Contemporary Arts - Theses, Dissertations, and other Required Graduate Degree Essays

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Monitoring [A Doll's House]

Date created: 
2012-11-26
Abstract: 

Monitoring [A Doll’s House] is a performance-installation that sits somewhere between theatre and visual art. The project consists of three scheduled theatrical performances (based on Henrik Ibsen’s play A Doll’s House) and an installation with performances transmitted through Skype. It testifies to a continued interest in notions of distance and privacy as well as everyday surveillance. As defined in the context of my research on presence in theater performances, it investigated the interrelation between presence and absence, by exploring the distances that exist between various elements of the performance: the distances between the actors and their characters, the actors and the audience and the 'time of the play' and the 'time of the performance'. Using Gilbert Simmondon’s idea of individuation and milieu, the project explored liminality in the presence of the performance. Featuring seven actors who were performing four main characters from Ibsen’s play, the project examines the construction of character through the audience’s perception and actors’ embodiment.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Video 01: Monitoring [A Doll’s House], Performance Video, Pegah Tabassinejad, 4 cameras, 01:00:49 hr., 2012.
Video 02 (file#1): Monitoring [A Doll’s House], Installation Video#1 (Actors), Pegah Tabassinejad, 03:52:07 hr., 2012.
Video 02 (file#2): Monitoring [A Doll’s House], Installation Video#1 (Actors), Pegah Tabassinejad, 03:52:07 hr., 2012.
Video 02 (file#3): Monitoring [A Doll’s House], Installation Video#1 (Actors), Pegah Tabassinejad, 03:52:07 hr., 2012.
Video 04: Monitoring [A Doll’s House], Installation Video #2 (The Whole view), Pegah Tabassinejad, 01:07:09 hr., 2012.
etd7608_PTabassinejad_supp_006.mp4
Senior supervisor: 
Steven Hill
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: School for the Contemporary Arts
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.F.A.

ReCall

Author: 
Date created: 
2012-10-12
Abstract: 

This document focuses on the choreographic process of ReCall, a dance-theatre work that employs choreographic devices through gesture and stories related to the tragedy of September 11th, 2001. The creative process included workshops in dance technique and devising with various collaborators and disciplines. This production was designed to kinesthetically engage the audience through shifting the expectations of the tradition of concert dance.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
The video Document of ReCall
Senior supervisor: 
Rob Kitsos
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: School for the Contemporary Arts
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.F.A.

The other stage

Date created: 
2012-09-28
Abstract: 

An interactive electroacoustic music composition and solo mixed-media performance realized as an alternatively-staged one-night concert event. This project examines the tradition of staging live electronic music and the role of a solo computer music composer-performer. It is a four-movement interactive work with an appended generative music system performed solo within an alternative stage layout. It is derived from an interdisciplinary practice of combining electroacoustic music and electronic dance music performance practices. This thesis project also includes custom built performance software and an interactive audio visual performance apparatus. It is an exploration of cybernetics in electroacoustic mixed-media performances that lends itself to the development of a personal compositional style.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
Senior supervisor: 
Arne Eigenfeldt
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: School for the Contemporary Arts
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.F.A.

Murky colors

Author: 
Date created: 
2012-09-14
Abstract: 

"Murky Colors" is an expansive 47-minute multi-narrative, single channel video derived from the artist's father, Menjin Wei's suspense-spy novel of the same name. Collaged together documentary and appropriative strategies explore the personal and political processes at work in adapting Menjin's made-for-Hollywood story. Appendix A is the research paper written in FPA 812, and consists of two parts: an introduction to, and a chapter from a hypothetical book written in the context of the MFA's malleable framework of interdisciplinary-academic practice. This meta-text combines the personal– in the form of transcribed conversations and narrative fragments centered around the making of "Murky Colors", with the political– in the form of a historical exploration of Hollywood Classical Realism and its avant-garde counterpart, video art. While the introduction conceptualizes the whole arc of the dissertation, the chapter focuses on the question of critical distance in self-ethnography, and refers back to the introduction.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
etd7477_CWei_supp_001.mp4
Senior supervisor: 
Judy Radul
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: School for the Contemporary Arts
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.F.A.

Almost everywhere

Date created: 
2012-09-14
Abstract: 

Centred around the theme of uncertainty and the limits of reason and inquiry, the research I do has shaped my practice in a manner that allows for digressions, tinkering and experimentation. My thesis project is the result of this entangled and seemingly chaotic practice. It consists of a video-installation that attempts to intervene in the programmatic processes that allow for understanding by blurring the borders that distinguish one element from another. At the core lies an affinity with the absurd and the theoretical limits of its antithesis – logic and pure reason. While realizing my thesis project, I have fluxed between exercising strict control and letting go; permitting interventions and allowing improvisations to destabilize the decision-making process. The work that comes out of this process problematizes the notion of the 'finished' work of art.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
This short video clip (0:50 seconds) documents ALMOST EVERYWHERE as it was installed in the gallery
This file is a compressed version of the video component for ALMOST EVERYWHERE 20:46 minutes
Senior supervisor: 
Judy Radul
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: School for the Contemporary Arts
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.F.A.

In-between

Date created: 
2012-09-17
Abstract: 

A five-channel video installation featuring documentation of the artist performing in semi-vacant lots around False Creek and on the site of the Vancouver Olympic Village residential complex. Recomposing the usual co-extensive body/environment relationship, the artist’s performative action, rolling across the spaces, serves as a radically empirical mode of measurement, challenging the more typical measures of land value (rental, capital, and market) and the possibilities of vertical urban development. Playing with the captured video footage in postproduction, its malleability expands the accomplished performative actions and highlights the rhythmic and dynamic properties of the sites through a process of spatiotemporal restructuring. The installation, presented at the Audain Gallery, relocates the actions and the sites in which the original performances and documentation took place.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Video 01: South East False Creek 1, Mariane Bourcheix-Laporte, Single-channel video, 21:11 min., 2012.
Video 02: North East False Creek, Mariane Bourcheix-Laporte, Single-channel video, 28:11 min., 2012.
Video 03: Olympic Village 1, Mariane Bourcheix-Laporte, Single-channel video, 15:51 min., 2012.
Video 05: South East False Creek 2, Mariane Bourcheix-Laporte, Single-channel video, 52:03 min., 2012.
Video 04: Olympic Village 2, Mariane Bourcheix-Laporte, Single-channel video, 16:39 min., 2012.
Senior supervisor: 
Jin-me Yoon
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: School for the Contemporary Arts
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.F.A.

Theatricalizing Fernando Pessoa and his heteronyms: research, writing, rehearsal, and performance of The Last Seven Words of Fernando Pessoa

Date created: 
2012-04-12
Abstract: 

This document focuses on the playmaking process of The Last Seven Words of Fernando Pessoa, a theatre piece that examines identity through an imagined encounter of Portuguese poet Fernando Pessoa and his literary concept of heteronyms. The process includes two years of research, workshops, various collaborations, several drafts, and seven weeks of rehearsal. This ensemble piece weaves text, movement, and music together to present Pessoa’s life of multiplicity. The creative process employed a mixed method (hybrid) of traditional script creation, devising, and a de-hierarchization of performance modes. The play questions traditional staging in order to engage an audience.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
The Last Seven Words of Fernando Pessoa Documented Performance
Senior supervisor: 
Steven Hill
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: School for the Contemporary Arts
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.F.A.

Aphotic Dream

Date created: 
2012-11-01
Abstract: 

One hour and ten minutes theatre production of Aphotic Dream, written and directed by Fay Nassiroghli. The production took place at Studio T at SFU (Goldcorp Campus). Aphotic Dream was a multidisciplinary piece combining dance, text, lighting, surround audio system and music. Aphotic Dream included a cast of eleven people from diverse cultural and professional backgrounds as well as 4 major collaborators in the areas of lighting, sound and audio design, dramaturgy and directing. The audience were brought into the room by the ushers individually in the dark and were sited in their individual sits on the stage where the action of the play was also taking place. They were surrounded by six channels speakers in their close proximity. All of the music and the audio cues were built from the scratch specifically for the show to accompany the text and the conceptual ideas of the project. The majority of the play was in the dark as the artist’s intention was to enhance sensory responses for the audience. Aphotic Dream consisted of three acts focusing on a political, sexual and social aspect of the lives of three people within the marginalized groups linked by theme of betrayal. Aphotic Dream was a combination of dance and theatre exploring erotic spaces and the interstitial spaces within the realm of human condition.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Steven Hill
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: School for the Contemporary Arts
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.F.A.

Sign painting

Date created: 
2012-09-24
Abstract: 

My MFA thesis project titled Sign Painting includes five oil paintings. Each painting contains two words squished together, eliminating the space between them: BOXINGGRIN, WHISKYMUSTACHE, SLOWAMBULANCE, PERISHOW, GRIZZLEND. In my painting practice I provocatively invite words into the visual space of oil paint. The provocation comes from the idea that language, which is verbal, and paint, which is purely visual, are opposed. But I have found that language inevitably asks to be painted. Poetic language suits paint because it is especially abstract, often with unusual syntax, and radically departing from regular language. For me, paint and language are in relationships that touch on abstraction, contingency and temporality. The abuttingness of words and the gooeyness of oil paint generate potential – implying other words, other colors, other compositions, ad infinitum. While at first they might appear strange in paintings, words belong.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Allyson Clay
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: School for the Contemporary Arts
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.F.A.

Surface production: The replication and display of objects

Author: 
Date created: 
2012-09-24
Abstract: 

Surface Production: The Replication and Display of Objects is a photo-sculptural installation comprised of trans-mounted photographs, polyurethane plastic forms, mid-nineteenth century French furniture, construction paper and various other materials. This thesis project explores the topic of object display and addresses the privileging of visual surfaces in contemporary media-saturated, screen-based cultures. Through integrating photographic media into the structural components of sculpture – layering and reconfiguring a variety of materials – the relationship between objects becomes more complicated and slows down the reception of information by the viewer. The strategy of temporal realignment in the space of the gallery, counters the trivialization and simplification of our daily semiotic encounters. As a result, the viewing experience is characterized by a suspension of conclusive thinking regarding individual components of the work and their subject matter. The installation thus emphasizes the relationships formed between this constellation of objects and the associational relations of meaning that emerge.

Document type: 
Graduating extended essay / Research project
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Jin-me Yoon
Department: 
Communication, Art & Technology: School for the Contemporary Arts
Thesis type: 
(Project) M.F.A.