Allyson Clay works

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Digitized works of SFU Contemporary Arts professor Allyson Clay. The works include artworks on paper, paintings, mock-ups and sketches for projects, chapbooks, special projects for journals, catalogues, essays in books, sketchbook pages and journal excerpts, and objects that resulted from the process of making art. The works are in this collection and in the following sub-collections.

Blemish.

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1992
Document type: 
Image
File(s): 

Private Floating World.

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1998
Abstract: 

The tondi in the series "Private Floating World" show three views of a particular location in Disneyland. Rather, they show the same view with the only difference being distance from the image. Paradoxically, nothing more is revealed in the image offering the closest view. 

Document type: 
Image

Installation View.

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2002
Abstract: 

Clay’s "Untitled" series is an installation comprising three photographs illuminated in light boxes, two small framed oval images of photography and text, and black vinyl text installed at intervals across the gallery walls and spaced between the photographs. While the installation includes photography it nevertheless refers to painting. The composition, color and subject of the illuminated photographs recall Jacques-Louis David’s portrait of Juliette Récamier. Unlike Madame Récamier, the woman in Clay’s photographs, who is the artist herself, denies the viewer her gaze: her back and head are turned, and then she gets up and exits the frame. The images in the oval frames are similarly elusive by being fragmentary. Correspondingly, the wall text does not explain the photos and instead signals dreaming, daily life, and poetic reverie. Photographic clarity and meaning in language, especially in the gallery context, yield to private, inner experience. 

Document type: 
Image
File(s): 

Installation View 3.

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
2002
Abstract: 

Clay’s "Untitled" series is an installation comprising three photographs illuminated in light boxes, two small framed oval images of photography and text, and black vinyl text installed at intervals across the gallery walls and spaced between the photographs. While the installation includes photography it nevertheless refers to painting. The composition, color and subject of the illuminated photographs recall Jacques-Louis David’s portrait of Juliette Récamier. Unlike Madame Récamier, the woman in Clay’s photographs, who is the artist herself, denies the viewer her gaze: her back and head are turned, and then she gets up and exits the frame. The images in the oval frames are similarly elusive by being fragmentary. Correspondingly, the wall text does not explain the photos and instead signals dreaming, daily life, and poetic reverie. Photographic clarity and meaning in language, especially in the gallery context, yield to private, inner experience. 

Document type: 
Image
File(s): 

Untitled III (Self Portrait), Detail 2 of 2.

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1998
Abstract: 

Clay’s "Untitled" series is an installation comprising three photographs illuminated in light boxes, two small framed oval images of photography and text, and black vinyl text installed at intervals across the gallery walls and spaced between the photographs. While the installation includes photography it nevertheless refers to painting. The composition, color and subject of the illuminated photographs recall Jacques-Louis David’s portrait of Juliette Récamier. Unlike Madame Récamier, the woman in Clay’s photographs, who is the artist herself, denies the viewer her gaze: her back and head are turned, and then she gets up and exits the frame. The images in the oval frames are similarly elusive by being fragmentary. Correspondingly, the wall text does not explain the photos and instead signals dreaming, daily life, and poetic reverie. Photographic clarity and meaning in language, especially in the gallery context, yield to private, inner experience. 

Document type: 
Image

Untitled III (Self Portrait), Detail 1 of 2.

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1998
Abstract: 

Clay’s "Untitled" series is an installation comprising three photographs illuminated in light boxes, two small framed oval images of photography and text, and black vinyl text installed at intervals across the gallery walls and spaced between the photographs. While the installation includes photography it nevertheless refers to painting. The composition, color and subject of the illuminated photographs recall Jacques-Louis David’s portrait of Juliette Récamier. Unlike Madame Récamier, the woman in Clay’s photographs, who is the artist herself, denies the viewer her gaze: her back and head are turned, and then she gets up and exits the frame. The images in the oval frames are similarly elusive by being fragmentary. Correspondingly, the wall text does not explain the photos and instead signals dreaming, daily life, and poetic reverie. Photographic clarity and meaning in language, especially in the gallery context, yield to private, inner experience. 

Document type: 
Image

Installation View 2.

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1997
Abstract: 

Clay’s "Untitled" series is an installation comprising three photographs illuminated in light boxes, two small framed oval images of photography and text, and black vinyl text installed at intervals across the gallery walls and spaced between the photographs. While the installation includes photography it nevertheless refers to painting. The composition, color and subject of the illuminated photographs recall Jacques-Louis David’s portrait of Juliette Récamier. Unlike Madame Récamier, the woman in Clay’s photographs, who is the artist herself, denies the viewer her gaze: her back and head are turned, and then she gets up and exits the frame. The images in the oval frames are similarly elusive by being fragmentary. Correspondingly, the wall text does not explain the photos and instead signals dreaming, daily life, and poetic reverie. Photographic clarity and meaning in language, especially in the gallery context, yield to private, inner experience. 

Document type: 
Image
File(s): 

Untitled II (Previously Swallowed Small Artifacts), Detail.

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1997
Abstract: 

Clay’s "Untitled" series is an installation comprising three photographs illuminated in light boxes, two small framed oval images of photography and text, and black vinyl text installed at intervals across the gallery walls and spaced between the photographs. While the installation includes photography it nevertheless refers to painting. The composition, color and subject of the illuminated photographs recall Jacques-Louis David’s portrait of Juliette Récamier. Unlike Madame Récamier, the woman in Clay’s photographs, who is the artist herself, denies the viewer her gaze: her back and head are turned, and then she gets up and exits the frame. The images in the oval frames are similarly elusive by being fragmentary. Correspondingly, the wall text does not explain the photos and instead signals dreaming, daily life, and poetic reverie. Photographic clarity and meaning in language, especially in the gallery context, yield to private, inner experience. 

Document type: 
Image

Installation View 1.

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1997
Abstract: 

Clay’s "Untitled" series is an installation comprising three photographs illuminated in light boxes, two small framed oval images of photography and text, and black vinyl text installed at intervals across the gallery walls and spaced between the photographs. While the installation includes photography it nevertheless refers to painting. The composition, color and subject of the illuminated photographs recall Jacques-Louis David’s portrait of Juliette Récamier. Unlike Madame Récamier, the woman in Clay’s photographs, who is the artist herself, denies the viewer her gaze: her back and head are turned, and then she gets up and exits the frame. The images in the oval frames are similarly elusive by being fragmentary. Correspondingly, the wall text does not explain the photos and instead signals dreaming, daily life, and poetic reverie. Photographic clarity and meaning in language, especially in the gallery context, yield to private, inner experience. 

Document type: 
Image
File(s): 

Untitled I (My Sense of Place), Detail 2 of 2.

Author: 
Peer reviewed: 
No, item is not peer reviewed.
Date created: 
1997
Abstract: 

Clay’s "Untitled" series is an installation comprising three photographs illuminated in light boxes, two small framed oval images of photography and text, and black vinyl text installed at intervals across the gallery walls and spaced between the photographs. While the installation includes photography it nevertheless refers to painting. The composition, color and subject of the illuminated photographs recall Jacques-Louis David’s portrait of Juliette Récamier. Unlike Madame Récamier, the woman in Clay’s photographs, who is the artist herself, denies the viewer her gaze: her back and head are turned, and then she gets up and exits the frame. The images in the oval frames are similarly elusive by being fragmentary. Correspondingly, the wall text does not explain the photos and instead signals dreaming, daily life, and poetic reverie. Photographic clarity and meaning in language, especially in the gallery context, yield to private, inner experience. 

Document type: 
Image