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Memory Studies and the Eighteenth Century

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Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2019-01-17
Abstract: 

In Memory in Culture, Astrid Erll contends that if we want to understand the various crises of the present, we need to consider the “mental, discursive, and habitual paradigms that were formed in long historical processes – via cultural memory.” In the current climate of debates about the national past, it is timely to take stock of the field of memory studies, as such studies can help us understand, as Ann Rigney suggests, “how stories about the past emerge as common points of reference and, in the process, help to define collective identities.” This article will provide some background to the field of memory studies and discuss two important new directions in the field: a concern with the mediation of memory and an interest in postcolonial, transnational, and “traveling” memory. The specific objective is to consider the relevance of memory studies for scholars of 18th‐century literature and, conversely, the relevance of 18th‐century literature for the field of memory studies. The broader aim is to encourage further work that will focus attention on the constructedness of even the most long‐standing and pervasive national memories.

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Article
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Imagining the Miscellaneous Nation: James Watson's Choice Collection of Comic and Serious Scots Poems

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Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011-09-01
Abstract: 

As the first published anthology of Scottish poetry, the Choice Collection of Comic and Serious Scots Poems has long been regarded as a milestone in Scottish literary history. But acknowledgments of the Choice Collection's importance have historically been coupled with criticisms about its content. In particular, the Collection has been taken to task for its seeming disregard for genre or tone. This essay seeks to reevaluate the assessment of the Choice Collection as a “flawed” text by considering the Collection in relation to several contemporary miscellanies. Furthermore, it investigates the national impulse behind Watson's employment of this particular genre. Recognizing the competing interests at stake in the Scottish political landscape of 1706, Watson uses the imaginative space of the miscellany to bring readers of different tastes and interests together to promote the cause of Scotland at a time when the nation's very existence was under threat. Such a rereading of Watson's collection also contributes toward a reevaluation of the impression that Scottish literature after the Act of Union is pathologically split, a reflection of what G. Gregory Smith referred to as the “Caledonian antisyzygy.”

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Article
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Between Archive and Repertoire: Astley's Amphitheatre, Early Circus, and Romantic-Era Song Culture

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2019-12
Document type: 
Article
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From Fingal's Harp to Flora's Song: Scotland, Music and Romanticism

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2000-04
Document type: 
Article
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Negotiating Cultural Memory: James Currie’s Works of Robert Burns

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2010
Document type: 
Article
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Scottish Literature and “Engl. Lit.”

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2012
Document type: 
Article
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Back to the Future: Remembering the 1707 Act of Union in the 2014 Referendum Campaign

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2015-12-15
Abstract: 

Discusses the political rhetoric , imagery, and arguments, used in the debates over the 1707 Act of Union between Scotland and England, and traces their reuse in the debates that preceded the Scottish Referendum on independence in September 2014, depicting the 1707 act, not as an historical inevitability, but as "an anomalous success" after a century of earlier attempts at an incorporating union and as "a site of contestation long after its ratification."

Document type: 
Article
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A New Perspective on the Scottish Diaspora

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2009-05
Document type: 
Article
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Student and Faculty Surveys on Digital Humanities Labour and Training

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Abstract: 

Appendix A is the collated results of Faculty Researchers Survey carried out for the article "Student Labour and Training in Digital Humanities." Digital Humanities Quarterly 9.2 (Spring 2015).

Appendix B is the collated results of  Student Researchers Survey carried out for the article "Student Labour and Training in Digital Humanities." Digital Humanities Quarterly 9.2 (Spring 2015).

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Other

Index of Contributors to Crucible Magazine, 1932-1943

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014-11
Abstract: 

Crucible was a Canadian literary magazine that ran from March 1932 to April-May 1943. Crucible has been largely left out of historical surveys of Canadian little magazines, and turning our attention to Crucible now can provide us with an alternative perspective on Canadian culture through the 1930s and 1940s. Further, we cannot overlook the fact that Crucible was edited by two women: Hilda and Laura Ridley. As Dean Irvine points out in Editing Modernity: Women and Little-Magazine Cultures in Canada, 1916-1956, Hilda Ridley “should now be recognized (albeit belatedly) as one of the first woman editors of a modern literary magazine in Canada” (206). The Ridley sisters were pioneers not only for their own efforts as editors, writers, and marketers but they were also champions of poetry authored by women. To continue overlooking Crucible is to ignore a significant repository of Canadian women’s voices echoing throughout this time period. 

 

This index is arranged by contributor. Works attached to known pseudonyms or initials are grouped together beneath the most complete name and spelling inconsistencies (such as Today versus To-day) have also been left as they originally appeared.

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Article
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