Interactive Arts and Technology, School of (SIAT)

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The School of Interactive Arts and Technology, SIAT, is located at the Surrey campus of SFU. There are two subcollections in SIAT. Please see below.

How children represent sustainability in the home

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011
Abstract: 

This paper describes an exploratory study about children’s perspective on sustainability in the house through a drawingtelling method. Here, we describe the methodological framework used for interviewing children about issues related to sustainability using the drawing-telling technique as described by Susan Wright [26]. The participants (children from age 9 to 13) were asked to draw two houses and then describe their drawings in terms of sustainable actions and features. The results show how the participants understand sustainability and how they represent it in the context of a house. This pilot study is an initial step to investigate if there are opportunities to develop eco-visualizations (EVs) for children. The goal of this study is to inform the design of eco-visualizations for children based on their understanding of sustainability and their own visualization of their homes.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Design analysis: Understanding e-waste recycling by generation Y

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011
Abstract: 

This paper aims to understand e-waste recycling behavior of Generation Y. It presents a pilot study that explores this generation’s e-waste recycling practices, their attitudes towards ewaste recycling, and the barriers to e-waste recycling. The findings reveal the complexity of the actual e-waste recycling behavior, many participants in this study hold a positive attitude towards e-waste recycling, yet there is a shortage of convenient recycling options and e-waste recycling information. Based on the Motivation-Opportunity-Abilities model, this paper also uncovers the decision-making process involved in each recycling action. We use these findings to present a preliminary analysis of design implications to provoke design ideas and services that support ewaste recycling, and discuss our further research direction.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Understanding interaction design practices

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011
Abstract: 

There is an undesirable gap between HCI research aimed at influencing interaction design practice and the practitioners in question. To close this gap, we advocate a theoretical and methodological focus on the day-to-day, lived experience of designers. To date, this type of theory-generative, experientially oriented research has focused on the users of technologies, not the designers. In contrast, we propose that HCI researchers turn their attention to producing theories of interaction design practice that resonate with practitioners themselves. In part one of this paper, we describe the mismatch between HCI research and interaction design practices. Then we present vignettes from an observational study of commercial design practice to illustrate the issues at hand. In part two, we discuss methodological and theoretical changes in research practice that might support the goal of integrating HCI research with interaction design practices. We then discuss current research methods and theories to identify changes that might enlarge our view on practice. In part three, we elaborate on our theoretically minded agenda and a kind of ideal-type theory.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

The talking poles public art based in social design

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011
Abstract: 

This case study provides insights for artists, designers, and technologists working with community-generated media in the domain of public art. The authors document their recent public artwork, the Talking Poles, and discuss the adaptation of Human Computer Interaction (HCI) design methods to the project. Community-generated public art has a direct relationship to the field of HCI through the technology that underlies both social computing and quotidian digital documentation. When acknowledging ‘citizen action’ as a component of public art, consideration must also be given to preservation of the work as representative of an emergent and shared digital world culture.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

HCI, politics and the city: Engaging with urban grassroots movements for reflection and action

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011
Abstract: 

Grassroots initiatives enable communities of stakeholders to transform urban landscapes and impact broader political and cultural trajectories. In this twoday workshop, we present opportunities to engage HCI research with activist communities in Vancouver, the city hosting CHI’11. Working directly with local activist organizations, we explore the processes, materials, challenges, and goals of grassroots communities. Our bottom-up approach, including explorations of urban spaces and activist headquarters, participatory design sessions, reflection, critique and creative design of political artifacts will bring together a diverse group of HCI researchers, activists and artists. The workshop will result in concrete strategies for bottom-up activism and serve to inform the design of future interactive systems in the domain of political computing.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Four factors of change: Adaptations of everyday design

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011
Abstract: 

This paper is a follow up study of a 2005-2006 study of everyday design. This follow-up study is an opportunity to gain insights into the social evolution of everyday design systems in the home. We report on changes to five systems and discuss how these changes occurred over the last four to five years. We identify four factors related to the changes 1) shared intent 2) mutual intelligibility, 3) materiality-substitutability, and 4) fit.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Children's drawing and telling of sustainability in the home

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011
Abstract: 

This paper describes a pilot study about children’s perspective on environmental sustainability in the home through the drawing-telling technique. We utilize the drawing-telling technique as described by Susan Wright [6] for interviewing children about issues related to sustainability. The participants (children from age 10 to 13) were asked to draw two houses (current and ideal) and then describe their drawings in terms of sustainable actions and features. This pilot study is an initial step to investigate if there are opportunities to develop eco-visualizations (EVs) with children in mind and shows that the drawing-telling technique is useful in researching sustainability and children.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Understanding repair as a creative process of everyday design

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2011
Abstract: 

This paper presents the findings from an exploratory study that looks at how creativity plays a role in the repair and reuse of objects in the home. We are interested in a particular form of creativity that manifests in the everyday – what John Dewey [8] describes as a constant doing and undergoing, as we actively adjust to everyday situations. The goal of this study is to show evidence of repair as not only an act of restoration, but also as an act of creativity that entails the repurposing and resourcing of objects. This study is part of a larger research initiative known as the Everyday Design, where it is believed that everyone is a designer and that design is an ongoing activity that includes the repair, modification, and appropriation of design objects and systems. Furthermore, this study serves as baseline research for future investigations in how to inform the design of technologies whose lifecycle can be extended for various contexts of use through repair.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Socio-ec(h)o: Focus, listening and collaboration in the experience of ambient intelligent environments

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2010
Abstract: 

In this paper, we aim to conceptualize the connection between embodied interactions and the experience of understanding a dynamic auditory display response. We have termed this concept aural fluency and hereby continue previous work documenting in more detail the listening patterns that emerge in users’ experiences with ambient intelligent environments. Aural fluency describes the acquired listening competency and focus on sonic feedback that users form over time in systems utilizing responsive ambient audio display and collaborative embodied interaction. We describe listening positions that characterize the concept and show the stages of aural fluency. The concept arose from the design, analysis and evaluation of an embedded interaction system named socio-ec(h)o – a project upon which we also build on from previous work in the hopes of elucidating further the complex experiences of listening attentions and thus offer insights to the field of auditory displays.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Bridging designers' intentions to outcomes with constructivism

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2010
Abstract: 

This exploratory study investigates the value of constructivist theory for the field of interaction design. In this paper we explore how designer intentions and outcomes can be expressed in constructivist terms, and how constructivism can describe the relationship of design intentions to outcomes. This study’s findings point to the potential of an emerging constructivist framework. The authors present the findings of two case studies of designer intentions and outcomes from two museum design projects. The paper presents themes drawn from the analysis that include designing for personal experience, play, and social interaction.

Document type: 
Article
File(s):