Interactive Arts and Technology, School of (SIAT)

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The School of Interactive Arts and Technology, SIAT, is located at the Surrey campus of SFU. There are two subcollections in SIAT. Please see below.

Kurio: A museum guide for families

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2009
Abstract: 

We discuss three design strategies for improving the quality of social interaction and learning with interactive museum guides: 1) embodied interaction; 2) game-learning; 3) a hybrid system. We used these strategies in our prototype Kurio, which is aimed at supporting families visiting museums. The results of our evaluation show positive implications of implementing the design strategies: closing the social gap, naturalizing technology, and supporting exploration and discovery in learning.

Document type: 
Article
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Anything is a fridge: The implications of everyday designers

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2009
Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Experience structuring factors affecting learning in family visits to museums

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2009
Abstract: 

This paper describes the design and evaluation of an adaptive museum guide for families. In the Kurio system, a mixture of embedded and tangible technology imbues the museum space with additional support for learning and interaction, accessible via tangible user interfaces. Families engage in an educational game where family members are assigned individual challenges and their progress is monitored and coordinated by the family member with a PDA. After each round of challenges, the family returns to a tabletop display to review their progress. In this paper we present the overall evaluation result of Kurio and, using the model discovery approach, we determine which experience structuring factors have a substantial influence on the learning experience.

Document type: 
Article
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A sustainable identity: The creativity of an everyday designer

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2009
Abstract: 

In this paper we explore sustainability in interaction design by reframing concepts of user identity and use in a domestic setting. Building on our own work on everyday design and Blevis’s Sustainable Interaction Design principles, we present examples from an ethnographic study of families in their homes which illustrate design-in-use: the creative and sustainable ways people appropriate and adapt designed artifacts. We claim that adopting a conception of the user as a creative everyday designer generates a new set of design principles that promote sustainable interaction design.

Document type: 
Article
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Making sense of group interaction in an ambient intelligent environment for physical play

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2008
Abstract: 

This paper presents the results of a study on group interaction with a prototype known as socio-ec(h)o. socioec(h)o explores the design of sensing and display, user modeling, and interaction in an embedded interaction system utilizing a game structure. Our study involved the playing of our prototype system by thirty-six (36) participants grouped into teams of four (4). Our aim was to determine heuristics that we could use to further design the interaction and user model approaches for group and embodied interaction systems. We analyzed group interaction and performance based on factors of team cohesion and goal focus. We found that with our system, these factors alone could not explain performance. However, when transitions in the degrees of each factor, i.e. high, medium or low are considered, a clearer picture for performance emerges. The significance of the results is that they describe recognizable factors for positive group interaction.

Document type: 
Article
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Situating approaches to interactive museum guides

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2008
Abstract: 

This paper examines the current state of museum guide technologies and applications in order to develop an analytical foundation for future research on an adaptive museum guide for families. The analysis focuses on three critical areas of interest in considering group and social interaction in museums: tangibility  the role of tangible user interfaces; interaction  visit types and visit flows; and adaptivity  user modeling approaches. It concludes with a discussion of four interrelated trajectories for interactive museum guide research including embodied interaction, gameplay, transparent and opaque interaction and the role of personal digital assistants.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Aspects of everyday design: Resourcefulness, adaptation, and emergence

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2008
Abstract: 

This article discusses how families appropriate artifacts and surroundings that lead to the design of everyday household systems, such as combining a chalkboard, a door frame, and a hanging basket with paper and sticky notes to manage lists and messages. Such systems continually evolve through the catalytic pressures of individual actions and design-in-use. The article reports on a study of four families in which the concept of everyday design in the home was being researched. In-depth descriptions and discussions of the observations and patterns are presented. The design implications of this study are also discussed. The research contributions are an explanation of everyday design as a novel way to understand interactions and routines in the home, descriptions of the key actions and process in everyday design, and the need to reconstruct the user in the sense of an everyday designer.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Looking at the interactive narrative experience through the eyes of the participants

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2008
Abstract: 

The topic of interactive narrative has been under research for many years. While there has been much research exploring the development of new algorithms that enable and enhance interactive narratives, there has been little research focusing on the question of how players understand and internalize their interactive narrative experiences. This paper addresses this problem through conducting a phenomenological study on participants playing Façade; we specifically chose a phenomenological methodology due to its emphasis on the participants‟ lived experience from the participants‟ viewpoint. We chose Façade, because it is the only accessible example of an experience that revolves around social relationships, conflict, and drama as its core mechanics. In this paper, we discuss sixteen themes that resulted from the analysis of the data gathered through the study. In addition, we reflect on these themes discussing their relationship to participants‟ backgrounds, and project implications on the design of future interactive narratives.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Understanding aural fluency in auditory display design for ambient intelligent environments

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2008
Abstract: 

This paper presents the design and some evaluation results from the auditory display model of an ambient intelligent game named socio-ec(h)o. socio-ec(h)o is played physically by a team of four, and displays information via a responsive environment of light and sound. Based on a study of 56 participants involving both qualitative and preliminary quantitative analysis, we present our findings to date as they relate to the auditory display model, future directions and implications. Based on our design and evaluation experience we begin building a theoretical understanding for the unique requirements of informative sonic displays in ambient intelligent and ubiquitous computing systems. We develop and discuss the emerging research concept of aural fluency in ambient intelligent settings.

Document type: 
Article
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A report on participatory workshops for the design of adaptive collaborative learning

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2008
Abstract: 

This “work-in-progress” paper discusses the process of conducting participatory workshops during the design of an adaptive, collaborative learning system. We outline our methods for exploring group interaction, collaboration, and learning in an iterative series workshops. We conclude with a discussion of how the results of these workshops have influenced our ongoing work in designing an adaptive system for family groups in the museum.

Document type: 
Article
File(s):