Education - Theses, Dissertations, and other Required Graduate Degree Essays

Receive updates for this collection

Creating space for authentic voice in Canada's screen industry: A case study of 'Women In the Director's Chair (WIDC)'

Author: 
Date created: 
2019-01-25
Abstract: 

Using an appreciative inquiry approach and sharing a reflexive 4-D (i.e., discovery, dreams, design, delivery / destiny) narrative that explores societal, organizational and personal perspectives, this action research study describes a specially designed, internationally respected Canadian national professional development initiative for women screen directors, entitled ‘Women In the Director’s Chair (WIDC)’. The narrative traces how this initiative came to be, and within the context of North America’s ‘waves’ of feminism, where it is placed on the landscape of Canada’s screen industry. While foregrounding a well-documented socio-cultural ‘lack of confidence’ in women leaders and in particular in women screen directors in Canada, the study contextualizes the personal ‘leadership experience’ narratives of WIDC director participants while the author makes meaning of her own leadership journey as a co-creator of the WIDC initiative. The author further explores the twenty-two-year evolution of WIDC’s transformation-oriented pedagogical design as she reflects on the positive core of WIDC and asks, ‘What is WIDC? What was learned and what’s next?’ Sharing leadership metaphors that offer guidance for navigating a ‘continuum of confidence’ and offering a theoretical map towards transformation for individual women as well as feminist or like-minded organizations, the study concludes with a call to action to adopt an appreciative growth-minded stance in order to create space for authentic voices to thrive in Canada’s screen industry, in particular the voices of female leaders.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Carolyn Mamchur
Department: 
Education: Faculty of Education
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) Ed.D.

Designing eBooks to facilitate mathematical dialogue during shared reading

Author: 
Date created: 
2019-01-15
Abstract: 

This research aimed to investigate the impact of variation in eBook design, specifically hotspots, on caregiver-preschooler dyads’ communications about mathematics story content during shared reading. Two eBooks were designed and compared. Hotspots in the math eBook guided joint attention to mathematically-related activated features; hotspots in the emotion-action eBook guided joint attention to emotions and actions of the characters. The hotspots were matched in number and type across both eBooks. The narrative and illustrations remained consistent between the two eBooks. The dyads’ interaction with different types of hotspots; and their use of spoken utterances and gestures were compared across the two conditions. Thirty-two dyads participated in this study; 16 in each group. Findings showed that, in both groups, all caregivers and children used spoken utterances and gestures, albeit to different extent, to express the mathematics content in the narrative. However, spoken utterances and gestures that aligned with mathematics occurred more frequently among dyads in the math condition compared to the other condition. Further, caregivers in the math condition responded to hotspots by asking high-level cognitive questions, and both caregivers and children in this condition reacted mostly by repeating what was heard. In the emotion-action condition, dyads reacted emotively to the hotspots. Findings also showed that dyads in the math condition – as opposed to their peers - tended to discuss the embedded mathematics activities. Thematic analysis was done to explore in more depth the interplay between the acting on the hotspot and the narrative concerning the communication about mathematics as the dyads discussed two activities embedded in the story. Three themes emerged regarding scaffolding of mathematical ideas, co-construction of ideas, as well as seeking self-discovery and agency of the child. Findings from the Caregiver Satisfaction Questionnaire showed differences across conditions in regards to the children’s attention; and similarities in perceptions of the children’s enjoyment and willingness to share eBooks in the future. Findings from this research raise implications for the future designs of eBooks; particularly regarding the content and placement of the hotspots.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Phil Winne
Department: 
Education: Faculty of Education
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) Ph.D.

Relationship between mindful teaching methods and student perception of their retention of mathematical knowledge

Author: 
Date created: 
2018-12-19
Abstract: 

Although little research has been done on what students perceive increases their retention of mathematical content, studies show that how a memory is acquired has a direct impact on how strong that memory is. By increasing student engagement through the use of teaching tools found in Liljedahl’s thinking classroom, along with digital technology, an increase in student retention in a mathematics classroom could occur. This research study focuses on if there is a relationship between students’ perception of their retention of mathematical knowledge and the use of engaging teaching methods such as vertical, non-permanent surfaces, visibly random groupings, mindful notes, and digital technology. Results were gathered through student surveys and interviews, although staggered assessments were also analyzed to see if variance in results occurred with the implementation of new teaching methods. Results showed that the implementation of engaging teaching methods have a positive impact on students’ perception of their retention of mathematical content.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Peter Liljedahl
Sean Chorney
Department: 
Education: Faculty of Education
Thesis type: 
(Thesis (Education)) M.Sc.

Reading to learn mathematics: Textbooks, student notes and classroom communication

Author: 
Date created: 
2018-12-17
Abstract: 

‘Reading to learn mathematics’ has diverse interpretations: from reading to decoding text to reading mathematical literature. This blind study examined the impact of enhanced reading of the mathematics textbook in a Pre-Calculus 11 classroom. Students read and made personal notes on new content before there was any discussion or direct instruction. Their work was collected and examined for aspects and features of the mathematical text noted and whether work was directly copied or uniquely created. Prompts such as, ‘Create notes for a friend who missed class’ were used. The voice of their written work was compared to the voice of the textbook. Results indicated it was not the correctness of explanations or interpretations that mattered, rather the personal involvement with text that allowed for understanding. Further, students demonstrated increased ‘why’ questions, a broader use of mathematical register during class discussion, and changes to their personal connection to their learning.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Peter Liljedahl
David John Pimm
Department: 
Education: Faculty of Education
Thesis type: 
(Thesis (Education)) M.Sc.

Survival mode: Mothers’ perceptions of implementing physician’s recommendations for paediatric sleep-care

Author: 
Date created: 
2018-12-14
Abstract: 

Paediatric sleep problems are pervasive and affect optimal development. Although evidence-based treatments are available, clinical experience suggests that they are not effectively translated into practice. The experience of the clinicians at the Sleep-/Wake Behaviour Clinic at Sunny Hill Children’s Health Centre (BC Children’s Hospital) suggested that well-validated treatment protocols were not translating into clinical successes with their patients. A preliminary study in Kamloops showed that families were not implementing physicians’ recommendations for sleep-care, which raised questions about was preventing them from doing so. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to understand a) mother’s experience managing their child’s sleep problem in the context of the BC healthcare system and family; and, b) describe the meanings they make from these experiences, and in turn, how these inform mothers’ reactions to physician’s sleep-care recommendations. Mothers seeking sleep-care support from the Kamloops Paediatric Sleep Clinic were interviewed about their experiences implementing recommendations and the barriers they faced. Through an iterative process of theoretical sampling, memoing, and on-going review of the literature, I constructed a theoretical process model of mothers’ experience managing their child’s sleep problem entitled “Surival Mode.” This nascent theory was validated through negative case analysis, flip-flop techniques and member-checking, until I was satisfied that it “fit” and was a “useful” model from the participants’ perspective. Understanding the meaning of sleep problems for mothers, and the factors underlying adherence with sleep recommendations, may help increase intervention success and, inform policy/program development.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Lucy LeMare
Sharalyn Jordan
Department: 
Education: Faculty of Education
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.

Learning and its discontents: Three theories of study and the figure of the studier

Author: 
Date created: 
2018-12-14
Abstract: 

This thesis discusses alternatives to educational discourses that promote educational growth, self-actualization and the accumulation of knowledge that is observable and measurable. These learning discourses are evident in talking about the people we teach as learners, to schools as places of learning, to teachers as facilitators and to the curriculum as learning outcomes. The logic of learning has permeated educational discourses and placed emphasis on treating education as the means for students to develop skills in order to compete in the global market, which has led to impoverished perspectives on both education and the people we teach. In this thesis, I will argue that it is necessary to re-think the learning discourses and to discuss alternative educational experiences. I will refer to this kind of educational experience as study that unfolds without predetermined outcomes. It is necessary to make space and time for study in education because study is an educational experience that needs to be supported for its own sake. First, I will describe study as the experience of the human subject’s (im)potentiality whose function is to suspend the neoliberal logic in education that insists on the actualization of one’s potential in the name of generating more capital. Second, I will argue that the literature on study in education so far has not properly acknowledged study as a form of practice. So I will highlight another function of study as a practice of thinking. Next, I will develop a new theory of study as an educational experience that can shift the way we perceive the world and open new possibilities for being in the world. I will conclude this chapter with a call for a ‘new universality’ in education that acknowledges study as a legitimate form of education rather than as a waste of time and potential. Finally, I will discuss what can be done under the assumption that the people we teach are neither learners nor students but are rather studiers. Studiers are the human subjects of education who resist any classification and suspend the notion that we are willful human subjects always oriented towards action and the production of speech.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Charles Bingham
Roumiana Ilieva
Department: 
Education: Faculty of Education
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) Ph.D.

What's the harm? Examining the stereotyping of Indigenous Peoples in health systems

Author: 
Date created: 
2018-12-03
Abstract: 

This research study examined how stereotyping of Indigenous Peoples impacts health service provider attitudes, actions and services to Indigenous Peoples. This was done by assessing incidents posted by health service provider participants in the BC Provincial Health Services Authority (PHSA), San’yas Indigenous Cultural Safety (ICS) program. The data were coded and analyzed for the frequency of specific stereotypes, attitudes, type of harm, and sites of harm. Anonymous demographic identifiers selected by health service providers were also analyzed as secondary data to provide information regarding the standpoint and perspective of participants observing the harms in health services. These data provide a better understanding of stereotype harm and Indigenous-specific racism in Health Systems on both an organizational and individual level. This study may also assist system design and service delivery to become safer for Indigenous Peoples and to address unparalleled inequities between Settler Canadians and Indigenous Peoples. The intent was to assist Settler service providers to understand how unexamined stereotypes can seriously harm Indigenous Peoples. I conducted qualitative research followed up with quantifying the results. This method of study of the incidents provided by participants produced data to examine and better understand the frequency, impact, and context of Indigenous-specific stereotyping incidents.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
David Kaufman
Department: 
Education: Faculty of Education
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) Ed.D.

Teaching about race and racism in the classroom: Managing the Indigenous elephant in the room

Author: 
Date created: 
2018-11-01
Abstract: 

In order to gain an understanding of the knowledge, self-awareness, and skills that educators require to successfully manage Indigenous-specific racism, I interviewed 10 educators and followed this with a focus group. I employed qualitative methods to determine what happens when anti-Indigenous racism is taken up by educators? What are the characteristics of anti-Indigenous racism that makes it challenging to manage in a classroom? And what are the strategies that seem to be successful as well as those that are not? The participants in the study self-identified as Indigenous (4), as White (3), and as racialized (3). Drawing on the findings, I conclude by outlining recommendations for educators addressing anti-Indigenous racism. This thesis is an exploration of the way in which anti-Indigenous racism manifests in adult education classrooms. The findings from this thesis support the literature that exposes the high level of violence related to anti-Indigenous racism in education environments. Findings revealed that taking up anti-Indigenous racism in ways that are effective requires high levels of knowledge, self-awareness, and the skills to address the accompanying violence and racist ideology that supports it. Other key themes from the findings include the challenges of addressing resistance, and the traumatic impact of anti-Indigenous violence on educators, particularly those who are Indigenous. The racial standpoint and identity of the educator emerged as a significant factor and can inform the ways in which anti-Indigenous racism is negotiated in the classroom. Educators also identified strategies they use to manage and confront anti-Indigenous attitudes and behaviour providing examples of those that were successful as well as those that were not. Anti-Indigenous racism is not new and what it is clear from this research is that in order to disrupt the unacceptable levels of anti-Indigenous attitudes and behaviours in the classroom, educators will need to equip themselves with an enhanced inventory of strategies in order to participate in meaningful change. This study will contribute to the growing body of work that critically addresses the pedagogy used to confront the way in which colonial history continues to manifest in the education system.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Dolores van der Wey
Department: 
Education: Faculty of Education
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) Ed.D.

Now(here): Exploring the experiences of displacement and relocation of the 1.5 Generation Colombian refugees living in the Lower Mainland through narrative inquiry

Author: 
Date created: 
2018-11-22
Abstract: 

The experiences of displacement not only entail fleeing a threat against one's life; it means re-writing one’s story in a new location and often in a new language and a new culture. The journey of the refugees also includes coming to terms with one’s own refugeeness as an identity and making meaning of experiences of displacement and relocation. The purpose of this study is to answer the question: “How do Colombian refugees who belong to the 1.5 generation living in the Lower Mainland make meaning of their experiences of displacement and relocation?” Narrative inquiry in combination with art-based elicitation was the primary method used. Findings from this study will be relevant for counsellors and social service providers who work with this population. The opportunity to have a better understanding of the challenges that 1.5 generation refugees will offer information to design meaningful support strategies for both clients and mental health service providers.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Sharalyn Jordan
Masahiro Minami
Department: 
Education: Faculty of Education
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) M.A.

The work of art making

Author: 
Date created: 
2018-10-31
Abstract: 

This research examines the relationship of art making to the universal energy and aliveness of the natural world and asserts that the West has overlooked this connection. The research depicts the art making process as a flow of resources between the physical and invisible dimensions of the universe as the artistic form takes shape, awakening the individual to an interconnected world and our reciprocal need to nurture nature’s well-being as our own. Indigenous and East Asian cultures understood these connections between art making and the larger universe and the limits within which the natural world and all its inhabitants could flourish. Understanding the art making process through this lens presents an alternate perspective for how we know the world in which we live, how we understand the art making process within our world and, subsequently, how we might think about environmental education within this integrated context. Long before the over reliance on Western science and the rational mind created the current imbalance in our relationship with the natural world, the human / more than human communities worked together to maintain the uninterrupted flow of this energetic dimension. The concept of systems thinking provides a Western understanding for the interconnectedness of the holistic perspective. As we explore the role of art making in both the Native American and traditional East Asian literature, we get a sense of where art making belongs within a holistic perspective and its ties to the health and well-being of the universe and its inhabitants. The takeaway is that the practice of art making can be a catalyst for understanding sustainable patterns of behavior that nurture the natural world.

Document type: 
Thesis
File(s): 
Senior supervisor: 
Allan Mackinnon
Department: 
Education: Faculty of Education
Thesis type: 
(Thesis) Ph.D.