Interactive Arts and Technology, School of (SIAT)

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The School of Interactive Arts and Technology, SIAT, is located at the Surrey campus of SFU. There are two subcollections in SIAT. Please see below.

Understanding aural fluency in auditory display design for ambient intelligent environments

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2008
Abstract: 

This paper presents the design and some evaluation results from the auditory display model of an ambient intelligent game named socio-ec(h)o. socio-ec(h)o is played physically by a team of four, and displays information via a responsive environment of light and sound. Based on a study of 56 participants involving both qualitative and preliminary quantitative analysis, we present our findings to date as they relate to the auditory display model, future directions and implications. Based on our design and evaluation experience we begin building a theoretical understanding for the unique requirements of informative sonic displays in ambient intelligent and ubiquitous computing systems. We develop and discuss the emerging research concept of aural fluency in ambient intelligent settings.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

A report on participatory workshops for the design of adaptive collaborative learning

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2008
Abstract: 

This “work-in-progress” paper discusses the process of conducting participatory workshops during the design of an adaptive, collaborative learning system. We outline our methods for exploring group interaction, collaboration, and learning in an iterative series workshops. We conclude with a discussion of how the results of these workshops have influenced our ongoing work in designing an adaptive system for family groups in the museum.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Exploring ambient sound techniques in the design of responsive environments for children

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2007
Abstract: 

This paper describes the theoretical framework, design, implementation and results from an exploratory informant workshop that examines an alternative approach to sound feedback in the design of responsive environments for children. This workshop offers preliminary directions and models for using intensity-based ambient sound display in the design of interactive learning environments for children that offer assistance in task-oriented activities. We see the value of this research in developing a more cohesive and ecological model for use of audio feedback in the design of embedded interactions for children. The approach presented here takes the design of multi-modal feedback beyond being experiential, to one that supports learning and problem solving.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Situated play in a tangible interface and adaptive audio museum guide

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2007
Abstract: 

This paper explores the design issues of 9 situated play within a museum through the study of a 10 museum guide prototype that integrates a tangible interface, audio display, and adaptive modeling. We discuss our use of design ethnography in order to situate our interaction and to investigate the liminal and engagement qualities of a museum visit. The paper provides an overview of our case study and analysis of our user evaluation. We discuss the implications including degrees of balance in the experience design of play in interaction; the challenge in developing a discovery-based information model, and the need for a better understanding of the contextual aspects of tangible user interfaces (TUIs). We conclude that learning effectiveness and functionality can be balanced productively with playful interaction through an adaptive audio and TUI if designers balance the engagement between play and the environment, and the space between imagination and interpretation that links the audio content to the artifacts.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Investigating sound intensity gradients as feedback for embodied learning

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2007
Abstract: 

This paper explores an intensity-based approach to sound feedback in systems for embodied learning. We describe a theoretical framework, design guidelines, and the implementation of and results from an informant workshop. The specific context of embodied activity is considered in light of the challenges of designing meaningful sound feedback, and a design approach is shown to be a generative way of uncovering significant sound design patterns. The exploratory workshop offers preliminary directions and design guidelines for using intensity-based ambient sound display in interactive learning environments. The value of this research is in its contribution towards the development of a cohesive and ecologically valid model for using audio feedback in systems, which can guide embodied interaction. The approach presented here suggests ways that multi-modal auditory feedback can support interactive collaborative learning and problem solving.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

How informances can be used in design ethnography

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2007
Abstract: 

In this paper we discuss how we’ve adapted the technique of informance design for use in design ethnography. We detail our design ethnography workflow method and describe our informances.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

The resourcefulness of everyday design

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2007
Abstract: 

We discuss our study that looks at family members as everyday designers. We explain the design actions of family members to be creative, as evidenced by the resourceful appropriation of artifacts and surroundings, the ongoing adaptation of systems and routines through designin- use that allows emergent properties to arise and addresses individual needs, and how implicit understanding and explicit tests occur for judging quality. We present a preliminary analysis of design implications in the area of interaction design in the home. Our findings are based on a five-month ethnographic study of three families.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Situating approaches to museum guides for families and groups

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2007
Abstract: 

In this paper, we analyze the current state of museum guide technologies and applications in order to develop an analytical foundation for our future research in an adaptive museum guide for families. We have focused our analysis on three critical areas of interest in considering group and social interaction in museums: tangibility, the role of tangible user interfaces; interaction, visit types and visit flows; adaptivity, user modeling approaches.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

The role of participatory workshops in investigating narrative and sound ecologies in the design of an ambient intelligence audio display

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2006
Abstract: 

We describe two participatory workshops conducted to support design decisions in the making of the audio display for an ambient intelligent game platform. The workshops discussed here explore specific issues of players’ interactions with sound and auditory display design. The workshops helped move our design process forward by specifying the role of narrative and sound ecologies in our design. They clarified the role of sound in creating narrative coherence, guiding player actions, and supporting group interaction. We describe the workshops, the auditory display issues we addressed, discuss how the workshops helped inform our subsequent design, and extend recommendations on how participatory workshops can be used by other designers of auditory displays.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Ec(h)o: Situated play in a tangible and audio museum guide

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2006
Abstract: 

In this paper we discuss an adaptive museum guide prototype in which playfulness is a key design goal for the interaction experience. The interface for our prototype is a combined tangible user interface and audio display. We discuss how we determined the specific requirements for play through an ethnographic study and analysis based on ecological concepts of Bell and Nardi & O’Day. We found that we could consider play in two main forms in regard to the interface: content and physical play. We also found that play is highly contextual. Designers need to consider the situated nature of play for two reasons: 1) to best serve the overall design purpose; 2) in order to understand the nature and degree of play required. We augmented traditional user experience evaluation methods of questionnaires and interviews with observational analysis based on Djajadiningrat’s descriptions of aesthetic interaction.

Document type: 
Article
File(s):