Simon Fraser University Library

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Let's Talk About Faculty Outreach and Engagement: Successes, Lessons Learned, & Strategies

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2020-04-30
Abstract: 

Are you a scholarly communications expert looking to foster deeper engagement with your faculty colleagues on topics like open access, scholarly publishing, copyright, or knowledge mobilization? Do you find yourself constantly reimagining your workshops, speaker series, and promotional material, hoping that this time you've crafted a resonant message that will motivate researchers at your institution to take action? Join us for a facilitated discussion about faculty outreach and engagement. We'll start the conversation by sharing some examples of our events, programming, and communications campaigns: things we’ve tried that failed; things we’ve tried that worked; and some reflections on what success looks like at our institution. Then we'll turn things over to you, surfacing your experiences and perspectives on faculty engagement. We hope to pool the expertise in the room and share some strategies we can all take back to our institutions.

Document type: 
Conference presentation

SFU Open Access Policy Report 2020

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2020-03
Document type: 
Report
File(s): 

Course Journals Supporting Social Justice: Developing Equitable Scholarly Communications Through In-class Publishing Projects

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2019-11-22
Abstract: 

How can OJS and OMP be used in classes to engage students in discussions around social justice in scholarly publishing? This presentation will discuss examples of course journals and book projects at Simon Fraser University (SFU) and Kwantlen Polytechnic University (KPU) which attempt to involve students in anti-colonial, anti-racist, and anti-oppressive forms of scholarship. These projects aim to be inclusive in a variety of ways: in terms of accessibility, language, content formats, and sustainability strategies. The presenters discuss the ways that OJS and OMP can be used in the classroom to develop students’ awareness of, and ability to address, social justice concerns in traditional publishing. Finally, they will explore how lessons learned from these case studies can be implemented in other courses.

Document type: 
Conference presentation

Course Journals: Leveraging Library Publishing to Engage Students at the Intersection of Open Pedagogy, Scholarly Communications, and Information Literacy

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2019-11-14
Abstract: 

This article presents a case study for developing course journals, an approach to student writing and publishing that involves students in the production of an online, open access journal within a structured classroom environment. Simon Fraser University (SFU) Library’s Digital Publishing program has partnered with instructors in four different departments across the university to implement course journals in their classrooms using Open Journal Systems. Two models of course journals have emerged, both of which offer valuable learning opportunities for students around scholarly communications, information literacy, and open pedagogy. In Model 1, students act as both authors who write and submit their work for publication in the course journal and as reviewers who referee each other’s submitted work. In Model 2, students act as the course journal editors, crafting the course journal’s call for papers, soliciting content, recruiting reviewers, and managing the editorial workflow from submission to publication. This article discusses challenges and opportunities of both models as well as strategies for smooth implementation and collaboration with classroom instructors.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

BC Academic Libraries Section (BCALS) Winter Meeting Panel - 2019

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2019-11-29
Abstract: 

The theme for the BCALS 2019 Winter Meeting is user engagement. Academic library workers’ focus on community engagement and patron-centred services conveys their commitment to service and their interest in remaining conscientious of patron needs and barriers. Join us as we hear from a panel of experienced library and information professionals to explore opportunities for engaging with user communities, seeking and making the best use of user feedback and assessment strategies, and forging partnerships within and beyond the library that can support and enhance the diverse experiences of library users.

The speakers for this year's meeting are Heather O'Brien (Associate Professor, UBC iSchool), Julie Mitchell (Assistant Director, Student Engagement, IKB Learning Centre, UBC), Joyce Wong (Librarian/Coordinator User Experience, Langara College), Ebony Magnus (Head, Belzberg Library, SFU).

Document type: 
Video

Perceptions and Experiences of Precarious Employment in Canadian Libraries: An Exploratory Study

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2019-09-23
Abstract: 

Precarious employment is a labour practice characterized for employers by flexibility and economic efficiencies and for workers by vulnerability and uncertainty as to job duration, scheduling, and pay. It is increasingly common in Canada and can result in physical, mental, financial, and social strain for people who experience it. In libraries, it has the potential for negative effects on individual staff members, organizational health, and service quality. However, literature on precarious library work is scarce, and it is unclear how its effects on library staff compare to those described in the broader literature or how it affects the library field as a whole.

The purpose of this study was to gather information about library workers’ perceptions and experiences of precarious employment and to see how it played out in library contexts. Thirteen library workers both with and without experiences of precarious employment participated in qualitative, semi-structured interviews, which were synthesized into a narrative summarizing their thoughts and experiences. Results indicated that while there were some positive effects of precarious work, they mainly benefited library organizations from scheduling and financial standpoints, while negative outcomes were more numerous, more salient, and affected individuals as well as organizations. Awareness of such perceptions and experiences may help to spark conversations and support for those experiencing negative effects from precarious work, and it can serve to reduce or eliminate factors leading to those effects. However, failure to address them may result in negative outcomes for library workers and organizations, such as stress, turnover, marginalization, burnout, leaving the field, reduced service quality, and more. Accordingly, this paper provides some of the first qualitative information on precarious employment in libraries and may be used to support broader discussions about the topic.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Let's Talk Precarity (Or Not): Libraries, Community, and Conversation

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2019-06-04
Abstract: 

Precarious labour structures such as contracts and on-call work are increasingly common in both academia and librarianship. Recent reports from the Canadian Association of University Teachers and the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives have measured the extent and impact of contract employment in academia. They indicate that individuals working precariously experience effects such as a sense of disconnection, poor mental and physical health outcomes, financial instability, and high levels of stress and uncertainty. Institutional effects can include declining quality of service, lower workplace morale, and increasing administrative load for managers and continuing staff. While these reports provide valuable data on the working conditions of contract academic staff, both determined librarians to be out of scope despite acknowledging that librarians are often part of faculty associations or bargaining units.

Our ongoing research study on precarity in libraries aims to address this gap in knowledge and provide new information on precarious work in Canadian libraries. Since November 2017, we have been collecting and coding postings from the Partnership Job Board into a dataset that lets us explore patterns in job postings and identify the prevalence of precarious positions. We have also sought to capture the effects and perceptions of precarious work through semi-structured interviews with BC library workers, and we are planning an online survey that will build on findings from these other components.

In this session, we will discuss findings from our job postings dataset with a particular focus on postings in academic libraries, and we will situate this information within the broader contexts of our other findings and of precarity in academia. We will also explore the following questions: How can academic librarians organize and advocate for the concerns of library workers in the context of precarity in higher education? How can we challenge the silence around this topic and make space for conversations about precarity and its effects? How can those with tenure or secure employment support and advocate for precariously employed colleagues? How can we build solidarity with precarious workers, within the library, in our institutions, and with workers across institutions? In doing so, we hope to inform attendees about the negative effects of precarious work and assemble a range of strategies to mitigate them.

Document type: 
Conference presentation

An Active Learning Approach to Teaching Copyright Essentials

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2019-10-10
Document type: 
Book chapter
File(s): 

Preparing To Publish: SFU Library Workshop for Graduate Students

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2019-09-14
Abstract: 

This workshop is presented by SFU Library for graduate students who are interested in publishing their work in academic journals. Graduate students are always encouraged to publish but often without really knowing what that means or how to start. This workshop focuses on navigating the peer review process and also touches on the topics of open access, working with an editor, and co-authorship.  It includes a discussion of copyright transfer agreements and licenses and provides insight into publishing venues for assuring your research has the best possible visibility, accessibility, and impact.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Open Journals in the Classroom: Leveraging the Power of Social Learning through Course-Based, Online, Open Access Journals

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2019-05-23
Abstract: 

Drawing on our recent experiences with implementing and supporting several course journal projects at Simon Fraser University (SFU), this presentation explores opportunities for academic librarians to partner with faculty using open journals in the classroom to facilitate deeper, hands-on learning experiences for students around scholarly communications.

Document type: 
Conference presentation
File(s):