Education - Theses, Dissertations, and other Required Graduate Degree Essays

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Epistemology, cybernetics and uncertainty : philosophical observations on the work of Warren McCulloch and John Dewey

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1968
Abstract: 

This thesis considers the application of information theory concepts to the problems of epistemology. It attempts to demonstrate that such formalistic concepts by nature must neglect the fundamentally behavioral aspects of thinking, Part I attempts to describe a predicament which is widely felt today, that of man's inability to control a world of his own making. It is then proposed that a comprehensive theory of human behavior is what is required to deal with the predicament. Part II compares the theory of "Experimental Epistemology" of Warren 5. McCulloch with the theory of "Inquiry" of John Dewey. Basically McCulloch's equation of sense data with information and his acceptance of negative feedback as explanatory of purposeful behavior is attacked. Further his assumption of Cartesian Dualism and attempts to resolve it through reductionism are considered in detail. Dewey's theory of "Inquiry" is proposed as a suitable alternative to explain how we gain warrantable assertibility as the foundation for our judgments of practice. His rejection IV of any general theory of reality and insistence upon the social cultural and behavioral aspects of thinking are noted. Part III considers the educational implications of both theories, by analyzing the kinds of choice they deal with and the consequent kinds of control they proffer. Educiational ends are proposed which recognize the human organism as a dynamic process, and requirements for means to such ends are stipulated

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Frederick J. Brown
Department: 
Education: Behavioral Science Foundations
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.Ed.

A visual-motor test and a perceptual-reasoning test as discriminators of academic achievement.

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1968
Abstract: 

This study was designed to explore Che effects of visual perceptual abilities as determinants of school achievement and to provide some information about two tests in this area. Other aspects of achievement were also examined. The Bender Gestalt Test and the Raven Progressive Matrices (1947) were administered to two hundred and fifty-six children in kindergarten, grade one and grade two. One hundred and twenty-two children were classified as low achievers and one hundred and thirty-four as average achievers. .The effects of achievement level, grade level, age within grade, and sex, upon the children's visual perceptual performance scores were studied. The two achievement groups were examined to note similarities or differences in the children's date of birth, age within grade and sex. The results indicate that both the Bender Gestalt Test and the Raven Progressive Matrices discriminate significantly between children in the three grade levels and between children in the two achievement levels. Neither test significantly discriminated between male,and female or between young and old within the grades. Birthdate (May to August) did not relate significantly to achievement. Birthdate (September to January) did relate significantly to achievement as did age within grade. The sex of the children was also found to be significantly related to achievement' level. These results were discussed and implications for further research in the area of predictive visual perceptual screening devices were advanced. Implications for the study of the effects of sex, birthdate and age within grade on school achievement were also discussed.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
R.J.C. Harper
Department: 
Education: Behavioral Sciences
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.Ed.