Interactive Arts and Technology, School of (SIAT)

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The School of Interactive Arts and Technology, SIAT, is located at the Surrey campus of SFU. There are two subcollections in SIAT. Please see below.

A case study of intended versus actual experience of adaptivity in a tangible storytelling system

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014
Abstract: 

This article presents a case study of an adaptive, tangible storytelling sys- temcalled “The ReadingGlove”. The research addresses a gap in the field of adaptivity for ubiquitous systems by taking a critical look at the notion of “adaptivity” and how users experience it. The Reading Glove is an interactive storytelling system featur- ing a wearable, glove-based interface and a set of narratively rich objects. A tabletop display provides adaptive recommendations which highlight objects to select next, functioning as an expert storytelling system. The recommendation engine can be run in three different configurations to examine the effects of different adaptive methods. The study of the design process as well as the user experience of the Reading Glove allows us to develop a deeper understanding of the experience of adaptivity that is use- ful for designers of intelligent systems, particularly those with ubiquitous and tangible forms of interaction.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Understanding the Role of Designers’ Personal Experiences in Interaction Design Practice

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014
Abstract: 

Using designers’ personal experiences in interaction design practice is often questioned in a predominantly rationalist practice like HCI and professional interaction design. Perhaps for this reason, little work has been conducted to investigate how designers’ personal experiences can contribute to technology design. Yet it’s undeniable designers have applied their personal experiences to their design practice and also benefited from such experiences. This paper reports on a multiple case study that looks at how interaction designers worked with their personal experiences in three industrial interaction design projects, thus calling for the need to explicitly recognize the legitimacy of using and better support of the use of designers’ personal experiences in interaction design practice. In this study, a designer’s personal experiences refer to the collections of his/her individual experiences derived from his/her direct observation or past real-life events and activities, as well as his/her interaction with design artifacts and systems whether digital or not.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

SFUture - Envisioning a Sustainable University Campus in 2065

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014
Abstract: 

This work describes a design fiction project on1 envisioning a sustainable university campus in the future. The fictional vision called SFUture was carried out through a series of five short films aiming to unlock people's imagination, encourage reflection, and inspire action towards a more sustainable reality at SFU (Simon Fraser University). We discuss our rationale and strategies of using design fiction as a method as well as how we shared the project.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Eclipse: Eliciting the Subjective Qualities of Public Places

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014
Abstract: 

In this Pictorial we explain and describe Eclipse, a method aimed at eliciting subjective qualities of people’s experiences of and relationships with public places. Our method guides participants to sequentially explore their memories, sensations, sense of place, and stories related to a public place. Our goal is to present this method in a pictorial form to make it more concise and more easily usable by other interaction designers; in this, we want to depict the richness and qualities of the elicitations, and ultimately the subjective qualities of a public place.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Collaboration Surrounding Beacon Use During Companion Avalanche Rescues

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014
Abstract: 

When facing an avalanche, backcountry skiers need to work effectively both individually and as a group to rescue buried victims. If they don’t, death is likely. One of the tools used by each person is a digital beacon that transmits an electromagnetic signal. If buried, others use their beacons to locate victims by searching for their signals, and then dig them out. This study focuses on the collaborative practices of avalanche rescue and the interactions with beacons while backcountry skiing. We conducted interviews with backcountry recreationists and experts, and we observed avalanche rescue practice scenarios. Our results highlight aspects and challenges of mental representation, trust, distributed cognition, and practice. Implications include three considerations for the redesign of beacons: simplicity, visibility and practice.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Tactics for HCI Design Interventions with Nonprofit Organizations

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014
Abstract: 

Thirty HCI practitioners participated in a CHI 2011 workshop [7], intending to directly engage with the processes, goals, and challenges of six Vancouver area nonprofit organizations. Analysis of the workshop documentation allowed us to track instances of reciprocal interaction between stakeholders. Findings revealed that various design tactics were productive in enabling collaborators to improve their focus on addressing key challenges they face. This case study contributes new knowledge – tactics to conduct and evaluate HCI Design Interventions with nonprofits, as well as, helping to expand the emerging intersection of political computing and human-computer interaction.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Improving Guide Dog Team Play with Accessible Dog Toys

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014
Abstract: 

People with vision impairment have been a longstanding well-recognized user group addressed in HCI. Despite the recent interest in studying sighted dog owners and their pets in HCI, there is a noticeable gap in the field with regards to research on visually impaired owners and their dogs (guide dog teams). This paper presents portions of an ongoing study that explores interactions of guide dog teams revealing major opportunities for focusing on challenges faced in “off-work” everyday activities. In particular, opportunities point to promoting design interventions enriching play-interaction through accessible dog toys utilizing sensor technologies.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

From DIY Tutorials to DIY Recipes

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014
Abstract: 

While online DIY (do-it-yourself) tutorials have increasingly gained interest both at CHI and in the DIY and Maker communities, there is not a lot of research concerning the qualities and drawbacks of the current formats used to share DIY knowledge online. Drawing on our current study of DIY tutorials, in this paper we propose an experimentation in which we ‘translate’ DIY tutorials from their current formats to a more traditional cookbook style format. We present two tutorials – the Cardboard Desklamp and the DIY Cellphone – with their translation and discuss what we learned from the translation process.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Design for One: A Game Controller for a Quadriplegic Gamer

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2014
Abstract: 

This paper explores utilizing digital fabrication and electronic prototyping techniques to build a game controller and a mouse for a quadriplegic patient. We present two products (keyboard and mouse) and DIY electronic prototyping techniques, which were developed in a collaborative effort between the designers and a quadriplegic teenager. We suggest that DIY and personal digital fabrication techniques can be adopted by occupational therapists and assistive technologists in particular cases, or where the traditional techniques fail to support or meet patients’ requirements.

Document type: 
Article
File(s):