Gerontology - Theses, Dissertations, and other Required Graduate Degree Essays

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Ethical issues in the use of surveillance cameras to support ageing in place

Date created: 
2020-11-17
Abstract: 

Background and Objective: Surveillance technology allows family members to monitor older adults’ daily activities and their interaction with the home environment. In particular, video surveillance cameras and surveillance technology’s implementation raises critical ethical concerns due to their invasive and obtrusive nature. Thus, this paper aims to address the ethical issues regarding the use of video surveillance for older adults to age in place. Methods: A literature review is conducted using Springerlink, Sciencedirect, and PubMed Publications related to older adults’ care, ageing in place, and the use of surveillance technologies were included in this project. Results: A total of 19 publications met the inclusion criteria. Nine ethical issues emerged from the data: informed consent, privacy, conflict of interest, stigmatization and obtrusiveness, homogeneity among older adults, and imbalance relationship. These nine themes were further explored in respect to ethical principles, including autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence, justice and fidelity) Conclusion: Although surveillance cameras can be invasive, well-grounded ethical thinking and proactive response help reduce the risk and ethical challenges associated with it. By examining the ethical issue in video surveillance, it helps to reflect and enhance the current legislation.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Andrew Sixsmith
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Department of Gerontology
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.A.

I belong to Canada: The role of Neighbourhood House for the mental health of older visible minority immigrants

Author: 
Date created: 
2020-12-10
Abstract: 

Considering Canadian immigration trends, the current aging of the country’s population, and access issues related to services that promote the mental health needs of older visible minority immigrants, more attention is required to understand the role of organizations that offer programs and services to this population group. Using qualitative inquiry and the PRECEDE-PROCEED model, this study aims to determine to what extent programs and services available in the Neighbourhood House sector contribute to the mental health of older visible minority immigrants as understood in the VicHealth Framework.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Sharon Koehn
Habib Chaudhury
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Department of Gerontology
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.

A critical analysis of continuing care systems, integrated care strategies, and policies: Assessing the success of Canada, Denmark, and Australia

Author: 
Date created: 
2020-08-18
Abstract: 

In recent years there has been a call for the development of integrated continuing care systems in Canada. Such systems would provide older adults and informal caregivers with a comprehensive continuum of integrated supports, linking formal and informal health and social care to improve efficiencies. The purpose of this study was to examine how an integrated continuing care system can be developed in BC to address limitations and gaps in service. The study was informed by a critical public policy and a systems approach. A multi-pronged longitudinal methodological strategy was utilized and entailed: 1) Analysis of BC’s home and community care system; 2) Document analysis; and 3) Comparative analysis of systems and reforms in other jurisdictions (Ontario, Québec, Nova Scotia, Australia, and Denmark). Data were collected through a) interviews in 2014/15 and 2019/20 with stakeholders in BC and a small number of key informants for each comparison jurisdiction; b) analysis of government policy documents; and c) review of literature and other information sources. Key deficits identified in BC included: lack of a clear vision for home and community care; gaps and fragmentation in the care continuum; lack of investment in home and community care; and lack of supports for informal caregivers. Similar deficits were experienced in many of the comparison jurisdictions, but there also were areas of policy divergence. One of the identified points of tension for integrated care approaches was the fine line between the substitution of services and downloading of responsibilities. A key recommendation for BC is that the lens through which policy is being developed needs to be adjusted and moved away from simply viewing home and community care as substitutes for acute and residential care. Furthermore, the ambiguous position of continuing care in Canada is contributing to the marginalization, medicalization, and underfunding of continuing care systems. It is concluded that a funding model for continuing care needs to be developed at the national level, which has become particularly apparent during the COVID-19 pandemic. Additional recommendations include improving supports for informal caregivers, providing a broader range of community-based supports, shifting care paradigms, and strengthening the integration of services.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Andrew Wister
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Department of Gerontology
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) Ph.D.

Understanding transitions from hospital to shelter/housing: Perspectives of people with lived experience of homelessness

Author: 
Date created: 
2020-08-26
Abstract: 

People with lived experience of homelessness (PWLEs) have poorer health and higher rates of hospital admissions than stably housed persons. However, PWLEs are often discharged from hospital to unsupportive settings that do not meet their complex health needs, resulting in ongoing and worsening health conditions and prolonged recoveries. To expand on current understandings of hospital-to-shelter/housing transitions and to investigate the differences between younger and older PWLEs, this study conducts a secondary data analysis of 20 in-depth interviews with 11 younger (<45 years) and older (>45 years) PWLEs. Findings are organized into three categories: 1) Self-rated health and healthcare use; 2) Discharge planning; and 3) Recovery and follow-up care. Differences between older and younger PWLEs are highlighted. Identifying challenges of hospital-to-shelter/housing transitions and supports needed provides an avenue for healthcare and shelter/housing providers to improve service delivery.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Habib Chaudhury
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Department of Gerontology
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.

Intergenerational perceptions of family care: Examining non-dyadic baby boomers and adult children of boomers

Author: 
Date created: 
2020-09-18
Abstract: 

The aging of the baby boomer (BB) generation (1946-1965) presents unique challenges for those planning future care contexts. Limited research has examined anticipated care perspectives of both BBs and adult children (AC). Drawing upon a critical life course perspective, this study aims to: (1) examine family care perceptions of BBs as future care recipients and non-dyadic AC of BBs as potential caregivers; and (2) explore perceived societal supports for family caregivers. Two focus groups of BBs (n=10) and two of AC (n=9) were conducted between January and March 2020. Thematic analyses revealed congruent and non-congruent generational viewpoints within four overarching themes: individual outlooks, social locations, and proximity; family preservation/care norms; perceived aging realities and plans; and negotiating contemporary care. Analyses also identified perceived systemic gaps and opportunities in community supports for aging families. Findings are discussed in relation to supporting those giving and receiving care across generations.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Barbara Mitchell
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Department of Gerontology
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.

relational practice in long term care

Author: 
Date created: 
2020-08-17
Abstract: 

This critical ethnography explores the concept of relationality from the perspective of nurses working in long term care. The existing literature on this concept, in this context, has mostly focussed on allied health professionals. Data was collected through field observations, solicited diaries, and semi-structured interviews conducted with seven nurses working in long term care. A theory of relational work was used to inform a reading of, and thinking through the research process, data collection and analysis. The findings from this study indicate that nurses privilege the relational in their work, seek out opportunities to cultivate family-like relationships with residents, and see hands-on care as an opportunity to strengthen feelings of connection with the people they care for and with. These findings have potential implications when considering appropriate skill-mix in long term care and for re-evaluating the meaning of nursing work to nurses who work in these settings.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Sharon Koehn
Barbara Mitchell
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Department of Gerontology
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.

Mental health and perceived loneliness among widowed older adults: Exploring the effects of gender and social support

Author: 
Date created: 
2019-12-16
Abstract: 

A mixed methods study was conducted to examine the association between poor mental health and loneliness among widowed older adults aged 65 and over, accounting for differential effects of gender and social support. The life course theory, social support and stress theory, and feminism/masculinity theories were used to frame this research. Data from the Canadian Community Health Survey (2008/09) was analyzed using a subsample of 4,163 widowed respondents. A hierarchical linear regression analysis was conducted to examine loneliness, mental health, and potential buffering of social support and gender interaction. These analyses were supplemented with qualitative interviews conducted with 20 widowed older adults to further explore experiences, challenges and coping strategies. Integrated findings reveal the mediating role of social support. Implications of the findings suggest the salience of resilience over the life course, mediating effects of social support, the gendered effects of widowhood, exploration of longitudinal studies and placing a greater focus on widowed older adults’ ethnic backgrounds. Suggested interventions include the expansion of bereavement services and intergenerational programs.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Andrew Wister
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Department of Gerontology
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.

Characteristics of wisdom in older adults: A review of the literature

Author: 
Date created: 
2019-07-08
Abstract: 

Wisdom is an ancient and elusive concept, one with great relevance for the world today. Climate change, global political instability, and the increasingly complex problems facing humanity make wisdom particularly important now. There are notable parallels between how world leadership does not provide the needed urgent attention to the challenge of climate change, environmental stewardship, and human rights, and how elders are dismissed and diminished in many societies. Elders in the past were revered for their wisdom; unfortunately, their vital role in current society has shifted due to the fast pace of life and technological advances, with many wondering whether the challenges associated with these issues will serve humanity or contribute to our demise. This literature review will highlight: the intersections between ancient and contemporary views on wisdom as it relates to life satisfaction; intelligence versus wisdom-related knowledge; the importance of religion and spirituality to older adults; and mortality and ethics in society.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Habib Chaudhury
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Department of Gerontology
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.A.

An exploration of pathways, motivations, and experiences among older Jewish volunteers in Vancouver

Author: 
Date created: 
2018-08-14
Abstract: 

Volunteering has been shown to benefit older adults in numerous ways, often leading to improved health outcomes, increased social connections, and providing a sense of meaning and purpose. However, knowledge with regards to the volunteer experiences of older adults who belong to ethnocultural minorities is limited. The goal of this study was to explore the pathways, motivations, and experiences of older Jewish adults who volunteer within the Jewish community of Vancouver. Qualitative research methods were utilized, including semi-structured interviews with twenty-one older adult volunteers (age 55+), and two volunteer staff. The findings provide further insight into the pathways, motivations, and experiences of this specific ethnocultural minority, and the unique ways in which Jewish culture influences their volunteer experiences. These findings have potential practice implications for the creation of inclusive, culturally-sensitive volunteer programs for older adults, and how to best recruit and retain older adult volunteers.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Andrew Wister
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Department of Gerontology
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.

Exploring the motivations and experiences of middle and older aged adult rock climbers: SSHRC grant funding proposal

Date created: 
2018-05-14
Abstract: 

Lifelong adherence and attachment to physical activity, recreation, and leisure among older adults is an evolving topic; however, very little research has been conducted on older adults engaged in what is termed ‘serious leisure activity.’ One growing type of serious leisure activity is rock climbing. The aim of this Capstone Project is to develop a mock SSHRC grant funding proposal (Insight Development), which is established from a background review of literature and a small exploratory pilot project. The research grant proposes to compare and contrast the experiences and motivations of middle and older aged (50+) rock climbers with a matched sample of aquatic fitness participants. The data collected as part of the preliminary qualitative-based Pilot Project were analyzed using a thematic analysis. Four major themes were identified and incorporated into the mock grant proposal: continued and increased participation; unique lifestyle characteristics; experiential and intrinsic rewards; and camaraderie and social context. The findings point to strong activity attachment, social network effects, and suggests that meaningful modes of physical activity encourage lifelong, engaged participation.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Supervisor(s): 
Andrew Wister
Department: 
Arts & Social Sciences: Department of Gerontology
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.A.