Education - Theses, Dissertations, and other Required Graduate Degree Essays

Receive updates for this collection

Skwxwú7mesh Nách’en: Xwech’shí7 tlʼa Nexwníneẁ iy Sneẁíyelh Squamish Praxis the interspace of Upbringing and the Teachings

Date created: 
2016-11-30
Abstract: 

In Canada, First Nations languages are in a grave state of decline. Skwxwú7mesh (Squamish) is a critically endangered language. In Circle, a form of knowledge gathering that has been adapted for this research, co-participants take up the two notions of nexwnínew̉ and snew̉íyelh (upbringing and the teachings). The premise in the research is that Skwxwú7mesh people are engaged in a socialization process, which has at the crux an intergenerational pedagogy of Skwxwú7mesh language, culture, and knowledge re-generation enculturated through family relations in formal and informal ways manifest in their nexwnínew̉ and snew̉íyelh. Based upon the cultural practice Utsám̉ Chiỷáxw (Called to Witness) protocol co-participants become the Witnesses called to “put words to the floor”. This study uses an emergent Skwxwú7mesh theory called Nch’u7mút (united as one) that privileges the Swa7ám̉ (Ancestors) epistemological and ontological knowledge systems. Four principles wanáxw̉s (respect), smenálhwit (dignity), áyatway (kindness), and chénchenstwaywit (support for one another) shape the theory. Xay Sts’its’áp’ (Sacred Work) is a Skwxwú7mesh chiỷáxw (protocol) that frames this dissertation. I use the term Work italicized and capitalized to symbolize respect for the ceremony of research. The findings offer the reader, the co-participant’s critical insights into the Skwxwú7mesh moral universe and the connection of language to land.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Carolyn Mamchur
Graham Smith
Department: 
Education: Faculty of Education
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) Ed.D.

Bridging Lives: Storytelling towards Agency, Advocacy and Change

Date created: 
2016-12-06
Abstract: 

In this thesis, I look at storytelling as it relates to the ability to bridge understanding with others and how it fosters advocacy, agency and change. In 2013, I was the videographer/photographer to a New Westminster community initiative. Based on this experience of witnessing story and its effect on a community, I was inspired to explore social change and personal agency within storytelling. With the use of Narrative Portraiture as my writing method, the thesis follows six-storytelling journeys through the challenges of immigrating to a new land. While in the midst of witnessing these storied journeys with other community participants, I started to recognize a transformation in the community as well as myself. This storytelling project became one component of a Welcoming and Inclusive New Westminster(WINS) initiative that explored a participatory action research(PAR) method as its knowledge acquisition. PAR utilizes a dialogical, recursive, reflective, and iterative approach to achieve change within practices whether individually or globally. Using the two different methodological approaches the reader will witness the journeys as experienced by others, amidst evolving social and personal changes.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Dr. Vicki Kelly
Dr. Michael Ling
Department: 
Education: Faculty of Education
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.

Divided Loyalties: Induction to Changing Expectations The Perceptions of a Group of Recently Appointed University Faculty about the Expectations for Teaching and Research in the Performance of their Professorial Roles.

Date created: 
2016-09-12
Abstract: 

University professors are under growing pressures to perform multiple roles with excellence. The changing landscape of education in the 21st century increasingly calls for professors to excel in both the craft of teaching and research scholarship in their fields of scholarship. In their core vision and purpose statements research universities are recommitting to achieving excellence in student engagement in learning by promoting scholarship and performance in teaching and by developing in-service education programs to assist faculty in meeting these expectations. However, how do faculty view the increasing commitments to excellence in instruction?This study reports on the perceptions of a group of faculty recently appointed to positions in a large research university regarding their understandings of the roles and expectations associated with their new positions. Findings were derived from in-depth semi-structured interviews with nine full-time faculty members at a public university in Western Canada. All interview participants had been hired within five years of the study’s commencement in the summer of 2013. Faculty perceptions of expectations and responsibilities for instruction, research, and service, were contrasted with their lived experiences of induction processes, institutional support, and the relative priorities seen as being attached to performance in research and teaching roles.Participating faculty reported a variety of experiences in their orientations and inductions by the university and their respective departments as new appointees. Participants described perceiving a sense of competing priorities between the pursuit of research in their disciplines and the demands of teaching. They also expressed beliefs that research activities are given greater weight than teaching performance in assessments for contract renewal, tenure, and promotion. Faculty hired specifically as Lecturers, without the expectation of developing research careers, expressed greater clarity regarding role expectations, although some still wished to conduct research as an optional extension to their job descriptions. The study offers suggestions for improvements to university induction practices and suggests that while induction and orientation are often focused on the early stages of an appointment to a new position, there is a need for on-going professional development directed both at teaching and research roles throughout the careers of university professors.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Milton McClaren
Department: 
Education: Faculty of Education
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) Ed.D.

Mentoring strategies in a project-based learning environment: A focus on self-regulation

Date created: 
2016-11-21
Abstract: 

The main purpose of this Action Research investigation was to better understand how post-secondary faculty mentor self-regulatory behaviours in a project-based learning environment (PjBL). The secondary purpose was to understand how the Action Research process supported faculty in their mentoring. Lastly, understanding learner perceptions of being mentored and how the faculty’s mentoring of specific self-regulatory behaviors would align with the expectations of the video game industry, would provide a cross-section of intrigue into the investigation. The research context was the Master of Digital Media Program in Vancouver, Canada. The MDM Program specializes in providing learners, organized in project teams, the opportunity to work on real-world digital media projects. Three faculty mentors and three student teams participated in this study; each team was tasked with co-constructing video-game prototypes for three game companies over a four-month period. Pre-research interviews with established members of the video game industry in Vancouver were conducted in order to determine what qualities and skills they looked for when hiring new recruits. Data from these interviews revealed characteristics of self-regulation, such as self-motivation, ‘ownership’, the ability for recruits to manage their own learning, and self-reliance as being of primary importance. A pilot study was then undertaken to operationalize self-regulation as reflected in the mentoring practices of one MDM faculty member and assess the effectiveness of the planned data collection procedures. The primary investigation consisted of video recording the mentoring sessions of three faculty and three student teams, a total of 18 students. Video recorded mentoring sessions were observed and discussed by the researcher and each faculty member in a one-on-one interview setting. Final faculty and student interviews were conducted. Data from pre-research interviews, the stimulated recall sessions, and final interviews were analyzed and triangulated. Triangulation of learner interviews revealed that mentors supported self-regulatory behaviors using a variety of strategies, which are described in detail. Triangulation of pre-research interviews revealed that mentors were supporting learners in their development of specific characteristics expected of new recruits transitioning into the video game industry.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Cheryl Amundsen
Department: 
Education: Faculty of Education
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) Ph.D.

Patterns of association in older adult gamers: Demographics, gameplay patterns, and perceived benefits

Author: 
Date created: 
2016-07-26
Abstract: 

The over-sixty population is the fastest growing age group worldwide. This rapid growth in the older-adult population requires the need for additional resources to mitigate the effects of aging. Leisure activities have been shown to provide informal learning opportunities that help with various aspects of social and cognitive wellbeing in older adults. A survey asking about gameplay patterns, demographics, and perceived benefits of playing digital games was administered to 590 older adults over the age of 55. Descriptive statistics and non-parametric comparison of means were used to identify associations between variables to find which demographic and gameplay characteristics impacted perceptions of socio-emotional and cognitive benefits. Both perceived socio-emotional and cognitive benefits were associated with a large number of gameplay characteristics, such as time spent playing digital games, people with whom they play digital games, and playing games online. Results provide us with a more nuanced understanding of how older adults play digital games and which factors influence their perceptions of benefits.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
David Kaufman
Shawn Bullock
Department: 
Education: Faculty of Education
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.

From Brynania to Business: Designing an Evidence-Based Business Education Simulation From an Exploration of a Real-Time Blended Model.

Author: 
Date created: 
2016-09-13
Abstract: 

This study provided an opportunity to look across disciplines and beyond regular roleplaying and standard digital-environment-based business games to explore a long-running and unique blended simulation in a different yet related field. The lessons learned from the “anywhere anytime” blended simulation design of the Peace Building Simulation (PBSim) used with undergraduates in Political Science at McGill University in Montreal, Canada provided guidance for the design of a similar simulation for use in undergraduate business management and leadership courses. The results collected through surveys, focus groups, interviews and field observations conducted in 2015 during an exploration of the weeklong simulation suggest that students were highly engaged and productive with this blended format. Interestingly, the participants anticipated they would be both highly engaged and highly stressed during the experience, and those expectations were realized. A learning community was created during the week with the high level of instructor involvement and modelling positively influencing the outcomes. Some gender differences were also found in expectations and engagement. Nine design elements were developed from the results of the study of the PBSim and a review of relevant research. The elements are proposed as useful for the development of a simulation intended to immerse students in a complex business environment.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Milton Maclaren
Department: 
Education: Faculty of Education
Thesis type: 
(Dissertation) Ed.D.

Real-World Applications in Math Class

Date created: 
2016-10-18
Abstract: 

Calls to connect school mathematics to applications in the real-world are ubiquitous. I examine the experience of senior high school students as they encounter a student-centred real-world application task applying logarithms and exponential functions in a murder mystery context. I observed students through the task, analyzed their written solutions, and administered a follow-up questionnaire. Four case studies illustrate the range and nuanced experiences of students completing the real-world task. During the real-world task students experienced prolonged motivation, they made sense of abstract mathematics through the context of the task, and they benefited from group interactions. This empirical study provides support for the claimed benefits from the literature for the inclusion of real-world applications in the teaching and learning of secondary mathematics.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Peter Liljedahl
Department: 
Education: Faculty of Education
Thesis type: 
(Thesis (Education) ) M.Sc.

Language ‘as’ Element: The Sentient Registers of Communicative Practice

Date created: 
2016-11-16
Abstract: 

Facing the challenges to elementary and secondary education in the 21st century requires teachers as well as students, support staff, parents, administrators, academics, and the broader community to confront deeply held assumptions. To address these challenges, schools need to be places where meaningful and sustaining conversations unfold. How we speak to one another becomes my entry point into this societal endeavour we call ‘education’. In this investigation I set out to form a language-based epistemic lens through which future research can study how communicative practices aid or impede educational processes. This investigation draws on philosophy of language and phenomenology. In particular, I look at the ideas of J.L. Austin, Ludwig Wittgenstein and Maurice Merleau- Ponty. The main body of this work is divided into three parts. Part one problematizes the concept of language in order to flesh out its life, to see language qua language in the making. Part two is an extended discussion of Austin’s How To Do Things With Words, Wittgenstein’s Philosophical Investigations and Merleau-Ponty’s The Visible and the Invisible that scaffolds an understanding of language as an animating force behind what we call ‘life’ and ‘reality’. Part three is a set of expressions of the ideas about the elementality of language developed in this dissertation: first as an exploration of subjective registers of language; second as a fictional dialogue representing my own cognitive shifts in this doctoral dissertation; and third as a reflection on the implications of language sensitivity on education. Together these parts demonstrate that living language is not so much a concept as an action, a human activity in the confirmation of what is real, what is meaningful, what is life itself. The findings of this dissertation do not bring closure to the subject of language but rather bring into the open the subject itself, that it is in the possibilities that the ground of our beliefs is formed.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Stephen Smith
Department: 
Education: Faculty of Education
Thesis type: 
(Dissertation) Ph.D.

Teaching teachers: A look inside professional development

Date created: 
2016-12-01
Abstract: 

Extensive research has been conducted on student learning, and pre-service teacher learning inside the classroom, but this is not the case with in-service teachers engaged in learning opportunities provided by professional development.In this study a framework was developed to analyze and provide a description of a professional development session as it occurred. The researcher makes use of the phenomenological perspective, to analyze the ‘lived experience’ of professional development sessions and describe teachers’ reactions to a variety of approaches and activities. As a result of her analysis of professional development sessions, the researcher brings forward some important elements to consider like mood, motives, wants, and who is carrying the flow of the conversation (flux) during the sessions. The researcher also focused on engagement, and how, through engagement, teachers show their motivation, wants, moods, needs and learning. To represent the phenomenology of professional development in a way that was succinct and useful, the researcher developed the idea of scenarios for her analysis. A scenario is defined as a unit of exchange, where the professional developer has a plan, and in accordance with it, s/he introduces or presents an idea or task. This action is taken in by the teachers, and the teachers then respond. Communication is not perfect, the original idea passes through the teachers’ ‘wants-motives-mood’ filter, so what the teachers take out of what the professional developer presents to them is not necessarily what the professional developer expects, given that the response the professional developer receives also passes through her/his ‘wants-motives-mood’ filter. The unit is completed when the professional developer takes in the response and sees a need to re-direct. By dividing activities into scenarios, and then focusing on each of its components, the analysis was considerably simplified. The researcher was able to find units of meaning, and significant themes emerged from the analysis: how teachers use the teacher guides, how previous practice can play a role for change, and how a teacher’s resistance can interfere with the learning of others.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Peter Liljedahl
Department: 
Education: Faculty of Education
Thesis type: 
(Dissertation) Ph.D.

Learning experiences during postgraduate studies in the sciences: Exploring variations and outcomes

Author: 
Date created: 
2016-10-05
Abstract: 

This dissertation documents a range and variation of postgraduate science students’ experiences in terms of degree experiences and post-graduation outcomes from a Workplace Learning perspective. Study one is a narrative study of six Canadian science doctoral students over two and a half years. Narrative analysis of data, including logs and interviews, identified three case-pairs related to overall affordances/supports received and anticipated career outcomes. They were termed: positive-professional, positive-academic, and challenging-uncertain. Three affordances of interest were also identified across the cases: research projects, supervision, and colleagues. Variations in affordances and their relationship to the case-pairings were explored. Study two is a mixed-methods study of the experiences of nine Canadian science doctoral students at two institutions over four years. Narrative analysis of data including logs and interviews resulted in three case-groupings related to career outcomes/outlooks: positive outcome, positive outlook, and uncertain outlook. Quantitative analysis of the logs identified three metrics which related to these outcomes/outlooks: number of publications per year, percentage of logs reporting research difficulties, and percentage of times supervisory help was received when needed. The relationship between these metrics and the case-groupings were then explored thematically. Study three is a primarily quantitative study that examines the experiences of thirty-six masters and doctoral students across the UK. The data were comprised of surveys and follow-up interviews. Principal components analysis and Spearman correlations were used to analyse the surveys. This analysis resulted in multiple factors, including two project descriptions based on the subject of study: social-case and cognitive-physiological. In turn, each related to a pattern of research practices (e.g., quantitative, qualitative) and affordances (teamwork, supervision, mentorship) more typically described for the social sciences and the sciences, respectively, as opposed to one broad set of practices and affordances across the discipline as has been more commonly described. Interviews were used to contextualise these findings.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Cheryl Amundsen
Department: 
Education: Faculty of Education
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) Ph.D.