Interactive Arts and Technology, School of (SIAT)

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The School of Interactive Arts and Technology, SIAT, is located at the Surrey campus of SFU. There are two subcollections in SIAT. Please see below.

Dynamic Intelligent Lighting for Directing Visual Attention in Interactive 3D Scenes

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2009
Abstract: 

Recent enhancements in real-time graphics have facilitated the design of high fidelity game environments with complex 3D worlds inhabited by animated characters. Under such settings, it is hard, especially for the untrained eyes, to attend to an object of interest. Neuroscience research as well as film and theatre practice identified several visual properties, such as contrast, orientation, and color that play a major role in channeling attention. In this paper, we discuss an adaptive lighting design system called ALVA (Adaptive Lighting for Visual Attention) that dynamically adjusts the lighting color and brightness to enhance visual attention within game environments using features identified by neuroscience, psychophysics, and visual design literature. We also discuss some preliminary results showing the utility of ALVA in directing player’s attention to important elements in a fast paced 3D game, and thus enhancing the game experience especially for non-gamers who are not visually trained to spot objects or characters in such complex 3D worlds.

Document type: 
Article
File(s): 

Spatialized Sound Influences Biomechanical Self-Motion Illusion ("Vection")

Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2010
Abstract: 

Although moving auditory cues have long been known to induce self-motion illusions (“circular vection”) in blindfolded participants, little is known about how spatial sound can facilitate or interfere with vection induced by other non-visual modalities like biomechanical cues. To address this issue, biomechanical circular vection was induced in seated, stationary participants by having them step sideways along a rotating floor (“circular treadmill”) turning at 60 /s (see Fig. 1, top). Three research hypotheses were tested by comparing four different sound conditions in combination with the same biomechanical vection-inducing stimulus.

Document type: 
Article

Moving Sounds Enhance the Visually-Induced Self-Motion Illusion (Circular Vection) in Virtual Reality

Peer reviewed: 
Yes, item is peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2009-03
Abstract: 

While rotating visual and auditory stimuli have long been known to elicit self-motion illusions (“circular vection”), audiovisual interactions have hardly been investigated. Here, two experiments investigated whether visually induced circular vection can be enhanced by concurrently rotating auditory cues that match visual landmarks (e.g., a fountain sound). Participants sat behind a curved projection screen displaying rotating panoramic renderings of a market place. Apart from a no-sound condition, headphone-based auditory stimuli consisted of mono sound, ambient sound, or low-/high-spatial resolution auralizations using generic head-related transfer functions (HRTFs). While merely adding nonrotating (mono or ambient) sound showed no effects, moving sound stimuli facilitated both vection and presence in the virtual environment. This spatialization benefit was maximal for a medium (20 degrees × 15 degrees) FOV, reduced for a larger (54 degrees × 45 degrees) FOV and unexpectedly absent for the smallest (10 degrees × 7.5 degrees) FOV. Increasing auralization spatial fidelity (from low, comparable to five-channel home theatre systems, to high, 5 degree resolution) provided no further benefit, suggesting a ceiling effect. In conclusion, both self-motion perception and presence can benefit from adding moving auditory stimuli. This has important implications both for multimodal cue integration theories and the applied challenge of building affordable yet effective motion simulators.

Document type: 
Article