History - Theses, Dissertations, and other Required Graduate Degree Essays

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Muhibb Al-Din Al-Khatib : a portrait of a Salafi-Arabist (1886-1969)

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1991
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
William Cleveland
Department: 
Arts and Social Sciences: Department of History
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.

Fighting Joe Martin in British Columbia

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1976
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
H.J.M. Johnston
Department: 
Arts and Social Sciences: Department of History
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.

Historical experience and the fictional imagination in the era of fascism : a study of Thomas Mann's "Dr. Faustus"

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1978
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Jerald Zaslove
Department: 
Graduate Studies : Special Arrangements
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

A mind made whole : a study of Charles Brockden Brown. --

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1971
Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Michael Fellman
Department: 
Arts and Social Sciences: Department of History
Thesis type: 
Thesis (M.A.)

The Anglo-Asante War of 1873-1874 : a narrative and analysis.

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1968
Abstract: 

The purpose of this study is two-fold. First, it is intended to be the narrative of a war which resulted in a radical change in British policy on the West Coast of Africa. Second, it is an attempt to assess, in military terms, the manner in which the British conducted their campaign against the Asarite in 1873-1874. The information upon which the study is based was secured primarily from the Colonial Office Confidential Print, the Sessional Papers of the British Parliament, and several edited collections of documents - notably those compiled by J.J. Crooks, G.E. Metcalfe, and C.W. Mewbury. In addition, however, works published by many of the participants themselves proved to be invaluable. Although studies published by V/.V.T. Claridge, U. Kimble, and W.E.F. Ward were used somewhat extensively, secondary materials provided little more than background information. As an introduction, the growth of British involvement on the Gold uoast and the development of the Anglo-Asante dispute is traced from the time of the first British contact with the region up to the very eve of war. The study then proceeds to examine in detail the conduct of the campaign against the Asante. Finally, because the official documents and much of the primary source material present a distorted view of the roles played by the various participants, an attempt is made to re-evaluate the - IV - performance of those participants. This approach has revealed that much of what was written of this war was either biased or incomplete. For example, Colonel R.W. Harley, the Administrator of the Gold uoast until October 1S?3, was a ?who received little recognition for his role in the war yet he is revealed as a man who accomplished much in the face of almost overwhelming odds. Similarly, the Fanti tribesmen, who were consistently reviled for their laziness and cowardice at this time, emerge in a considerably better light. In addition, the role which Captain John Glover, R.M., played in the war is proven to have been much more significant than hitherto acknowledged. Above all, Major-General Sir Garnet Uolseley, who is often referred to as one of Britain's greatest generals, is proven in this instance to have been a soldier of far less merit than previously supposed.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Alexander Peter Kup
Department: 
Arts and Social Sciences: Department of History
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.

The Collins' Overland or Russian Extension Telegraph project : a pioneer attempt to establish telegraphic communication between North America and Europe.

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1968
Abstract: 

The primary significance of the Collins' Overland Telegraph or Western Union Russian Extension is as a chapter in the history of communications. A pioneer attempt to establish telegraphic communications between North America and Europe, via Bering Strait, the Collins* Overland Project was ultimately a failure. The successful laying of an Atlantic cable by Cyrus Field in 1866 removed the basic raison d etre of the overland route and led to the halting of construction. While a failure in the sense that the project did not succeed in establishing an intercontinental communications link, it did bring important secondary benefits to both British Columbia and Alaska. It was, in other words, a relatively successful failure. In British Columbia mining and exploration were stimulated and the internal communications system of the colony vastly improved. In Alaska the telegraph expeditions were responsible for the first systematic examination of the flora, fauna and geology of the area. Members of the telegraph project were thus able to play a minor but significant role in the purchase of Alaska by providing much useful data on the valuable new territory. The study of the Collins1 Overland scheme was made easier by the literacy of the members of the project. The many unpublished papers and diaries as well as published memoirs which survived the scheme form the basis for the thesis. Especially helpful were the published documents made available by the Western Union Telegraph Company. Three published articles, Charles Vevier's "The Collins' Overland Line and American Continentalism" , 2 Corday Mackay's "The Collins' Overland Telegraph" , and J.S. Galbraith's "Perry McDonough Collins at the Colonial Office" , provided a starting point and in some cases references to documents otherwise unavailable.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
G.L. Cook
Department: 
Arts and Social Sciences: History Department
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.