Geography - Theses, Dissertations, and other Required Graduate Degree Essays

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Multispectral video and supplementary reconnaisance photography remote sensing for delineating sedge stem density, Westham Island, British Columbia/Third world remote sensing and Indonesian application

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1993
Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
A.C.B. Roberts
Department: 
Geography
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.A.

Parks and resource policy: the role of British Columbia's provincial parks, 1911-1945/Price Lake moraines: neoglacial chronology and lichenometry study.

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1974
Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Frank Cunningham
Department: 
Geography
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.A.

The development of a model for the life cycle of a closed agricultural colony/The Mennonite colonies of South America/The Mennonite colony of Spanish Lookout, British Honduras

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1971
Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
P. Wagner
Department: 
Geography
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.A.

Wilderness management: problem of survivial of a resource/ The West Coast Trail : a qualitative approach to the evaluation of recreation

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1972
Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Timothy O'Riordan
Department: 
Geography
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.A.

Subcultural variations in responses to the urban environment

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1969
Abstract: 

This research examines variations in man-environment relationships within contemporary industrial cities through a case study conducted in the city of Vancouver, British Columbia, with the two major aims of adding to cultural geographical knowledge of human behaviour and of aiding in the achievement of good environmental quality for all city residents. Specifically, it attempts to explain, in terms of cultural background the differences in the responses of a group of social welfare clients and a group of company directors to their environment. Some past and current geographical postulates are examined and found to be derivative of cognitive theory. This type of psychological theory is in turn reviewed and rejected in favour of a "mediation model" developed by C.E. Osgood and based upon stimulus-response principles. From this model and a consideration of the relations between the concepts of social class and culture, two hypotheses are advanced for testing: that the study groups will have significantly different perceptions of the City of Vancouver and that the connotative meanings of those landscape objects which are perceived by both groups will be significantly different. The testing of these hypotheses involved conducting two interviews with each of 30 subjects. The first, to discover their perceptions, used a questionnaire modified from one used by planner K. Lynch. It was found that the first hypothesis was valid, although a zone of overlap including five landscape objects occurred. To test whether the connotative meanings of these five objects were different for the study groups, a semantic differential test developed by C.E. Osgood was employed and it was discovered that the second hypothesis was true only for two of these objects. In the conclusion, the limitations of the study are discussed and its implications for both cultural geography and landscape change in the city are examined. It is suggested that Osgood's model of human behaviour is worthy of further study by geographers, that the semantic differential test is a useful addition to the repertory of techniques available to those studying man-environment relations and that human perception and meaning be considered as major variables, along with economics, in decisions on planned landscape change in the city.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
P.L. Wagner
Department: 
Geography
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.

Intraspecific diversity in trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides, Salicaceae) in Waterton Lakes National Park, Alberta: a biogeographic perspective

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1990
Abstract: 

Trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx), a clonal angiosperm, is the most geographically widespread tree in North America. It is widely thought that most extant populations in the western interior of Canada and the United States became established shortly after glacial retreat, but sexual recruitment effectively ceased soon thereafter owing to inimical climatic conditions. Six populations of P. tremuloides were studied in the prairie and montane environments of Waterton Lakes National Park, Alberta. Vegetative tissues were analyzed for electrophoretically-detectable variation in 13 enzymes encoded by 16 loci, 14 of which were polymorphic. Six populations maintained high levels of interand intra-population diversity (P = 0.891; H = 0.319; A= 2.4). The mean fixation index, F, was -0.102 indicating some deviation from Hardy-Weinberg expectations. Genetic differentiation (FsT = 3.0) was apparent in this ecologically diverse, but geographically small spatial setting. Some of this structure was attributed to the effects of selection. The pattern of allele frequencies was analyzed in relation to a surrogate measure of fitness, mean annual increment of ramets, which revealed the presence of a significant, albeit weak, positive correlation between growth and heterozygosity. This was interpreted as evidence of balancing selection acting to maintain diversity. A chemical analysis of dormant twigs for crude protein, macro- and micro-chemical elements, and fiber demonstrated that there were considerable differences between clones within populations and between sites. The relative intensity of browsing by mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) and elk (Cervus elaphus) also varied substantially between clones and between sites. Correlation analysis of browsing intensity with chemical composition demonstrated that herbivory by ungulates was not linked to protein, elemental composition, or fiber. Moreover, it is unlikely that selective feeding is cost effective given the nature of chemical differences between clones. It is postulated that while herbivores may affect genetic diversity, the precise effects are random with respect to the assayed chemical components. In conclusion, it is suggested that the maintenance of diversity in the absence of modem-day recruitment, and resistance to geographic differentiation in a spatially heterogeneous environment is largely due to clonality, specifically, the species' phalanx growth habit and concomitant physiological integration between ramets, the combination of which spreads the risk of death and buffers the effects of selection over time and space.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
I. Hutchinson
Department: 
Geography
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) Ph.D.

Problems of ecological balance in a tropical forest environment: a case study of Khmer history/Symbols and cinema: a study in cultural landscapes/Henry James: critic in exile

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1969
Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Philip Wagner
Department: 
Geography
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.A.

A grey systems analysis of water quantity allocation and quality protection in Xiamen, China

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1991
Abstract: 

This study was designed to introduce the concepts of grey systems theory into water resources management as a means for accounting for uncertainty, and to conduct a grey systems analysis of the tradeoffs between meeting water quantity/quality objectives and maximizing economic income in the specific case of Xiamen, China. The literature on water resource systems analysis was reviewed to arrive at an understanding of how water quantity and quality problems were analyzed and incorporated, how uncertainty was accounted for, and what cases have been studied in water quantity and quality management. The literature revealed that ( 1) previous studies of water quantity and

quality management were related to river or lake basins, and none was about a canal basin with strict water quality requirements; (2) none of the studies in China combined both quantity and quality problems in an optimization framework; and (3) no previous study attempted to communicate uncertain messages directly into optimization processes and solutions. This study has developed a grey linear programming (GLP) model for water quantity allocation and quality planning, and advanced a new solving approach which can effectively incorporate uncertain messages into the optimization framework. This method has been applied to water quantity and quality management in a water delivery canal in Xiamen, China. Results of the case study indicate that the derived decision schemes are feasible for the study area. When the canal water quality has precedence, the scheme for

lower limit of objective function has to be adopted. Under this alternative, less cropping area, manure application and livestock numbers, and no fertilizer application are programmed. When agricultural income has precedence, the scheme for upper limit of objective function can be adopted. Under this alternative, more cropping areas, manure application and livestock numbers, and some fertilizer application are programmed. Therefore, decision makers can adjust the grey decision variables (including cropping area, manure and ferti1izer applications and livestock numbers) within their grey intervals according to the detailed situations. Reliability of the method has been proved through sensitivity tests of the impacts of pollutant loss constraints on agricultural income, the costs of reducing pollutant losses, the impacts of water quantity constraints on agricultural income, and the effects of grey inputs on grey outputs.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
R.D. Moore
Department: 
Geography
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.Sc.

The significance of lithology in debris torrent occurrence in three regions of British Columbia/ The Mahaweli project of Sri Lanka : an evaluation of the irrigation system performance

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1990
Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
J.T. Pierce
Department: 
Geography
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.A.

Peasant development in Guyana/ Areal pluralism as revealed in some characteristics of the cultural geography of Trinidad, W.I.

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1975
Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Frank Cunningham
Department: 
Geography
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.A.