Interactive Arts and Technology, School of (SIAT)

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The School of Interactive Arts and Technology, SIAT, is located at the Surrey campus of SFU. There are two subcollections in SIAT. Please see below.

Sound intensity gradients in an ambient intelligence audio display

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2006
Abstract: 

This paper describes the prototype of a real-time responsive audio display for an ambient intelligent game named socio-ec(h)o. The audio display relies on a gradient response to represent and anticipate player action. We describe the audio display schema, and discuss results of our current experimentation in guiding player actions through types of audio feedback, for creating sound recognition, perceptions of change and sound intensity.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

AmbientSonic map: Towards a new conceptualization of sound design for games

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2006
Abstract: 

This paper presents an overview of the main features of sound design for games, and argues for a new conceptualization of it, beginning with a closer look at the role of sound as feedback for gameplay. The paper then proposes and details a new approach for sound feedback in games, which provides ambient, intensity-based sonic display that not only responds to, but also guides the player towards the solution of the game. A pilot study and leading outcomes from it are presented, in the hopes of laying a foundation for future investigations into this type of sonic feedback.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Framing complexity, design and experience: A reflective analysis

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2005
Abstract: 

The paper discusses theory and practice in the roles of refl ective practice and contextual design in addressing issues of complexity in design. The author defi nes a new understanding of the role of complexity in design. The paper reviews theories in design and HCI related to refl ective practice, context, and embodied interaction. A case story of practice in interaction design and museums is presented as a practicebased investigation of the complex. The paper calls for the framing of larger research agendas in this area with the need to further work on issues of context, refl ective practice, embodiment and human activity in order to provide a more comprehensive and integral view of design activity. The paper concludes with the need to reframe concerns in design in order to emphasise situated participation, non-rational design strategies, in situ design and a re-orientation in focus from tasks to experience.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Exploring the everyday designer

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2005
Abstract: 

This paper discusses our preliminary analysis of how designer and non-designer participants discussed and engaged in design activity. For this research, we employed two design study experiments that included a total of forty-eight participants. In our preliminary findings we found differences between designers and nondesigners in how a design activity is analyzed. The more significant preliminary finding is that there were substantially less differences in how designers and non-designers engaged our design activity.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Ontology-based user modeling in an augmented audio reality system for museums

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2005
Abstract: 

Ubiquitous computing is a challenging area that allows us to further our understanding and techniques of context-aware and adaptive systems. Among the challenges is the general problem of capturing the larger context in interaction from the perspective of user modeling and human–computer interaction (HCI). The imperative to address this issue is great considering the emergence of ubiquitous and mobile computing environments. This paper provides an account of our addressing the specific problem of supporting functionality as well as the experience design issues related to museum visits through user modeling in combination with an audio augmented reality and tangible user interface system. This paper details our deployment and evaluation of ec(h)o – an augmented audio reality system for museums. We explore the possibility of supporting a context-aware adaptive system by linking environment, interaction object and users at an abstract semantic level instead of at the content level. From the user modeling perspective ec(h)o is a knowledge based recommender system. In this paper we present our findings from user testing and how our approach works well with an audio and tangible user interface within a ubiquitous computing system. We conclude by showing where further research is needed.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

An ambient intelligence platform for physical play

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2005
Abstract: 

This paper describes an ambient intelligent prototype known as socio-ec(h)o. socio-ec(h)o explores the design and implementation of a system for sensing and display, user modeling, and interaction models based on a game structure. The game structure includes, word puzzles, levels, body states, goals and game skills. Body states are body movements and positions that players must discover in order to complete a level and in turn represent a learned game skill. The paper provides an overview of background concepts and related research. We describe the prototype and game structure, provide a technical description of the prototype and discuss technical issues related to sensing, reasoning and display. The paper contributes by providing a method for constructing group parameters from individual parameters with real-time motion capture data; and a model for mapping the trajectory of participant’s actions in order to determine an intensity level used to manage the experience flow of the game and its representation in audio and visual display. We conclude with a discussion of known and outstanding technical issues, and future research.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Museum as ecology: A case study analysis of an ambient intelligent museum guide

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2005
Abstract: 

This paper explores the usefulness of the ecology concept as an analytical framework for designing interactive technology in museums. We aim to describe and evaluate an ecological approach to understanding museums and to examine information and cultural ecologies as analytical tools for guiding the design of interactive systems. We focus on two related concepts of ecology, cultural ecology (Bell 2002) and information ecology (Nardi and O'Day 1999). Utilizing each of the two frameworks, we analyze observational and interview data we collected during the research for an ambient intelligent museum guide. We also discuss the design implications of our analysis. In this paper we found that an ecology framework is highly appropriate for representing the complexities of activities, relationships, technologies and people connected to museums. We also found the information.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Rules and ontologies in support of real-time ubiquitous application

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2005
Abstract: 

The focus of this paper is the practical evaluation of the challenges and capabilities of combination of ontologies and rules in the context of realtime ubiquitous application. The ec(h)o project designed a platform to create a museum experience that consists of a physical installation and an interactive virtual layer of three-dimensional soundscapes that are physically mapped to the museum displays. The retrieval mechanism is built on the user model and conceptual descriptions of sound objects and museum artifacts. The rule-based user model was specifically designed to work in environments where the rich semantic descriptions are available. The retrieval criteria are represented as inference rules that combine knowledge from psychoacoustics and cognitive domains with compositional aspects of interaction. Evaluation results both from the laboratory and museum deployment testing are presented together with the end user usability evaluations.We also summarize our findings in the lessons learned that provide a transferable generic knowledge for similar type of applications. The ec(h)o proved that ontologies and rules provide an excellent platform for building a highly-responsive context-aware interactive application.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

A new educational model for interactive product design: The integration project

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2005
Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Socio-ec(h)o: Ambient intelligence and gameplay

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2005
Abstract: 

This paper describes the preliminary research of an ambient intelligent system known as socioec(h)o. socio-ec(h)o explores the design and implementation of an ambient intelligent system for sensing and display, user modeling, and interaction models based on game structures. Our interaction model is based on a game structure including levels, body states, goals and game skills. Body states are the body movements and positions that players must discover in order to complete a level and in turn represent a learned game skill. The paper provides an overview of background concepts and related research. We describe the game structure and prototype of our environment. We discuss games research concepts we utilized and our approach to group user models based on Richard Bartle’s game types. We explain the role of embodied cognition within our design and elaborate on what we chose to encode as embodied actions, cognition and communication. We describe how we utilized selective responses that were real-time, gradient, provided rewards and were unique to different group user models. We introduce our approach to designing ambient intelligent systems that is ecologically inspired. We stress the empirical nature of the design work and the role of participatory design in developing our system.

Document type: 
Article
File(s):