this project considers how the recognition debate or controversy relates to the historical development of overseas Chinese organizations and nationalism. Vancouver-based Chinatown News and Chinese Times, which represented the opposing stances in the debate, provide the source materials. They are also the subjects because they shaped the local Chinese community's political and cultural discourse. Few studies on recognition include the wider perspective of the Chinese immigrants and their descendents. This project shows that the Canadian-born Chinese turned their stance on recognition into an open challenge against the postwar hegemony of the traditional ethnic associations and the overseas Chinese identity that they perpetuated. This transformation was conflict-ridden.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Department of History - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Project (M.A.)

""Thames Valley cotton pickers"": Race and youth in London blues culture

Date created: 
2005
Abstract: 

This study addresses the reception of African American blues music and the ensuing production of English blues in London from 1955 to 1966. It concentrates on London adolescents' unexpected fascination with a musical style that they virtually had no contact with prior to 1955, while analyzing how this immersion in African American culture shaped their cultural identity. Analysis of the influence of African American blues music in London during this period highlights the BBC's weakened influence as a producer of culture for youth, the subsequent increased popularity of American-sponsored radio, and the eventual romanticization of the blues amongst teens. Examination of album covers, radio programs, and liner notes tracks how this mythology developed amongst English youth while asking why the English understanding of the blues persona was infused into the youth culture of London and enacted in a venue that defined new urban space for youth.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Department of History - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

Neither this nor that: The hyphenated existence of Chinese children growing up in twentieth century North America

Author: 
Date created: 
2005
Abstract: 

This project takes its evidence from Chinese North American authors who have written about their own lives or those of members of their immigrant community. Authors such as Denise Chong, Wayson Choy, Ben Fong-Torres, Amy Tan, and Yuen-Fong Woon have written autobiographical fictions, fictionalized biographies, and family histories that delve into Chinese communities in Canada and America. These authors have opened windows into the personal worlds of their communities, and this project attempts to analyze what can be seen. Although racism is discussed in all the literature, it remains peripheral to themes of connections to China, family dynamics, generational conflicts, and formal and informal education. Through their historical novels or fictionalized ethnographies they attempt to understand their families and cultural history, to come to terms with their hyphenated existence, and to assuage their existential angst at being viewed as neither 'this nor that,' neither 'truly' Chinese, nor 'truly' Canadian.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Department: 
Department of History - Simon Fraser University
Thesis type: 
Project (M.A.)