Education - Theses, Dissertations, and other Required Graduate Degree Essays

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Minorités (in) visibles et leadership dans l’enseignement supérieur au canada: les expériences des leaders d’origine africaine

Author: 
Date created: 
2016-05-19
Abstract: 

L’objectif de notre recherche est, dans une visée compréhensive, de documenter l’expérience de leadership des minorités (in)visibles dans l’enseignement supérieur canadien, en prenant l’exemple spécifique des Africains noirs, pour questionner l’ouverture à la diversité linguistique, ethnique et culturelle de l’enseignement postsecondaire canadien. L’étude permet d’explorer les défis et les opportunités de ces leaders noirs, d’appréhender leurs parcours socioprofessionnels, de souligner les facteurs qui leur ont permis d’atteindre ces postes à responsabilités. Les résultats de la recherche ont mis en exergue le fait que les défis sont de taille pour l’université canadienne qui, en ce début de 21ième siècle, peine encore à s’ouvrir à la diversité ethnique et culturelle, et ce, malgré la loi et la politique du multiculturalisme canadien des années 1980.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Marianne Jacquet
Department: 
Education: Faculty of Education
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) Ed.D.

Place-based and Technological Learning Environments which Reflect Indigenous Perspectives and Build an Ecology of Place

Author: 
Date created: 
2016-06-10
Abstract: 

This Masters thesis is a case study of a remote indigenous community off the north coast of British Columbia in a place called Hartley Bay. It focuses on the Gitga’at community school, called Hartley Bay School, and the intertwining of “Place-Based” learning environments with Technological learning environments. This study uses a mixed-methods approach and relies most heavily on both survey (PLACES and WEBLEI) and interview tools but also implemented a myriad of other triangulation instruments. The curriculum implemented was based on the BC Curriculum guides and utilized a cross-curricular approach. Hartley Bay School is a remote village school which has about 30 students. This study focused on a class of 7 students from grades 6-8. Students participated in the Lu lax kyook Ecological Monitoring Project which combined Science, Math, Socials, English, and Media Visual Arts curriculums. Lu lax kyook is an estuary about 5 minutes away from Hartley Bay on boat.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
David Zandvliet
Department: 
Education: Faculty of Education
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.

Technology disruptions and related problem solving experiences of mid-career elementary teachers

Author: 
Date created: 
2016-09-28
Abstract: 

Elementary teachers have increasing access to classroom digital technologies but barriers to classroom technology use continue to be reported. In this case study of one urban British Columbia school district, the researcher uses multi-case analysis to explore the experiences of 7 mid-career elementary school teachers who are implementing digital technology in their classrooms. Findings indicate that disruptions continue to necessitate the use of problem solving strategies and supports by teachers. Further, teachers’ choice of problem solving techniques does not always ensure continued use of the technology they incorporate into their plans. The discussion examines some of the more common disruptions reported by teachers and how context shapes the success with which they address disruptions.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Kevin O'Neill
Shawn Bullock
Department: 
Education: Faculty of Education
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.

Students’ Cultural and Personality Factors as Predictors of their Asynchronous Online Discussion Behaviours

Date created: 
2016-08-15
Abstract: 

This study investigated the predictive relationships between cultural/personality factors and online speaking behaviours. First, when reporting online discussion behaviours, previous studies often emphasized the collective group processes, minimizing the individual perspective within the group. The current study conceptualized and tested several individual communicative acts of online speaking behaviours as outcome variables. Individual communicative acts will help us identify the inner workings of group processes that will expand our understanding of discussion behaviours in nuanced ways. Second, previous studies relied heavily on demographic characteristics to predict online discussion behaviours. Often, studies used the citizenship of students as a proxy for cultural characteristics and assumed their online discussion behaviours to be monolithic across the collective, ignoring their individual differences. These concerns were addressed by directly assessing cultural values and personality traits that were hypothesized to be causally proximate to online speaking behaviours. The current study used specific scales to directly measure those factors at an individual level--something that has often not been considered in previous studies. Finally, multilevel modeling procedures were used to predict relationships between cultural/personality factors and online speaking behaviours. It is important to account for group interactions in online discussions, but was often neglected in previous studies. Results of the study confirmed that a student’s level of certain cultural/personality factors (conscientiousness, agreeableness and low context- based cultural values), significantly predicted multiple online speaking behaviours. Results also documented several interaction effects between collectivistic values, individualistic values and openness to experience traits, with students’ local discussion groups on multiple online speaking behaviours. Extroversion, low power distance, and neuroticism were identified as potential predictors for future exploration. In conclusion, results of the study confirmed cultural and personality factors to be useful predictors of online speaking. Personality traits in general directly predicted several online speaking behaviours. However, cultural values did not. Further, the local discussion group context of students significantly moderated cultural and personality factors in predicting online speaking behaviours.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Alyssa Wise
Department: 
Education: Faculty of Education
Thesis type: 
(Dissertation) Ph.D.

Observations in a Thinking Classroom

Date created: 
2016-08-12
Abstract: 

A Thinking Classroom is a classroom where students are engaged collaboratively in tasks designed to help with learning new concepts. It is a classroom where students are guided by the teacher and actively seek understanding from each other. Current research on Thinking classrooms is prescriptive in describing strategies for teachers to implement in order to break down existing classrooms norms and put in place new norms that are conducive to students working together and solving problems. I have implemented such a Thinking Classroom and in this thesis I look at what students and teachers are doing in a Thinking Classroom. Through analysis of classroom video, conclusions indicate that high mobility of students and ideas, autonomous behaviour in students, and a significant amount of class time spent on tasks were some of the observations that were noticed in a Thinking Classroom.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Peter Liljedahl
Department: 
Education: Faculty of Education
Thesis type: 
(Thesis (Education) ) M.Sc.

Pedagogical efficacy of argument visualization tools

Author: 
Date created: 
2016-07-27
Abstract: 

The purpose of this research was to investigate the instructional effects of argument visualization tools (AVTs) by developing and evaluating the use of a tool called the Dialectical Map (DM). In a laboratory experiment, each of 125 participants was randomly assigned to one of three groups: a DM Group that studied with the DM and received training on argumentation concepts, an Argue Group that received argumentation training only, and a Control Group that received no training and did not use the DM. Pre-test data were collected on participants’ basal free-recall ability and judgment of learning. After studying an expositional text on fracking, participants gave a judgment of learning and were tested on critical thinking, recall and comprehension, and argumentative writing. Studying with the DM increased confidence in learning, recall and comprehension, and the use of argumentation in a writing task. In addition to the laboratory experiment, three semester-long classroom implementations were conducted with undergraduate students. Both the instructor and students expressed positive attitudes with their DM experiences. Findings from this thesis provide an insight into prior research on educational benefits of AVTs and have instructional implications for incorporating effective AVTs, such as the DM, in classrooms. Future research will continue on gathering data from multiple settings to improve the design and applications of the Dialectical Map.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
John Nesbit
Department: 
Education: Faculty of Education
Thesis type: 
(Dissertation) Ph.D.

Social Benefits of Digital Gaming for Older Adults: The Example of Wii Bowling

Author: 
Date created: 
2016-03-21
Abstract: 

This research study investigated whether playing a digital game, Wii Bowling, with others can enhance the social lives of older adults. Our research used a mixed methods approach. Quantitative results showed that participants’ perceptions of social connectedness increased and loneliness declined over an 8-week period. Qualitative results described participants’ positive perceptions of their interactions with others, conversations with family and friends, social connections, and the team experience relating to playing in the multi-week, multi-location Wii Bowling tournament.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
David Kaufman
Department: 
Education: Faculty of Education
Thesis type: 
(Dissertation) Ph.D.

Understanding Intersubjective Perceptions of Respect in Policing

Author: 
Date created: 
2016-05-19
Abstract: 

This phenomenological study aims to provide a deeper understanding of respect in the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP). Twelve (12) employees were interviewed to determine their individual perceptions and experience of respect, and to explore if there were differences in their perceptions based on motivational patterns and purpose orientation. The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) and the Human Relations Incident (HRI) instruments were used to examine attitudes, motivational patterns, purpose orientation and perceptions of self and others. The majority of individuals in this study, as measured by the MBTI, had Sensing-Thinking-Judging (STJ) and Guardian (SJ) values and motivations, consistent with other studies of police personnel studies. Participants self-identified their role as guardians of the law, based on the HRI scores. This was divergent from that of the organization and public perception of the police as a helping profession. All participants expressed having experienced both respect and disrespect. Descriptions of respect included the ability to communicate, integrity, honesty, and self-awareness, in addition to treating others as you would like to be treated. Respect was also described as being earned through experience, service, knowledge and merit. In contrast, the organizational definition of respect does not include merit. This study investigated perceptions of respect within the RCMP, however the findings have broader implications for law enforcement, where there is a growing disconnect between the public, service providers and their organizations. At a policy level, hiring, training and managing of law enforcement human resources may have a direct influence on the attitudes, perceptions and interpersonal interactions of their employees. When there is an incongruity between core values and perceptions of respect, there exists a possible point of conflict and dissatisfaction between the service providers and the recipients of their services. The findings of this study can be applied in the development of an educational approach that acknowledges multiple definitions of respect and introduces a way of bridging the difference between organizational expectations, and the individual perception of respect.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Carolyn Mamchur
Department: 
Education: Faculty of Education
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) Ed.D.

Multilingual Learners: Student Experiences in a First-Year Academic Literacy Class

Author: 
Date created: 
2016-07-20
Abstract: 

This thesis explores how multilingual students might negotiate their multilingual identities while navigating a first-year academic literacy class (ALC). Through an ethnographic approach, with qualitative data including interviews and samples of students’ writing (both formal and informal), I analyze how multilingual students in the ALC might conceptualize their multilingualism and as tied to this, how they then might integrate multilingual practices into their learning and writing processes. While students’ conceptualizations and presentations of their multilingual identities varied, the multilingual students of this study demonstrated how their linguistic perceptions and practices were reflective of and sometimes constrained by dominant linguistic discourses about English and multilingualism.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Steve Marshall
Department: 
Education: Faculty of Education
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.

Dramatherapy and Students with Learning Disabilities

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1992
Abstract: 

For students with learning disabilities, the school may represent a place of failure and frustration. It is a place where the student often receives assistance for failure in the academic domain. These students may encounter difficulties in the social and emotional spheres but appropriate therapeutic measures are not readily available. The dysfunctional aspect of education is that while _it attends to academic needs, it often ignores the social and emotional difficulties that may perpetuate or exacerbate the inherent disability.

This study analyzed the function and identified the therapeutic benefits of psychodramatic techniques with regard to the social and emotional needs of students with learning disabilities.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Leone M. Prock
Department: 
Education: Faculty of Education
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.