Geography - Theses, Dissertations, and other Required Graduate Degree Essays

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The Canadian contribution to the geography of air transport/Air transport and economic development: the case of northern Canada.

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1972
Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Eliot, M.E.
Department: 
Geography
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.A.

Limitations of the travel-cost technique : implications for outdoor recreation policy/ The industrial growth of Metropolitan Toronto between 1949 and 1958 : analysis and observations.

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1972
Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
G.P.F. Steed
Department: 
Geography
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.A.

Data interoperability across borders : a case study of the Abbotsford-Sumas aquifer (British Columbia-Washington State)

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2004
Abstract: 

The ability to integrate data from multiple sources is central to geographic information science (GIS).  Although data integration is an active field of research in the GIS community, a number of challenges remain unresolved. Interoperability research addressing data integration challenges experienced by institutions in an international setting also remains sparse. Groundwater is an example of an environmental phenomenon which does not respect political borders, and its management requires data from multiple jurisdictions. The Abbotsford-Sumas aquifer, straddling the Canada US border, is used as a case study to explore integration challenges in an international setting. Development of groundwater management practices to ensure a sustained source of good quality groundwater is dependent, on an understanding of the conceptual model of the aquifer. Due to a lack of geophysical studies, geological information contained in the water well reports, is the chief source of depth-specific lithological information. The use of this information in constructing the conceptual model is constrained by poor data quality and a lack of an integrated and standardized lithological database. To achieve the research goals of exploring integration challenges in an international setting, lithological datasets from BC and Washington State are integrated. The resultant lithological database is used to test the usability of water well reports for constructing the conceptual model. Numerous interoperability challenges such as data availability, lack of metadata, data quality and formats, database structure, semantics, policies and cooperation are identified as inhibitors of data integration. Despite the numerous challenges the lithological database is useful in constructing a generalized conceptual model. This research is important as it presents challenges to data integration that should be considered as a starting point for environmental management projects.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
N. Schuurman
Department: 
Geography
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.Sc.

Knowledge management in planning community-based ecotourism: toward community empowerment

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2002
Abstract: 

This essay aims to inspire empirical research on the state and management of knowledge for planning community-based ecotourism (CBE). It contextualizes a problem observed in the World Wide Fund for Nature from an epistemic perspective. Literature selected from various fields is used to argue that active, systematic knowledge management within and between remote communities - is required for effective public participation in the planning process. Discussions link knowledge, community empowerment and innovation, and suggest that communities depend heavily upon local planning agents for access to knowledge. The conclusion, therefore, is that research efforts should concentrate upon these agents.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
A. M. Gill
Department: 
Geography
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.A.

The future of the Maritime Provinces: an application of the Delphi approach

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1975
Abstract: 

This essay argues that geographers should contribute more to futures research. The identification of consensi shared by people on desirable alternatives for change is shown to be a promising field of investigation for behavioral research, regional planning and geography teaching. The Delphi technique--a research procedure widely employed by "think tank" organizations but seldom by geographers in university departments--appears to be a powerful tool to this end. The methodology involves the use of experts in a situation of anonymous debate with the view of achieving a consensus of opinions relative to uncertain issues. After reviewing the pertinent literature dealing with futures, the paper reports on a prototype study conducted in the Madawaska region, a French-speaking enclave located in North-Western New Brunswick. A group of college students and community leaders were enrolled in a Delphilike experiment designed to explore how citizens view the geography of their region, how their understanding of the problems facing the region could be increased and what regional futures they apprehend as possible, probable and desirable. In a preliminary exercise, the students identified 123 changes which might come about in the Mari times. The list was then circulated to all participants who rated each change according to its perceived probability and expected date of occurence and its foreseen acceptability to the people. The results were then collated and fed back to the participants who reviewed their earlier opinions and rated the changes according to their perceived social desirability. The predictive power and substantive content of the resulting "collective forecast" are briefly analysed. Lists of likely and unlikely changes are produced using an index derived from the postulates of current futures models. The views of the Maritimes held by the student and non-student subgroups closely approximate each other. The sample is concerned with the quality of life based on increased mobility, decentralization and recreation opportunities, provincial rather than local or Maritime issues and agriculture and ocean resources rather than conventional industrialization. A critical review of the experiment directs its replication in the same and in other culture areas for purposes of geographical theory building, education of the participants and "time prospecting" proper.

 

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Robert Brown
Department: 
Geography
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.A.

Classical models of urban structure and Nigerian towns: an examination and proposal/Yoruba houseform

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1971
Abstract: 

It is often claimed in the geographical literature that the concentric zone, sector and multiple nuclei models of urban structure, as developed in the United States, have cross-cultural applicability. This paper attempts an application of these models to Nigeria 's Old Towns, which have been in existence since before the period of British colonisation. These Old Towns have a dual character related to indigenous and colonial phases of growth. The old, pre-colonial section of the town expresses traditional Yoruba urbanism, whereas the new section was grafted to the former by the British colonial government in the early part of this century. Ibadzm, one of Nigeria's principal Old Towns, is used as the main example in this study. The classical models were developed with certain basic socioeconomic assumptions which are valid in North America but not in Nigeria. Two analytical proposals to account for the structure of Nigerian Old Towns are suggested. The extended family system and the institution of chieftaincy lie at the core of the first proposal.

These social institutions are seen to account for the forms both of the urban residential quarters and the central nucleus in the older section of the towns, where the king's palace, the main market and are religious building are located. The form of the new section that grew up in the early part of this century is a result of the colonial government policy of separating the various Nigerian immigrant ethnic groups and the non-African community from the indigenous town. This policy, which constitutes the basis for the second proposal, is termed the principle of ethnic separation. The application of these two proposals constitutes the major portion of the paper and it is suggested that these two sets of factors offer a superior explanation of the present structure of Nigerian Old Towns than is offered by the now traditional concentric zone, sector and multiple nuclei generalisations.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Len Evenden
Department: 
Geography
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.A.

Tashme, British Columbia, an existing nonentity/Discrimination patterns with change in population size of urban centers : a case study of Indians in southwestern British Columbia.

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1971
Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
P. L. Wagner
Department: 
Geography
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.A.

Advancing Tsunami Risk Communication through Geographic Visualization

Date created: 
2014-10-29
Abstract: 

Advancements in geovizualization research and technologies present new opportunities to develop sophisticated risk communication strategies in at-risk coastal communities. This thesis seeks to improve tsunami risk communication in coastal communities through the development of new empirical methodologies, conceptual frameworks, and visualization prototypes through several key research contributions. The development of a conceptual framework for 3D visibility analysis presents an opportunity to assess the visibility of tsunami evacuation sign placement in Seaside, Oregon. Further geovisual research is established through the development of a mixed reality visualization interface that enables in situ visualization and simulation of geographic phenomena. This interface is then applied to the visualization and simulation of tsunami events in Ucluelet, British Columbia. This research provides the groundwork for future usability studies on the effectiveness of mixed reality visualization for risk communication.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Nick Hedley
Department: 
Environment:
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.Sc.

Differential Policy Mobilities: Transnational Advocacy and Harm Reduction Drug Policy

Author: 
Date created: 
2014-12-16
Abstract: 

Geographers have recently taken an interest in how urban policies are produced and mobilized. The effects of how policies are realized on urban landscapes have significant recourse regarding how everyday life is understood and experienced. This dissertation examines what happens to the policy, the people, and the places in which a specific drug policy model, harm reduction, is advocated for and implemented. In doing so, it addresses the tactics and techniques that are assembled in order to advocate for policy change globally. The paradoxical relationship between the increasing regulation and punitive approaches to drug use and the cheaper, purer drugs that flood illicit drug markets has resulted in increasing social and health crises for people who use drugs including social exclusion, human rights violations, and increased risk of disease. Harm reduction is an alternative policy seeking to minimize the physical, psychic and social risks associated with illicit drug use. It is a public health approach that serves as an alternative to dominant moral (criminalization) and medical (addiction-as-disease) models commonly invoked in these debates. Harm reduction is also a global social movement focused on the use of illegal drugs, issues of equality, social justice, and human rights. This dissertation addresses questions about how harm reduction drug policy is advocated for, constructed, mobilized, and implemented across cities in Europe, North America, and the Caribbean in specific relation to the geographies of transnational activism, focusing on: the role of institutional policy activists, the political nature of evidence based policy making and its attendant technologies and practices, and spatial strategies that sustain global advocacy over time. These questions correspond to broader conceptual debates over understandings of policy making and mobilization as well as the politics of urban public health. Using qualitative, multi-sited research methods, this research contributes to recent calls for a new relational comparative approach to studying cities. By examining policy advocacy networks across the Global North and South, I provide unique insight into the various social, political, institutional, and spatial mechanisms that produce successes and failures in policy mobilization. I conclude by considering new directions in understanding spaces of urban public health and what that may mean for understanding political geographies of the city.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Eugene McCann
Department: 
Environment:
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) Ph.D.

Re-imagining the geography of the favelas: pacification, tourism, and transformation in Complexo do Alemão, Rio de Janeiro

Author: 
Date created: 
2014-12-15
Abstract: 

This thesis examines the recent intersection of two forces, complementary and competing: pacification and favela tourism in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Rio’s favelas have long been considered archetypal neighbourhoods of poverty and crime. Pacification involves a military and police occupation of targeted communities, to control drug cartel-related violence. Complexo do Alemão is a cluster of fifteen favelas, transforming through pacification and tourism at a rapid pace, both materially and discursively. This research involves a comprehensive look at these forces in Alemão, incorporating results from my 2013 field research, including interviews with residents and guides. Tourism in Alemão has seen mixed success; still, it brings unique benefits to the local population, such as protection, accountability, and a means to reclaim occupied space. In addition, favela tourism is an integral tool to tackling the stigmatization of favela residents as talentless criminals, part of a larger reshaping of ‘favela’ in the geographical imagination.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Geoff Mann
Paul Kingsbury
Department: 
Environment:
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.